Building Financial Literacy and Building Acceptance

In April, we mark both Autism Acceptance Month and National Financial Literacy Month. Since we celebrate them together, let’s focus on how increasing financial literacy promotes acceptance and inclusion of people with autism and other intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

Economic self-sufficiency is one of the goals of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), along with equality of opportunity, full participation, and independent living. As we approach the 25th anniversary of the ADA in July, we still have a long way to go to achieve the goal of economic self-sufficiency. Nearly one in three people with disabilities age 18 to 64 lives in poverty, more than twice the rate of working age people with no disability (DeNavas-Walt & Proctor, 2014). Correcting that financial disparity will require a lot of hard work on many fronts.

One step that we can take in our communities is to make training available to increase financial literacy of people with disabilities and their family members. As a part of its Real Economic Impact Network, the National Disability Institute has created the Financial Education Toolkit that includes an array of tools and resources to promote financial literacy education. These tools teach core concepts in areas such as understanding what money is, budgeting and spending responsibly, and establishing and working towards financial goals.

As we improve financial literacy, we also need to work with people with I/DD and their family members to put those concepts to work in a way that improves their individual financial situations. The Center for Future Planning provides critical information that people with I/DD and their families can use to stabilize their financial situations now and to plan for the future.  The Center provides families with resources on what public benefits are available and how to organize private funds in Special Needs Trusts and ABLE Accounts without putting public benefits at risk. ABLE accounts are not yet available, but we expect they will be soon in many states.

To participate in all aspects of community life, people with I/DD need financial resources. Even as April comes to an end, it’s important to continue developing ways to help people with I/DD and their families develop financial skills and build financial resources. Moving towards economic self-sufficiency is moving towards acceptance.

Building Vocational Success at The Arc of Carroll County

April is Autism Acceptance Month, and in honor of the launch of The Arc’s new initiative TalentScout, we at The Arc of Carroll County wanted to highlight some of the programs we are implementing to improve the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in the workforce.

 

Preparing for Success

The Arc of Carroll CountyFor the past 16 years, The Arc of Carroll County has had several educational partnerships to provide support to high school students and students in the Post-Secondary Program. One of these is VOICE, which teaches how to work with others, understanding the role of a job coach, and employer expectations. Another, TCP, focuses on the school-to-work transition and consists of locating job leads, filling out applications, interviewing, and being independent on the job.

Over the summer, we offer the Summer Youth Employment program for eligible high school and post-secondary participants. Through the program, participants have the opportunity to work in community businesses over the summer with the support of a job coach. This is paid employment, and plans are person-centered to identify unique supports for each person served.

A service we offer specifically for adults on the spectrum is Job Hunters. Coursework covers developing job skills, cover letter and resume writing, dressing for success, and other abilities. While the class itself is 10 weeks, it doesn’t end there! After the course is done, we continue to work with you until you become successfully employed. Last year, we successfully helped a student named Conner develop his skills and secure a job at the Westminster Home Goods for the holiday season. Now, Conner has made huge strides (all the way across the world!) and is residing in Japan looking for work teaching English to Japanese students.

 

Continued Support

The services don’t stop once someone has found employment. If specialized skills are required, we provide customized training to meet individualized employer needs. Program Coordinators and Employment specialists continue to work with individuals to liaise between the employee and employer to optimize vocational success.

Our Vocational Program, which follows a Place-Train-Maintain model, provides support, instruction, training, and supervision if necessary to maximize independence in the workplace. Some of the ways we do this are through job sampling, shadowing, and enclaves. One of the most unique parts of this program is Supported Enterprise, which assists individuals who are interested in starting their own small business through developing business plans and identifying funding sources. Our hope is that these participants may one day end up at Entrepreneur Alley during The Arc’s National Convention.

We believe that everyone has a right to meaningful and gainful employment, and that community services through The Arc’s chapters are a paramount tool in achieving this.

Learn How HealthMeet® is Promoting Healthy Lives!

In 2012, The Arc launched the HealthMeet® project because we believe people with intellectual disabilities (ID) should have access to high quality, comprehensive, and affordable health care. HealthMeet® offers free community-based health assessments to people with ID at selected chapters in California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. Over 1,500 people have been assessed through the HealthMeet initiative and 9 percent of those participants reported to have an autism spectrum disorder. At The Arc, we believe that Autism Acceptance is promoting healthy lifestyles.

Overall, HealthMeet® has been a positive experience for participants and chapters of The Arc involved in the project. The health assessments provide an opportunity for participants to be assessed in the areas of vital signs and body composition, respiratory health, vision, hearing, oral health, and foot and mobility issues. Participants also feel empowered to take charge of their health by engaging in dialogue with health assessors about the status of their health and recommendations for follow-up care. As Erika Hagensen of The Arc of North Carolina has noted “health is not a taboo topic, it’s an empowering topic.”

The chapters of The Arc involved in HealthMeet® have leveraged community resources and developed partnerships with local entities such as public health departments, nursing schools, and medical schools. HealthMeet® has also been a learning experience for many of the healthcare professionals that conduct the health assessments because they now feel more equipped to serve people with ID. Through HealthMeet®, healthcare providers have developed better communication skills that will ultimately help them serve the participant’s healthcare needs.

