Joey’s Story: King of ‘You Can Do Anything!’

Note: This post was written by our own Sarah Bal, as told by Joey Ortiz.

My name is Joey Ortiz. Recently, I had the honor of being voted Homecoming King at Santa Maria High School. I want to share my story with you.

I have Down syndrome, which affects many individuals throughout the United States. I made the decision a long time ago not to let anything get in my way, not even Down syndrome. I work at a local supermarket everyday through a vocational education program and enjoy the opportunity to work in my community. Like my classmates I enjoy school and work hard to complete my assignments on time.

One day a few weeks ago I decided that I wanted to become Homecoming King. A teacher asked me a few days later if I was still interested and I registered to be one of the nominees. I rallied my friends together and we made posters and hats to promote me around school. I went around and spoke with other members of the student body, some that I had never met before, and told them that I was running for Homecoming King. A lot of people were surprised, but most people said, “Go for it Joey!” and that is exactly what I did. Their encouragement helped me feel more confident and ready to keep campaigning.

The Homecoming Rally was an exciting event for everyone at school. When all of the candidates were presented everyone clapped. When my name was announced there was a ton of applause and people began to chant my name. I realized then that I had a chance at winning.

That night at the Homecoming game people began to chant my name again while they stamped their feet in the bleachers. Then to my surprise and delight, I was elected Homecoming King. All of my work had paid off, and everyone at the school chose me. All I can say is that it makes my heart glad to think that so many people like me.

I just want anyone with Down syndrome or another disability to know that you can do anything!

Don’t Cut Clare’s Lifeline

On Wednesday, July 6th, the O’Brien family from Waycross, Georgia joined The Arc and other families that would be affected by Medicaid cuts in a meeting with key staff at the White House. The purpose of the meeting was for the White House to hear how Medicaid cuts would affect each family’s circumstances as President Obama continues to engage in deficit reduction talks.

Deirdre O’Brien has two children, including her 13-year-old daughter, Clare, who has significant intellectual disabilities. Clare also suffers from abdominal migraines, which are similar to traditional migraines but the pain is in the stomach and causes her to vomit continuously for days. Two years ago, Clare’s migraines became very severe, occurring nearly every two weeks. Her hemoglobin dropped severely, she missed a significant amount of school and her parents missed work to take care of her. During this period, the O’Brien family saw no alternative but for Deirdre to quit her job and stay at home in case her daughter became ill. The state of Georgia recognized Clare’s needs and she was granted a small Medicaid home and community based waiver, which allowed Deirdre to hire staff to help care for her daughter.

“Without Medicaid, our family’s life would revolve around illness, not health and happiness. Clare gets the care she needs from her family and from the staff paid for by Medicaid funds, and I can continue to work. Medicaid is a lifeline for us, and the White House needs to hear our story and the stories of the thousands of families like ours in Georgia,” said Deirdre O’Brien.

Take Action

Find out more on the potential cuts to Medicaid and The Arc’s Don’t Cut Our Lifeline campain. Take action and tell your elected officials “Don’t Cut Our Lifeline!”

About the Video

This video was produced and edited for The Arc by INFOCUS NEWS, a supported employment program for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The primary goal of “INFOCUS NEWS” is to provide employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who have been trained in various aspects of video news production; from writing news scripts, to anchoring/reporting stories, camera operation, video editing, lighting, sound engineering, and studio management.

Don’t Cut Graysen’s Lifeline

On Wednesday, July 6th, the Keaton family from Milton, West Virginia joined The Arc and other families that would be affected by Medicaid cuts in a meeting with key staff at the White House. The purpose of the meeting was for the White House to hear how Medicaid cuts would affect each family’s circumstances as President Obama continues to engage in deficit reduction talks.

Amanda and Greg Keaton are parents of 18-month-old Graysen, who has DiGeorge Syndrome. DiGeorge syndrome (22q11.2 deletion syndrome) is a disorder caused by a defect in chromosome 22, resulting in the poor development of several body systems. Graysen’s main medical conditions include two severe congenital heart defects – Tetralogy of Fallot and Pulmonary Atresia. In addition, Graysen has required a tracheostomy and ventilator support since 8 weeks old. Graysen spent his first six and a half months in the hospital, and his one year anniversary at home was June 21, 2011. In his young life, Graysen has suffered two strokes, undergone three open heart surgeries, a feeding tube placement, multiple heart catheterizations, and he hit the $1 million cap on his mother’s health insurance before he turned four months old. Graysen’s nursing care, specialized pediatric tube feedings, along with other important therapies and preventive medications and vaccines are covered by Medicaid through West Virginia’s Children with Disabilities Community Services Program.

