The Arc of Delaware Reaches Fair Housing Settlement

Washington, DCThe Arc of Delaware and its counsel Relman, Dane & Colfax, The Arc of the United States, and Community Legal Aid Society, Inc. are thrilled to announce the recent settlement of The Arc of Delaware’s disability discrimination complaint against Sugar Maple Farms Property Owners’ Association, Inc. (SMFPOA). That complaint, filed in March 2015 with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Delaware Division of Human Relations (DHR), sought a declaration that SMFPOA violated the Fair Housing Act when it refused to approve The Arc of Delaware’s acquisition of property meant to house four individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in a single family home integrated within the community. The complaint sought damages to compensate for the loss of housing opportunities and for violations of the federal and Delaware Fair Housing Acts due to disability discrimination. After DHR issued a finding of discrimination in March 2016, SMFPOA agreed to settle the case and has entered into a Conciliation Agreement with DHR, HUD, and The Arc of Delaware as of May 26, 2016.

“This case shows the importance of vigorously enforcing the Fair Housing Act,” noted Michael Allen, a partner with Relman, Dane & Colfax.  “Although the Act has prohibited disability discrimination for nearly 30 years, we still need to fight every day to redeem the promise of community living for people with disabilities.”

In July 2014, Terry Olson, Executive Director, submitted a bid on behalf of The Arc of Delaware for a lot owned by SMFPOA. The Arc of Delaware intended to build a single family house in a Milford, Delaware residential subdivision with 65 other lots. His offer was accepted by the seller contingent on SMFPOA’s approval of the sale. However, once SMFPOA learned that residents with I/DD would be living there, it told Mr. Olson that such use was barred by its covenants and also expressed concerns about the amount of parking that would be required by the residents’ support staff.

Mr. Olson tried to explain that The Arc of Delaware’s use was protected by the Fair Housing Act and offered to accommodate the extra parking needs while maintaining a uniform appearance within the community. He also offered to give SMFPOA members a tour of a similar home in the area in order to allay any concerns about daily operations. Shortly thereafter, The Arc of Delaware received a letter from SMFPOA reiterating its position that the sale was not approved because it would violate SMFPOA’s covenants and suggesting that allowing people with I/DD into the community would reduce property values and disturb the “quiet enjoyment” of neighbors. The loss of the property and subsequent delay in state funding have deprived The Arc of Delaware and its clients of at least four community-based housing opportunities.

The Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 (FHAA) makes it unlawful to “make unavailable or deny” a dwelling because of disability as well as to refuse to make “reasonable accommodations in rules, policies, practices, or services, when such accommodations may be necessary to afford such person equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling.” Federal courts have consistently held that community supported housing for unrelated individuals with I/DD does not constitute a “business” and does not violate “single family” restrictions, and Delaware law expressly recognizes such housing as “single family” properties for zoning purposes. Further, the courts recognize that most discriminatory remarks are made in coded language, such as the need to “maintain property value.”

Once the complaints had been filed, DHR performed an investigation and issued a finding of discrimination in March 2016. Subsequently, SMFPOA agreed to settle the case. Among other things, the Conciliation Agreement requires SMFPOA to:

  • Apply the same terms and conditions of rental to anyone occupying its properties without regard to disability or any other protected class;
  • Provide written compliance reports to DHR and/or HUD when requested;
  • Allow HUD and DHR to inspect the premises at any time within one year of the agreement;
  • Notify its members and residents in writing of rules, policies, and practices relating to its non-discrimination policy and to prominently display the Equal Housing Opportunity logo within any relevant advertisements it distributes;
  • Ensure that all of its current board members receive comprehensive training on the Fair Housing Act within 90 days of signing the agreement and that all future board members receive such training within 30 days of their election;
  • Pay The Arc of Delaware $55,000 in damages, including attorneys’ fees and costs.

Mr. Olson remarked: “It is challenging enough in Delaware for individuals with I/DD to find affordable housing in the community. When you add discrimination to the mix, it makes it nearly impossible. This victory will help ensure that individuals with disabilities in Delaware will have the same rights as other citizens to live in the community of their choice.”

