The Arc Responds to the Violence in Charlottesville

Washington DC – The Arc released the following statement in response to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia:

“Our collective hearts break after witnessing the hatred, violence, and innocent death that rocked Charlottesville, Virginia this past weekend. This hatred does not represent our America; it is a shocking betrayal of the values of our nation. We are sickened by the neo-Nazis and white supremacists who brought hate and violence into the streets, and appalled that President Trump chose to place blame not only on them, but on those who were protesting against this resurgence of evil in our society.  The counter protesters who stood up for the inclusion that America was founded upon are not responsible for what happened – it was those resorting to violence while spewing racist, anti-Semitic, homophobic, and islamophobic vitriol who were at fault.

“People with intellectual and developmental disabilities have faced decades of abuse, discrimination, and institutionalization.   We must not forget that the genocide perpetrated by the Nazis in Germany included among its targets those with disabilities, and that eugenic sterilization was practiced here in the United States.  The occurrences of this weekend remind us of dark times in our history, and of the hate and ignorance that fueled these deplorable actions. That hate was alive this weekend.

“Disability does not discriminate and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities are represented in all minority groups: people of color, immigrants, refugees, members of every religious group, and members of the LGBTQ community. We remain on the side of inclusion, on the side of our brothers and sisters in civil rights who were brutally attacked in Charlottesville,” said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc.

Grant from Walmart Foundation Will Allow The Arc to Support People with Disabilities in Building Fulfilling Careers

Washington, DC – The Arc is thrilled to announce it has received an additional $240,000 from the Walmart Foundation to encourage and support workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) to enter the workforce. Current research indicates that only 15% of people with I/DD are currently employed. However, with the right supports, many people with I/DD can build a career alongside their peers without disabilities.

“With the Walmart Foundation’s generous support in 2016, The Arc@Work was able to significantly increase the number of individuals with I/DD working in the community. Now, with this additional funding, The Arc and its chapters are excited to further narrow the workforce gap between people with I/DD and their colleagues without disabilities,” said Peter Berns, CEO, The Arc.

The Arc’s employment initiative, The Arc@Work, connects organizations with people and services that increase the diversity, productivity, and quality of their overall workforce. In 2016, the program partnered with 16 chapters of The Arc to connect employers with talented employees with I/DD. With the Walmart Foundation’s support, these chapters were able to reach and even surpass many of their objectives. By June 2017, nearly 400 individuals with I/DD had secured employment, while 15 states and over 1,700 employers were engaged in outreach. The year also produced many success stories, such as this one from The Arc of Monroe County in Rochester, New York.

When Danielle first began receiving employment services, she exhibited low self-confidence and struggled with social interactions ranging from phone calls to interviews. As she began to take part in her first career fair, job interviews, and informal meetings with potential employers, her confidence started to grow. Through practice and dedication to the process, she was able to overcome the stress and anxiety associated with interacting with potential employers.

Eventually Danielle received a call for an interview at a local senior facility that would result in a pivotal change in her life’s course. The day before she was scheduled to interview, Danielle and her employment specialist practiced answering hypothetical interview questions and how to talk about her qualifications. The following day, Danielle performed flawlessly. Danielle engaged the interviewer in a funny story and her demeanor and the content of her answers to the interview questions were on point.

The following week Danielle was offered a job, and she has been working at the senior facility now for 7 months. Danielle is excellent at her job and has an impressive work pace. She is organized and efficient and her coworkers love to be scheduled to work with her because of her amazing work ethic. In late June, Danielle’s astounding professional and personal growth was recognized at an awards ceremony sponsored by The Arc of Monroe County. When asked how the job has changed her life, Danielle simply replied, “It feels rewarding to be working!”

The Arc of Monroe County’s Tammy Reynolds couldn’t agree more: “The Arc@Work is a valued partner promoting workforce diversity for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

The Arc on Defeat of Senate Health Care Bill: “Never underestimate the power of the disability community, who took on this civil rights fight for themselves and future generations”

Washington, DC – The Arc released the following statement following the defeat of the Health Care Freedom Act in the United States Senate:

“Never underestimate the power of the disability community, who took on this civil rights fight for themselves and future generations.