“Drastic cuts in Medicaid would force me to quit my job to take care of Graysen, as I couldn’t afford the nursing care without it. Medicaid is our lifeline, and I’m going to urge the White House to keep the nation’s commitment to provide for the most vulnerable, like my son, so that he can continue to live with us and we can keep our jobs and our home,” said Amanda Keaton.

Take Action

Find out more on the potential cuts to Medicaid and The Arc’s Don’t Cut Our Lifeline campain. Take action and tell your elected officials “Don’t Cut Our Lifeline!”

About the Video

This video was produced and edited for The Arc by INFOCUS NEWS, a supported employment program for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The primary goal of “INFOCUS NEWS” is to provide employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who have been trained in various aspects of video news production; from writing news scripts, to anchoring/reporting stories, camera operation, video editing, lighting, sound engineering, and studio management.

Don’t Cut Bailey’s Lifeline

On Wednesday, July 6th, the Brandt family from Springfield, Virginia joined The Arc and other families that would be affected by Medicaid cuts in a meeting with key staff at the White House. The purpose of the meeting is for the White House to hear how Medicaid cuts would affect each family’s circumstances as President Obama continues to engage in deficit reduction talks.

Carrin and Mitchell Brandt are parents of 10-year-old Bailey, who has an intractable (uncontrolled) seizure disorder, cerebral palsy, a history of aspiration and significant global delays. Bailey needs assistance and support with all daily living and recreational activities, and Medicaid helps pay for it. She has a shunt, a G-tube, and uses a communication device. Bailey has had more than five seizures daily, and Medicaid paid for her brain surgery to remove her left hemisphere for better seizure control. Medicaid has paid for over fifteen seizure medications, one of which was over $1,000 for a one week supply. She has had orthopedic issues, including a hip displacement and a leg length discrepancy. When Bailey grows older, she will need Medicaid for long-term support needs, such as residential and day support.

“If we lost Medicaid, it would jeopardize my husband’s small business, and one of us would have to give up our jobs. Bailey’s life and health could dramatically change, as she wouldn’t be able to participate in our community and continue to grow to be as independent as possible. We don’t want to ever see our daughter living in an institution, but without Medicaid, we don’t know what our future holds,” said Carrin Brandt.

Take Action

Find out more on the potential cuts to Medicaid and The Arc’s Don’t Cut Our Lifeline campain. Take action and tell your elected officials “Don’t Cut Our Lifeline!”

About the Video

This video was produced and edited for The Arc by INFOCUS NEWS, a supported employment program for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The primary goal of “INFOCUS NEWS” is to provide employment for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities who have been trained in various aspects of video news production; from writing news scripts, to anchoring/reporting stories, camera operation, video editing, lighting, sound engineering, and studio management.

Answering the Question: What has Medicaid Done for You?

Javi Guzman

Javi Guzman, age 17, has autism and a debilitating connective tissue disorder called Ehlers – Danlos Syndrome, type 3. He visisted with senior White House officials yesterday to talk about what medicaid cuts would mean to him.

By Linda Guzman
Assistant Director of Operations, The Arc of North Carolina

Riding the metro to the White House today, I had no idea what Javi and I would be in store for. My son Javi Guzman, age 17, has autism and a debilitating connective tissue disorder called Ehlers – Danlos Syndrome, type 3. We were going to the White House to talk to President Obama’s senior staff about how Medicaid has changed both Javi’s and my life.

What probably seemed like a simple question didn’t have a simple answer: “What has Medicaid done for you?” What is more telling is what we wouldn’t have if we didn’t have Medicaid. Without community based waivers, Javi wouldn’t be at home – he would most likely be in an institution to receive the care he needs. I wouldn’t be able to work, pay taxes, and be the citizen and mother that I am. Medicaid is our lifeline. With the services Medicaid provides, not only are Javi’s medical needs taken care of, he is learning important skills that will enable him to have the most independent and productive life possible.

I’m deeply appreciative to all those who to took time to meet with us today. I am especially grateful to Congressman David Price who stepped out of a subcommittee mark-up to listen to Javi’s and my story in the hallway, and even took an extra moment so Javi could get a picture with him.

Today showed me the strength of our voices and our stories. The officials we met with told us, “If Members of Congress could sit down with families like yours, they would stop seeing the world in dollars and cents.”

Its stories like mine and yours that will make our elected officials see things in true light, not just in spread sheets.

Join The Arc’s “Don’t Cut Our Lifeline” campaign today, and make a difference.