Shira Wakschlag, Staff Attorney with The Arc of the United States, noted: “For more than 65 years, The Arc has sought to enforce and protect the human and civil rights of individuals with I/DD by working to ensure those with disabilities are able to live in the community free from discrimination and institutional settings. Without the vigorous enforcement of state and federal disability rights laws in instances of discrimination such as this one, this fundamental right would be eroded.”

Relman, Dane & Colfax, a civil rights law firm based in Washington, D.C., served as lead counsel on the case, with The Arc of the United States and Community Legal Aid Society, Inc. serving as co-counsel.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country, including The Arc of Delaware, promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

Statement from Julie Petty, Loretta Claiborne, Ricardo Thornton and Frank Stephens

IMG_0788On June 6, 2016, a group of self-advocate leaders met with Gary Owen to discuss offensive content in his Showtime comedy special “I Agree With Myself”.

Statement from Julie Petty, Loretta Claiborne, Ricardo Thornton and Frank Stephens:
Today, Julie Petty (Bentonville, Arkansas), Loretta Claiborne (York, Pennsylvania), Ricardo Thornton (Washington, D.C.) and Frank Stephens (Fairfax, Virginia), representing a broad coalition of disability advocates, met with Gary Owen, a comedian and entertainer.  The meeting was arranged for both sides to listen and hear one another’s perspectives about a segment on Mr. Owen’s comedy special on Showtime.

Prior to the meeting, Mr. Owen decided to remove the segment in his Showtime special in which he depicts people with intellectual disabilities.  Effective immediately, the special will still be available On Demand but will not include this portion.

The meeting was educational, positive and productive.   The outcomes from the meeting were significant.  Mr. Owen made positive commitments regarding use of the “R word” in his comedy routine.

The coalition has agreed to end its advocacy efforts in this situation.  The coalition, through the voices of self advocates Julie Petty, Loretta Claiborne, Ricardo Thornton and Frank Stephens, express our appreciation to Mr. Owen for listening and acting positively to further understanding and healing.

Zika – We All Have Skin in This Game

Some public health crises capture our attention more than others.  A few years back, the phones were ringing off the hook on Capitol Hill about Ebola.  But not so for the Zika virus, we are hearing from Congressional offices.  Is this because we think that Zika will only affect women who are pregnant?  Or just those who live in southern states?  Are we not understanding that this virus could potentially quickly spread in local communities or that people in the south who are at greatest risk right now travel to other parts of the country?

Such a false sense of immunity could cost us dearly.  Studies are rolling in and, taken together, are painting an alarming picture.  According to a study released last week, two million pregnant women in the U.S. could contract the virus by November while another study finds that 29% of Zika-infected women gave birth to babies with adverse outcomes, including stillbirth, microcephaly, and other serious health problems.  Another found that microcephaly alone occurs in up to 13% of babies born to their mothers who became infected during their first trimester.  And this is only what we do know.  Still unknown are, among other things, the long-term effects of Zika on adults and children who contract the virus after birth.  “We still don’t know yet the full rainbow of complications that this virus may produce,” according to the director of communicable diseases for the Pan-American Health Organization.

If we don’t act now, the implications could be dramatic in both the short and long term.  For instance, the travel industry could be decimated in the southern coastal states this summer as infection rates and corresponding fear rise.   Further down the road, state Medicaid programs could see a surge in demand for services for not just people with microcephaly, but those with the still unknown other disabilities that may be significant and lifelong.

Congress left for its Memorial Day recess before having finalized an emergency spending bill for Zika prevention.  When it reconvenes this week, it is imperative that Members hear from their constituents who understand that that Zika prevention is truly a national and urgent priority. Stay up to date on this issue and many others impacting people with disabilities by signing up for our Disability Advocacy Network – be in-the-know and take action when needed!

Blaze a Trail to Future Planning

In the spirit of this year’s Older Americans Month theme, “Blaze a Trail,” The Arc recognizes the many parents of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) who fought for decades to raise their children at home, to realize their rights to free and appropriate public education, and for recognition as valued contributors to the community. The Arc is committed to supporting these aging caregivers and their adult sons and daughters with I/DD to develop a roadmap for the future.

Future planning is important for all families, but it can be especially challenging for the almost 1 million families in which adults with I/DD are living with aging caregivers.  In two-thirds of these families, there is no plan in place for the future. Many of these families have no connection to the disability community or the disability service system. It is our role to support them to overcome the fear of planning and provide them the information and resources they need to create future plans.

