Building Financial Literacy and Building Acceptance

In April, we mark both Autism Acceptance Month and National Financial Literacy Month. Since we celebrate them together, let’s focus on how increasing financial literacy promotes acceptance and inclusion of people with autism and other intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

Economic self-sufficiency is one of the goals of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), along with equality of opportunity, full participation, and independent living. As we approach the 25th anniversary of the ADA in July, we still have a long way to go to achieve the goal of economic self-sufficiency. Nearly one in three people with disabilities age 18 to 64 lives in poverty, more than twice the rate of working age people with no disability (DeNavas-Walt & Proctor, 2014). Correcting that financial disparity will require a lot of hard work on many fronts.

One step that we can take in our communities is to make training available to increase financial literacy of people with disabilities and their family members. As a part of its Real Economic Impact Network, the National Disability Institute has created the Financial Education Toolkit that includes an array of tools and resources to promote financial literacy education. These tools teach core concepts in areas such as understanding what money is, budgeting and spending responsibly, and establishing and working towards financial goals.

As we improve financial literacy, we also need to work with people with I/DD and their family members to put those concepts to work in a way that improves their individual financial situations. The Center for Future Planning provides critical information that people with I/DD and their families can use to stabilize their financial situations now and to plan for the future.  The Center provides families with resources on what public benefits are available and how to organize private funds in Special Needs Trusts and ABLE Accounts without putting public benefits at risk. ABLE accounts are not yet available, but we expect they will be soon in many states.

To participate in all aspects of community life, people with I/DD need financial resources. Even as April comes to an end, it’s important to continue developing ways to help people with I/DD and their families develop financial skills and build financial resources. Moving towards economic self-sufficiency is moving towards acceptance.

Learn How HealthMeet® is Promoting Healthy Lives!

In 2012, The Arc launched the HealthMeet® project because we believe people with intellectual disabilities (ID) should have access to high quality, comprehensive, and affordable health care. HealthMeet® offers free community-based health assessments to people with ID at selected chapters in California, Massachusetts, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Pennsylvania. Over 1,500 people have been assessed through the HealthMeet initiative and 9 percent of those participants reported to have an autism spectrum disorder. At The Arc, we believe that Autism Acceptance is promoting healthy lifestyles.

Overall, HealthMeet® has been a positive experience for participants and chapters of The Arc involved in the project. The health assessments provide an opportunity for participants to be assessed in the areas of vital signs and body composition, respiratory health, vision, hearing, oral health, and foot and mobility issues. Participants also feel empowered to take charge of their health by engaging in dialogue with health assessors about the status of their health and recommendations for follow-up care. As Erika Hagensen of The Arc of North Carolina has noted “health is not a taboo topic, it’s an empowering topic.”

The chapters of The Arc involved in HealthMeet® have leveraged community resources and developed partnerships with local entities such as public health departments, nursing schools, and medical schools. HealthMeet® has also been a learning experience for many of the healthcare professionals that conduct the health assessments because they now feel more equipped to serve people with ID. Through HealthMeet®, healthcare providers have developed better communication skills that will ultimately help them serve the participant’s healthcare needs.

To learn more about how The Arc is increasing health opportunities for people with ID view this video:

If you are a healthcare provider, national organization of healthcare providers, caregiver, chapter of The Arc, or service provider (not affiliated with The Arc), we ask that you join our effort to increase your knowledge of the I/DD community and serve people with I/DD. Learn more by viewing this video:

HealthMeet aims to reduce health disparities experienced by people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (I/DD) so they can live a longer and healthier life. Through free health assessments and training, HealthMeet helps people with I/DD learn about their health needs. HealthMeet also offers training to improve public, health professional, and caregiver awareness of health issues faced by people with I/DD. HealthMeet is supported through at $1 million cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. For more information on the HealthMeet project, contact Jennifer Sladen at sladen@thearc.org.

Autism Acceptance – Accept Me, Not A Label

Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman

Autism is not something to be feared, nor is it solely defined by medical jargon or categories. It needs to be accepted as the way an individual thinks, feels, and expresses themselves; nothing more, nothing less. An individual who happens to have a diagnosis needs to be accepted as a human being first and foremost. The expression of their autism may come in many forms and whatever that may look like, it needs to be accepted as part of the person and part of what motivates them.

If we start by accepting autism as part of the person and not let their autism be what defines them, then we can be free to be who we want to be. I have taken on the challenge and embraced my autism. I do not let it run my life; therefore, I have broken some barriers and set an example that individuals on the autism spectrum can be accepted for who they are and what they can contribute to society. Let’s celebrate not only acceptance but that autism is not a disability but differently abled. Think positive and find unique solutions to problems, always remember this; there is more than one way to do things and no one correct way to do something. By accepting autism, individuals are embracing and empowering themselves to be who they always knew they would be.

Ever since my diagnosis, in my mid 30’s, I have learned so much about myself and how it is possible to influence others just by being there and listening. Sharing my story has made such a difference in my life and now I have a new found talent that I would like to tell others about. As part of my job as Director of Autism Now, I was a contributor for Talent Scout, our toolkit for employers, that reflects the opinions and voices of people on the spectrum. I will also be available to do consulting services as well. That will include such things as being a public speaker at conferences, giving presentations, being a leader in the autism community, as well as telephone or e-mail consultations. For more information on that I can always be found at agoodman@autismnow.org, info@autismnow.org, or 202-600-3489.

Acceptance is what it’s all about – accepting someone for who they are, for the difference they can make in someone’s life, and accepting them as a human being first. Always a person first and never a label or diagnosis; don’t fix what isn’t broken, let the person with autism tell you what they need and want, and always let them make their own choices for themselves. That’s what it means to accept autism, being free and being me.

 

Amy Goodman, M.A.

Amy Goodman is currently the Director of Autism Now at The Arc of the United States. She has an undergraduate degree in Early Childhood Education and a Master’s degree in Special Education with a minor in autism. She is an individual on the autism spectrum who enjoys helping others to understand what it is like to live with a developmental disability and has a passion for helping others in their journeys with their children with unique abilities to live life to the fullest as independently as possible. She likes to be a self-advocate and fight for the rights of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities as time permits. She also has a passion for reading, crossword puzzles, square dancing, and parrots and owls.