“The defeat of this disastrous health care bill is a huge win for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. The Arc thanks all Senators who voted against this bill. Medicaid and the home and community based services and supports program funds are safe, for now.

“Make no mistake – we still have work to do. This year, Congress and the Administration have put on the table over a trillion dollars in cuts to the program, and so the threats remain, whether they resurface in another health care bill, a tax bill, or at any time. Last night, 49 Senators voted for more than $200 billion in Medicaid cuts, and to strip 16 million individuals of their health insurance. Just a few months ago, the House passed legislation that included over $800 billion in cuts to Medicaid, and to take health insurance away from 22 million people. Each vote in favor of these cuts devalued the lives and rights of people with disabilities in our nation. States would have been forced to cut people from the Medicaid rolls or to substantially reduce services; home and community based services were at greatest risk. This harmful bill was crafted behind closed doors, in a disgraceful process that showed a callous disregard for the lives at stake.

“So the work of our movement continues. Advocates across the country will reach out to their Senators and Representatives to thank those who opposed this approach, voice their concerns about threats to Medicaid, and continue to educate elected officials about why Medicaid matters to them,” said Peter Berns, CEO, The Arc.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

This Week is the 52nd Anniversary of Medicaid and Medicare: The Irony of Celebration During Times of Attack

By: Nicole Jorwic, Director of Rights Policy

This week in July is always a big one, this year the disability community came together to celebrate the 27th anniversary of the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act and the 52nd anniversary of the Medicaid and Medicare programs. But a large looming shadow hung over these celebrations, the current healthcare proposals in the House and Senate.

Nicole speaking at the Medicaid CelebrationDuring the past six months, most of my professional life has been consumed by the fight to save Medicaid. Today I was honored to speak as a sibling and professional at a Capitol Hill event celebrating the 52nd anniversary of Medicaid and Medicare, to highlight why we must continue our fight to SAVE MEDICAID.

My Remarks:

My name is Nicole Jorwic, I am the Director of Rights Policy at The Arc of the United States. The Arc promotes and protects the human rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and actively supports their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes.

I am here today though, as a sister. My brother Chris will be 28 years old tomorrow and has autism, he is the reason that I do the work that I do, and as a Medicaid recipient, he is one of the millions of individuals at risk if the proposals in the House and Senate healthcare reform bills become law.

Chris and Nicole We know the numbers – between 22-32 million will lose coverage, millions will lose Medicaid and anywhere from $202 billion (in the “skinny repeal”) to $836 billion (in the House bill) in cuts to federal Medicaid spending. But those numbers represent people, they represent Chris, they represent the 43 heroes from National ADAPT that were arrested last month after staging a die in at Senator McConnell’s office.

That’s right, a die in because Medicaid is literally life and death for people with disabilities. I was lucky enough to be there in solidarity with National ADAPT last month and as I watched people who I respect and admire being pulled from the wheelchairs they use, literally putting their bodies on the line for people like Chris, I wept.

The current proposals quite simply devalue groups of human beings, gutting the Medicaid program, a program that over 10 million people with disabilities and families like mine rely on, and they show that the drafters of this legislation don’t see the value in investing in the lives of the poor, the aging population, pregnant women, people with disabilities, including my Chrissy.

Medicaid is so much more than a health program, it funds long term supports and services that allow people with disabilities to live their full life in the community. Medicaid funded the communication device that gave my nonverbal brother a voice, so that he can advocate for himself. Medicaid funds the day support services that allow my mom, a college professor, and my dad, a small business owner, to remain in their jobs.

SiblingsFamilies like mine started The Arc over 65 years ago to get people OUT of Institutions and included in their communities, and now those antiquated and segregating services may be the only thing left. This is because institutions and nursing homes remain mandatory services, while home and community based services are optional, and will therefore be the first cut when the devastating federal cuts to Medicaid come to the states. We cannot let that happen, we must SAVE MEDICAID. People’s lives literally depend on it. Chris’ does.