To support these trailblazing families, The Arc of the United States launched the Center for Future Planning™ in 2014. Discussing these major life transitions and putting a plan in place may actually alleviate some of the stress experienced by aging caregivers, their adult sons and daughters, and other family members and supporters.

The Center’s website provides reliable information and assistance to individuals with I/DD, their family members and friends, staff at chapters of The Arc, and other disability professionals on:

  • person-centered planning
  • supported decision-making and guardianship
  • housing options
  • financial planning (including public benefits, special needs trusts, and ABLE accounts)
  • employment and daily activities
  • making social connections
  • providing information if an urgent need arises

During Older Americans Month, here are some ways you can access more help:

  • Read more information about future planning and see how other families have planned.
  • View The Arc’s webinar on supports and services for aging caregivers.
  • Visit The Arc’s new Build Your Plan™ online tool that enables families to create accounts and begin to build their plans within the Center for Future Planning™. Check out the demonstration webinar to learn more about how to navigate Build Your Plan and encourage families to begin creating plans.
  • Encourage families you know to start the process and to get support in their communities. Chapters of The Arc around the country can provide guidance and information about local resources.  Families can also identify professionals in their communities to help them create and implement future plans through The Arc’s Professional Services Directory.
  • In addition, Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) can help with accessing services and support available to seniors. AAAs offer a variety of home and community-based services such as respite, meals on wheels, and transportation. Visit for more information about additional benefits available to seniors.

Supporting aging caregivers and adults with I/DD is an ongoing process and is possible with the help of other family members, friends, the community and professionals. It’s important to work together to develop a plan that will ease the stress of future transitions. You can contact The Arc’s national office at (202) 202-617-3268 or for more help.

The Arc’s Letter to Gary Owen on his Comments Offensive to People with Disabilities

May 12, 2016
Dear Mr. Owen,

I am writing in regard to your Showtime Special “Agree with Myself”
and its flagrant mockery of people with intellectual and developmental
disabilities (I/DD). As the nation’s largest organization serving and advocating
with and for people with I/DD, with a network of more than 650 chapters across
the country, we’ve received many complaints about the content of this
program from people who are truly outraged. Having watched the offensive clip
myself, I felt compelled to contact you to voice our concerns.

The segment I am referring to includes you using the word ”retarded” to
describe your cousin with intellectual disabilities. People with I/DD have made
clear for decades that they consider the ”r-word” to be demeaning and don’t
accept it being used to describe them. They view it as analogous to the use of
the ”n-word” to describe a person who is black. For them it is a slap in the face
that reminds them of all the verbal and physical abuse and discrimination they
have experienced on a daily basis. What they want is respect.

In addition to the use of this slur, the content of your act, your antics
and the tone you took are equally unacceptable. Your sketch about your cousin,
her lover and her friends is demoralizing and attacks individuals with I/DD on
multiple levels, from their speech to their sexuality. You dehumanize them for
laughs, not taking into account the dark history individuals with disabilities have
faced in our nation. Individuals with disabilities have suffered through decades
of discrimination and humiliation including forced sterilization, abuse, and

The fact of the matter is that your special contains callous verbal
violence against a minority group. I hope you can see that this goes beyond an
issue of an artist’s freedom of speech – this is hate speech. The Arc, Special
Olympics, dozens of other disability organizations, and thousands of advocates
across the country are united in our outrage that you and Showtime have failed
to pull this program from On Demand or edit out the offensive segment. We
hope you have dropped it from your live performances.

IVlr. Owen, perhaps you don’t understand that 85 percent of people
with I/DD are not employed, when they could be working but no one will hire
them. Or maybe you are unaware that people with disabilities are three times
more likely to be the victim of violent crimes and four times more likely to be
victims of sexual violence. Fifty-two percent of students with I/DD leave high
school without a regular diploma which greatly limits their prospects for
employment and post-secondary education. Public attitudes and lack of
understanding of people with I/DD, and lack of appreciation for their humanity,
is perhaps the single biggest reason for the challenges people with I/DD face in
being fully included, participating and being treated fairly in their communities.