To learn more about how The Arc is increasing health opportunities for people with ID view this video:

If you are a healthcare provider, national organization of healthcare providers, caregiver, chapter of The Arc, or service provider (not affiliated with The Arc), we ask that you join our effort to increase your knowledge of the I/DD community and serve people with I/DD. Learn more by viewing this video:

HealthMeet aims to reduce health disparities experienced by people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (I/DD) so they can live a longer and healthier life. Through free health assessments and training, HealthMeet helps people with I/DD learn about their health needs. HealthMeet also offers training to improve public, health professional, and caregiver awareness of health issues faced by people with I/DD. HealthMeet is supported through at $1 million cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For more information on the HealthMeet project, contact Jennifer Sladen at sladen@thearc.org.

Supporting The Age Wave: Baby Boomers and Autism

Since 2010, baby boomers in the United States have been turning 65 at the rate of approximately 10,000 a day. Some of these new baby boomers are people with autism. At the same time, over 3.5 million adults with autism and other developmental disabilities are living with family members. In nearly 25 percent of these households, the family caregivers are over 60 years of age. During Autism Acceptance month, we should address the challenges that the age wave creates for people with autism and their family members.

To start, people with autism over the age of 65 should learn about benefits that may be available to them in the disability and aging service systems. Learn about what public benefits the person with autism may be eligible for and apply for the appropriate benefits. In addition, Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) can help you access services and support available to seniors. AAAs offer a variety of home and community-based services such as respite, meals on wheels, and transportation. Visit www.ncoa.org for more information about additional benefits available to seniors.

Supporting aging parents of people with autism is another critical issue that needs to be addressed. In addition to the health and financial issues that all seniors face, caregivers are often overwhelmed by concern about what the future will look like for their son or daughter once they can no longer provide support. Although planning for the future can be challenging and emotional, it is necessary and possible.

Discussing these major life transitions and putting a plan in place may actually alleviate some of the stress experienced by adults with autism, their caregivers, and other family members. The Arc’s Center for Future Planning offers information and resources to adults with I/DD, aging caregivers, and other family members.

During Autism Acceptance Month, here are some ways you can access more help:

 

The Arc’s Center for Future Planning aims to support and encourage adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families to plan for the future. The Center provides reliable information and practical assistance to individuals with I/DD, their family members and friends, professionals who support them and other members of the community on areas such as person-centered planning, decision-making, housing options, and financial planning. Visit the Center’s website at futureplanning.thearc.org for more information.

Autism Acceptance – Accept Me, Not A Label

Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman

Autism is not something to be feared, nor is it solely defined by medical jargon or categories. It needs to be accepted as the way an individual thinks, feels, and expresses themselves; nothing more, nothing less. An individual who happens to have a diagnosis needs to be accepted as a human being first and foremost. The expression of their autism may come in many forms and whatever that may look like, it needs to be accepted as part of the person and part of what motivates them.

If we start by accepting autism as part of the person and not let their autism be what defines them, then we can be free to be who we want to be. I have taken on the challenge and embraced my autism. I do not let it run my life; therefore, I have broken some barriers and set an example that individuals on the autism spectrum can be accepted for who they are and what they can contribute to society. Let’s celebrate not only acceptance but that autism is not a disability but differently abled. Think positive and find unique solutions to problems, always remember this; there is more than one way to do things and no one correct way to do something. By accepting autism, individuals are embracing and empowering themselves to be who they always knew they would be.

Ever since my diagnosis, in my mid 30’s, I have learned so much about myself and how it is possible to influence others just by being there and listening. Sharing my story has made such a difference in my life and now I have a new found talent that I would like to tell others about. As part of my job as Director of Autism Now, I was a contributor for Talent Scout, our toolkit for employers, that reflects the opinions and voices of people on the spectrum. I will also be available to do consulting services as well. That will include such things as being a public speaker at conferences, giving presentations, being a leader in the autism community, as well as telephone or e-mail consultations. For more information on that I can always be found at agoodman@autismnow.org, info@autismnow.org, or 202-600-3489.

Acceptance is what it’s all about – accepting someone for who they are, for the difference they can make in someone’s life, and accepting them as a human being first. Always a person first and never a label or diagnosis; don’t fix what isn’t broken, let the person with autism tell you what they need and want, and always let them make their own choices for themselves. That’s what it means to accept autism, being free and being me.

 

Amy Goodman, M.A.

Amy Goodman is currently the Director of Autism Now at The Arc of the United States. She has an undergraduate degree in Early Childhood Education and a Master’s degree in Special Education with a minor in autism. She is an individual on the autism spectrum who enjoys helping others to understand what it is like to live with a developmental disability and has a passion for helping others in their journeys with their children with unique abilities to live life to the fullest as independently as possible. She likes to be a self-advocate and fight for the rights of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities as time permits. She also has a passion for reading, crossword puzzles, square dancing, and parrots and owls.