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Immunization Month – Not Just for Kids

August has been recognized by the CDC as National Immunization Month. During this month they are striving to inform individuals about the importance of immunizations, not only for children, but throughout an individual’s lifespan as well. The week of August 24 – 30, designated Not Just For Kids, specifically tries to reach out to adults about maintaining their health with proper immunizations. Immunizations are especially recommended for those adults with chronic conditions (for example asthma), diabetes or heart disease, which studies have proven to all be more prevalent in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Many individuals with IDD may live in a residential housing program with other peers or attend a day program – this increases their daily exposure to other individual’s germs and bacteria making it even more important that they keep up to date with necessary immunizations.

For an individual with IDD that already has many other chronic conditions present contracting the flu, pneumonia, whooping cough, etc. can be very hard to fight off as well as being a large financial strain if hospitalization, follow up medications, etc. is required.

One vaccine that is most commonly discussed for adults is the Influenza, or flu, vaccine. It’s recommended to get a flu vaccine every year to build immunity against the illness. The other highly recommended vaccination is the Td (tetanus) shot, which is recommended every ten years for adults (starting after the age of about 19 years old). To avoid getting the tetanus bacteria it is also recommended to make sure to thoroughly clean all wounds and cuts to get all dirt and bacteria out. This will also help to reduce the chances of getting any other bacterial infections as well.

Other vaccines can help prevent against certain cancers, Hepatitis A & B, measles, mumps, and pertussis (also called whooping cough). In past years there has been an increase in the outbreaks of whooping cough in the US. In just the state of Wisconsin they reported over 7,000 cases of whooping cough from 2011 to 2013 and 48,000 cases nationwide in 2012. It is unsure what has recently caused this increase, but making sure that everyone is up-to-date on all recommended vaccinations will help to reduce future outbreaks.

Vaccinations are not the same for everyone. They can depend on an individual’s age, occupation, genetics, potential exposure to harmful diseases and germs, and other pre-existing health conditions the individual may have. So next time you’re at the doctor make sure to talk to him/her about which vaccinations are recommended for the ones you care for and make sure to keep them up to date in the future.

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