You could have been part of the solution, as has your fellow comedian
Amy Schumer, but instead you contribute to the problem. Recently, 50 Cent
knew when to apologize after stepping over the line, why not you?

I welcome the opportunity to discuss this matter with you and to
introduce you to people with I/DD who are quite different from the caricature
you provided. As you tour the country in the coming months, we would be
happy to connect you with local chapters of The Arc that will arrange for you to
meet people with I/DD who are leading full lives in and are contributing to their

Peter V. Berns
CEO, The Arc

Proposed Ban of Electrical Stimulation Devices An Overdue Step Forward for Dignity and Respect for People with Disabilities

By: Nicole Jorwic, Director of Rights Policy

Every behavior is a form of communication. This is a truth that must be remembered, as we advocate for the civil rights for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). Even self-injurious or aggressive behaviors are an attempt by an individual to demonstrate something. Supports should be in place to draw out that communication, not shock it or punish it away. This is why the recent proposed rule from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) banning the use of electrical stimulation devices (ESD) to treat these forms of behavior is so important.

Per the FDA’s proposed rule, the use of electrical stimulation devices pose the risks of depression, fear, anxiety, panic, learned helplessness, and are associated with the additional risks of nightmares, flashbacks, hypervigilance, insensitivity to fatigue or pain, changes in sleep patterns, loss of interest, difficulty concentrating, and withdrawal from usual activity. The science verifying those risks is clear, while there is no scientific proof that the use of electric shock has benefits in the short or long term.

The science has been clear for years and for decades The Arc has provided testimony at hearings on this issue, submitted comments, and filed amicus briefs encouraging the ban of these devices. Instead of using harmful and demoralizing ESDs, the focus of treatment for all individuals with I/DD who cannot use their voices or other forms of communication to express their wants and needs, must be on changing environmental factors. This will allow the roots of challenging behaviors to be found and allow the individual to discover alternative behaviors that can be used to meet their needs.

The Arc has adopted position statements opposing the use of aversive procedures since at least 1984. Our current position statement on Behavioral Supports developed jointly with the American Association on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (AAIDD) and adopted by both organizations in 2010, states in part:

Research indicates that aversive procedures such as deprivation, physical restraint and seclusion do not reduce challenging behaviors, and in fact can inhibit the development of appropriate skills and behaviors. These practices are dangerous, dehumanizing, result in a loss of dignity, and are unacceptable in a civilized society.

The Arc and AAIDD are opposed to all aversive procedures, such as electric shock, deprivation, seclusion and isolation. Interventions must not withhold essential food and drink, cause physical and/or psychological pain or result in humiliation or discomfort.

Our position statement on Education, which was adopted by the Congress of Delegates in 2011, states in part:

In order to provide a free, appropriate public education for students with I/DD, all those involved in the education of students with I/DD must:

  • Ensure that students with disabilities are not subjected to unwarranted restraint or isolation or to aversives.

The Arc is strong in its belief that it is the responsibility of government to protect individuals with disabilities from mistreatment. Using aversive procedures to change behaviors of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities is dangerous, dehumanizing, a violation of civil rights, results in a loss of dignity, and is unacceptable in a civilized society.

The Arc applauds the FDA in its effort to ban the use of devices that emit electric shock as a means of modifying the behavior of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.


DOL Releases New Overtime Final Rule-Including Non-Enforcement for Some Medicaid Providers

By: Nicole Jorwic, Director of Rights Policy

The Department of Labor released the much anticipated final Overtime rule today, with the an effective date of December 1, 2016. Along with the rule, DOL announced a non-enforcement policy for providers of Medicaid-funded services for individuals with intellectual or developmental disabilities in residential homes and facilities with 15 or fewer beds. The full policy will be published in the Federal Register next week. The non-enforcement policy will be in effect from December 1, 2016 (when the final rule goes into effect,) until March, 2019. In a call between The Arc staff and DOL and it’s Wage and Hour division, it was highlighted, that this non-enforcement timeframe aligns with the implementation timeline of the Home and Community Services final rule. This will allow HCBS Medicaid providers, who qualify, to prepare for the implementation.