The proposals to decimate the Medicaid program to provide tax cuts to corporations and the wealthy is morally reprehensible. As an advocate and Chris’ sister I will do everything I can to stop the current healthcare bills and protect the integrity of the Medicaid program that we are here celebrating today.

The Arc on Motion to Proceed in Senate: “All roads from this vote are bad for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities”

Washington, DC – The Arc released the following statement on Senate passage of a motion to proceed that starts debate on health care legislation that will impact Medicaid:

“Today, a majority of Senators ignored the pleas of their constituents and moved ahead with debating disastrous health care proposals that will result in people losing health care coverage and threaten the Medicaid home and community based service system.

“All roads from this vote are bad for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. One path repeals without replacing the Affordable Care Act. The Congressional Budget Office analysis showed that under that proposal, by 2026, 32 million people would lose health insurance and premiums would double.

“Another option decimates the Medicaid program, and the home and community based supports and services that people with disabilities rely on to do what many people take for granted, including getting out of bed in the morning, eating, toileting, and simply getting out into the community.

“Now is the time for action – it doesn’t matter if this is the first time someone is calling their Senators, or they’ve called them every day in this fight. This is the civil rights fight of our time, and we will remain vigilant to protect all that has been built to ensure the inclusion and equality of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in our society,” said Peter Berns, CEO, The Arc.

Evidence-Based Practices: Connecting the Dots between Research and Practice

Evidence-Based Practices: Connecting the Dots between Research and PracticeWe often hear the terms “best practice” and “evidence-based practice” used in relation to programs or policies – but what does that mean? How do we know if a practice is promising or evidence-based? A recent article, published in Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, offered perspectives on strategies to gather and evaluate evidence as well as guidelines to establish evidence-based practice. Through a collaboration with AAIDD, The Arc partnered with the lead author, Dr. Robert Schalock, to develop a brief to educate individuals, families, and practitioners on these concepts in hopes of bridging the gap between research and practice.

Learning From Our Peers: Advice on Organizational Transformation From Those Who Have Done It

RRTC BriefAs more community-based providers of supports and services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) strive to reinvent themselves to offer inclusive opportunities and keep up with Employment First, WIOA, CMS Final Settings Rule, DOJ’s application of Olmstead to employment, and expectations of the ADA generation, organizational leadership may find themselves wondering how to accomplish such a feat. Where’s the finish line? Where’s the starting block?

The Arc believes that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities belong in the community and have fundamental moral, civil and constitutional rights to be fully included and actively participate in all aspects of society. The Arc is pleased to be working toward finding and sharing information to support its chapters on their journeys toward community employment with leading employment researchers as a sub-grantee of the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center (RRTC) on Advancing Employment for Individuals with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, a project of ThinkWork! at the Institute for Community Inclusion at University of Massachusetts – Boston on a five-year National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) grant aimed at employment of people with I/DD. As part of this collaboration, staff from The Arc co-conducted interviews with leadership from eight organizations which have transformed their employment service delivery from sheltered work to competitive community employment. A brief sharing advice from those interviews was recently released telling us to Commit. Plan. Engage. Implement.

The next step in this collaboration is an intervention aimed at service providers to aide them in transforming their sheltered workshop models to community-based employment programs. This intervention will provide best practice information and other resources to service providers via a comprehensive toolkit.

We are currently looking for chapters to participate in our intervention pilot this summer. The pilot will be six weeks in duration and will consist of reviewing the toolkit, preliminary planning and implementation of pertinent best practices, and providing feedback to The Arc national staff to ensure that the final version of the toolkit is useful and will best support organizations with implementing the conversion process. If you are interested in learning more or participating in the pilot process, please contact Jonathan Lucus, Director of The Arc@Work at: lucus@thearc.org or at 202.534.3706.

