Highlighting the Talent of Self-Advocates in Evansville, Indiana

By Denise Seibert, Director of Development
Evansville Arc

Last month, Evansville Arc was proud to partner with The Arts Council of Southwestern Indiana to host our first ever art show in The Arts Council’s Bower-Suhrheinrich Foundation Gallery located in downtown Evansville, Indiana.  The show opened on May 10 and runs through June 12.  The show features fabric mosaics that have been completed by individuals served by our chapter, along with volunteers and staff of Evansville Arc.

The project began in 2009 as a one-time project to engage community volunteers with the clients served in our Adult Day Services program.  However, the project was such a success that we have continued work on the mosaics thanks to the help of local vendors, such as fabric stores and interior design professionals, who generously donate wall paper samples, fabric samples, scrap materials and other items.

I believe our President,  Deidra R. Conner, described the project best when she said “This project truly demonstrates that the love of art is universal and that everyone – regardless of physical or cognitive abilities – has talents or gifts that should be shared with others.”

Description of pieces

Freedom of Religion“Freedom of Religion.”

This mosaic represents the right for all people to practice their religion or beliefs. Seclusion of individuals with disabilities in the past and societal attitudes impeded their ability to express and practice their religion or beliefs. Many individuals with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities indicate that being able to participate in worship services of their choosing greatly enhances their lives.

Beverly attended church with her sister before her sister passed away. With supports, Beverly is now able to attend religious services. ““I’m happy to go to church.  I haven’t been since my sister died.  I really miss the music & want to sing.” – Beverly W.


Freedom of Expression“Freedom of Expression.”

This mosaic represents the right to speak openly and fully without fear of undue criticism or punishment. Too often, persons with disabilities have not been given the opportunity to speak for themselves. Due to social and cultural attitudes, their opinions were not always given the same value as those without disabilities and their efforts to speak up were stifled. Individuals with disabilities have much to say and are encouraged to speak up about issues that impact their lives and their community.

“I am able to speak my mind and follow what’s in my heart”- Matt B


Right to Access“Right to Access”

This mosaic represents the right of freedom of movement in the community. Freedom of movement is two-fold: being allowed to be a part of one’s community and being able to access it. In the past, persons with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities were encouraged to be placed in institutions and hidden from the rest of society. They were not able to attend public schools and take part in the daily activities such as employment, shopping, using recreational facilities, etc.  Prior to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) even if they were allowed to participate, many individuals with disabilities were limited due to physical or other barriers. Today we are seeing more and more individuals with disabilities contributing to their communities as employees, volunteers and taxpayers as they are given opportunities and reasonable accommodations.

“The best thing about getting my job is that I’m earning my own money and I now have responsibilities. Having responsibilities is the important thing, like showing up for work and being on time.” – Nathan B.