From the DOL Website: Key Provisions of the Final Rule

The Final Rule focuses primarily on updating the salary and compensation levels needed for Executive, Administrative and Professional workers to be exempt. Specifically, the Final Rule:

  1. Sets the standard salary level at the 40th percentile of earnings of full-time salaried workers in the lowest-wage Census Region, currently the South ($913 per week; $47,476 annually for a full-year worker);
  2. Sets the total annual compensation requirement for highly compensated employees (HCE) subject to a minimal duties test to the annual equivalent of the 90th percentile of full-time salaried workers nationally ($134,004); and
  3. Establishes a mechanism for automatically updating the salary and compensation levels every three years to maintain the levels at the above percentiles and to ensure that they continue to provide useful and effective tests for exemption.

Additionally, the Final Rule amends the salary basis test to allow employers to use nondiscretionary bonuses and incentive payments (including commissions) to satisfy up to 10 percent of the new standard salary level.

DOL has released several documents for non-profits including guidance and a shorter fact sheet. Additional resources can be found on DOL’s website. DOL will also be hosting several webinars to provide additional information: register here.

Remembering Adonis Reddick

WhonPhoto_Oct5Cam1_309It is with heavy hearts we share the news that Adonis Reddick passed away last week. Adonis was an amazing and powerful advocate and we will remember him as a dear friend to The Arc.

Adonis was a powerhouse when it came to advocating for people with disabilities in St. Louis, and his work inspired change statewide. The vision of a better world for individuals with disabilities was what drove him and that was reflected in everything he did.

Adonis never sat on the sidelines, he was constantly working.  He served as a member of St. Louis Arc’s Human Rights Committee, the St. Louis Self Determination Collaborative, The Coalition on Truth in Independence, and was active Partners in Policymaking at the state level. In addition to his work with these groups he co-founded of the Association of Spanish Lake Advocates (ASLA), a group committed to an accessible world based in full inclusion. Hard to imagine that in addition to all of this he also actively pursued opportunities to speak to local governments, agencies, businesses, and community leaders to ensure that the voices of those living with a disability were heard.

His unwavering commitment and passion for his work was as infectious as his smile.  Where others saw barriers, he saw the opportunity for collaboration and change – one of the many reasons he was able to make such an impact.

Many know Adonis as the inaugural winner of The Arc’s Catalyst Award for Self-Advocate of the Year. These awards were created to recognize those who were trailblazing to make the future more inclusive.  We seek out the best of the best people and organizations making an impact of national significance.

At the awards luncheon, you could have heard a pin drop when Adonis was at the podium. He captivated us with his energy. His energy became the room’s energy when he said:

“Whatever you want in this world you can put in or take out. Together we can make change happen.”

He put everything in, and we thank him for making many great things happen.

Chapters Commemorate Martin Luther King, Jr., Day of Service and Improve Disability Inclusion Across America

Many of our chapters spent the past two months executing service projects made possible by a grant from The Corporation for National and Community Service, the federal agency that leads national Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service.

Many perceive people with disabilities as the ones in need of service – but in reality, they are often a part of civic engagement at the state, local, and national level. Chapters executed great projects, including food drives and food delivery events. Check out our new Facebook album or each chapter’s Facebook page below for highlights and pictures from each event. Thank you for participating in this wonderful opportunity with us!