The Timeline Has Changed, But Threats to People with Disabilities in Senate Health Care Reform Efforts Remain

Washington, DC – The Arc released the following statement as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell pulls the Better Care Reconciliation Act, and announces an upcoming vote on a repeal of the Affordable Care Act without an immediate replacement:

“Make no mistake – the Medicaid program and the home and community based supports that people with intellectual and developmental disabilities rely on to live independent lives were on the brink of destruction. As the disability community battled against this effort over the last several months, we have shown our strength, our power, and I thank each and every advocate who has stepped up in this fight.

“This is not over. As Senate Majority Leader McConnell considers his next steps regarding repeal of the Affordable Care Act, we are reminded of the 2015 plan to repeal and not replace the Affordable Care Act. The Congressional Budget Office analysis showed that under that proposal, by 2026, 32 million people would lose health insurance and premiums would double.

“We know there will be further threats in the future, which is why we remain vigilant in our advocacy efforts. Congress is already doubling down on slashing the Medicaid program – today, the House unveiled its budget resolution that includes sweeping changes to Medicaid, Social Security, and Medicare.

“This is going to be a long road, but one that people with disabilities, their family members, support staff, and friends will navigate together. We must unite and reject cuts that will take away the dignity and independence of people with disabilities. This is the civil rights fight of our time, and we will remain vigilant to protect all that has been built to ensure the inclusion and equality of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in our society,” said Peter Berns, CEO, The Arc.

Emergency Weekend Medicaid Matters to Me Letter Writing Campaign – Deadline Extended!

The Senate is set to vote soon on the latest version of the Better Care Reconciliation Act. The latest revisions to the bill do NOT change the devastating cuts to the Medicaid program that over 10 million people with disabilities rely on to live and work in their communities. The time is now to take action and tell your Senators why Medicaid Matters to You and Your Family

Take a few moments to write a brief message about how Medicaid impacts your life. Please send those messages in the body of an email to Nicole Jorwic at The Arc of the United States: jorwic@thearc.org. PLEASE INCLUDE YOUR STATE IN THE SUBJECT LINE OF THE EMAIL. We will hand deliver all the printed messages to the Senators from your states this week. So please act fast, e-mails must be received by midnight on Wednesday, July 19 to be printed.

We want to show strong support for Medicaid from all over the nation, but we are particularly looking for letters from the following states:

  • Nevada
  • West Virginia
  • Alaska
  • Louisiana
  • Ohio
  • Arizona
  • North Dakota
  • Kansas

The Arc Warns that the Senate Republican Health Care Legislation Continues to Pose a Severe Threat to People with Disabilities

Washington, DC – The Arc released the following statement following the release of the updated Senate Republicans’ health care legislation discussion draft:

“A new draft, new talking points, same devastating impact on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. It is disheartening to know that Senators were in their districts for the last week, yet the pleas of their constituents with disabilities have been ignored with the latest draft of this legislation. This response to the extensive and impressive outreach from the disability community is an insult to people with disabilities and their families.

“The Better Care Reconciliation Act is an assault on people with disabilities and we implore Senators to do the right thing and oppose this bill. A vote in favor of this bill is a vote against the progress of the disability rights movement and constituents who rely on Medicaid for their independence,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

On June 22, 2017, the Senate Budget Committee released a discussion draft of health care reform legislation, the “Better Care Reconciliation Act of 2017” (“Senate bill”). The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released an analysis of the cost of the bill and the impact on health care coverage. CBO found that at least 22 million fewer individuals would have health care coverage by 2026. CBO also found that the Senate bill cuts Medicaid by $772 billion over 10 years, but the most severe cuts do not begin to take effect until 2025. Starting in 2025, the cuts are billions more than the cuts in the House bill and would increase significantly over time. CBO found that, compared to current law, Medicaid would decrease by 35% in 2036.

The current discussion draft from the Senate did include a woefully inadequate home and community based four-year demonstration program for rural states.  A total of $8 billion is available over four years.  In contrast, the discussion draft retains the $19 billion dollar cut made to the Community First Choice Option which is a program available to any state that chooses the option with no end date.
The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.