  • TARC: Our local chapter in Tulsa, Oklahoma, kicked off their MLK Day of Service at a University of Tulsa basketball game. Volunteers with developmental disabilities from TARC worked with university students to accept canned food donation and transport food to the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma. In February, volunteers from the chapter also packaged food at the Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma; served meals at the Kendall Whittier Elementary School; and conducted a month-long food drive at the University of Tulsa and at the True Blue Neighbors office.
  • The Arc Big Bend: On February 15th, this Madison, Florida, chapter hosted a “free lunch” for 250 people who experience food insecurity at a local park. Volunteers with and without disabilities from the local Kiwanis club, Aktion Club, local health department, and nursing school hosted a variety of activities, including free health screenings, fire rescue demonstrations, and performances from a local boys choir.
  • The Arc of Greater Twin Cities: Our Minneapolis/St. Paul, Minnesota, chapter worked with Second Harvest Heartland Food Bank to deliver emergency food aid to at least 180 people in need. During the weekend before MLK Day, thrift stores operated by The Arc of Greater Twin Cities engaged volunteers to work at their thrift stores to collect canned food and sort clothing to be sold (the proceeds of which supported the work of The Arc of the Greater Twin Cities).
  • The Arc of the Glades: The Arc of The Glades in Belle Glade, Florida, began a joint adventure with The Church of The Harvest and Lighthouse Food Pantry to help provide food to those in need in our local community. As of February 10th, 40 volunteers with and without disabilities have given 385 hours of their time, served 2,468 meals, and distributed 5,686 bags of food to those in need.
  • The Arc of Luzerne County: Our chapter in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, partnered with the Wilkes Barre Kiwanis and Pittston Rotary Club to box food for over 150 low-income seniors at the Commission on Economic Opportunity,  a local community organization that serves people suffering from poverty on MLK Day. Since this initial event, volunteers with disabilities have been serving in the kitchen at the Commission on Economic Opportunity to help prepare 800-1000 lunches daily for low-income children in the area.
  • The Arc Nature Coast: Throughout February, volunteers with and without disabilities in Brooksville, Florida, delivered and distributed fresh fruits and veggies to nearly 300 families at four food banks in the community.
  • The Arc of the Midlands: Working with community partners, this South Carolina chapter fed close to 200 people at an event that included live music, a basketball scrimmage, and special guests including state representative Chip Huggins and Indianapolis Colts football player Kelcy Quarles.
  • The Arc of Virginia: On February 19th, volunteers and chapter staff assembled 230 meals for distribution to people in Richmond who experience food insecurity. This effort was supported by Virginia Delegate Kaye Kory, members of the Virginia General Assembly, and assembly staff.
  • The Arc of Walton County: The Arc of Walton County partnered with their local Anchor Club and The Matrix Community Outreach Center to provide food to those in need in northwest Florida.
  • Genesee Arc: This New York chapter supported volunteers with and without disabilities to conduct food drives throughout the month at twelve different community locations. The food collected was donated to 200 children in need at the United Way of Genesee County’s Backpack Program, which provides food to school-age children who experience food insecurity on the weekends.

Reflections on the State of the Union Address

By: T.J. Sutcliffe, Director of Income and Housing Policy for The Arc

Last night, Americans across the nation, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families, tuned in for President Barack Obama’s final State of the Union address.

The Arc live Tweeted, and I had the honor of representing The Arc at the White House for the State of the Union Social live-viewing.

Here are five highlights that people with I/DD and their families will want to know about:

  • Remembering San Bernardino — One of President Obama’s guests at ‪SOTU was Ryan Reese, partner to Larry “Daniel” Kaufman who was one of the 14 victims of the December 2 attack at Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, CA. Daniel was a job coach for people with disabilities who lost his life after saving four people. As we tuned in to SOTU, our hearts were with Ryan, Daniel, and all of the victims in San Bernardino, their families, loved ones, and community.
  • Disability affects us all, and we are stronger together — At the White House, Vice President Joe Biden kicked off the SOTU watch party. In his remarks, the Vice President shared an inspiring story about the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) highlighting the need for us all to work together. After now-deceased Senator Jesse Helms (R-NC) rejected a precursor of the ADA, then-Senator Biden was very angry with Senator Helms and thought the worst of him. But then he learned that Senator Helms and his wife had adopted a child with a disability. The Vice President summed up, “It’s always appropriate to question another man or woman’s judgment, but it’s never appropriate to question their motive,” because you just don’t know.
  • Our lifeline: Social Security, Medicaid, Medicare and SSI — We couldn’t agree more with President Obama about this: “That’s why Social Security and Medicare are more important than ever; we shouldn’t weaken them, we should strengthen them.”
  • Lois Curtis, a disability rights champion — One of the “voices of fairness and vision, of grit and good humor and kindness that have helped America travel so far” highlighted on video as President Obama spoke was Lois Curtis, one of two named plaintiffs in the landmark ADA case Olmstead v. L.C. It was amazing to see Lois, a fierce advocate for people with disabilities, featured along with civil rights leaders like Martin Luther King, Jr., Alice Paul, and Cesar Chavez.
  • A SOTU for everyone — We thank the White House for making this the most accessible SOTU ever for people with disabilities.

What were your thoughts about the State of the Union? Share them with us on social media (Twitter & Facebook).