Congress Must Reauthorize CHIP Now with Bipartisan Support for Funding

The Arc supports the House of Representatives’ bipartisan policy agreement to extend the funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). CHIP is critical to providing health insurance to over 9 million children in the United States and has helped to reduce the uninsured population of children to historic low levels. It is urgent that Congress act to extend the funding for CHIP before states exhaust current funding. If the program expires, states will be forced to send notifications to families about pending loss of health insurance coverage for their children. These notifications and the potential loss of health coverage will create anxiety and concern among families who depend on CHIP for affordable health insurance coverage.

The Arc is concerned that the House is preparing to move forward with bipartisan agreement on the policy but strong disagreement on provisions for how the bill will be paid for. On principle, The Arc does not support provisions that pay for bills that hurt Medicaid or Medicare beneficiaries or beneficiaries of other important programs when extending equally critical programs. We urge the House of Representatives to continue to seek provisions with bipartisan support to pay for the CHIP funding extension. It is critical that Congress act to maintain this program and ensure that children continue to have access to the health insurance they depend on.

The Arc and the Walmart Foundation: A Successful Year in Assisting People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Find Jobs in the Community

A year ago, The Arc announced the exciting news that it had been awarded $245,000 by the Walmart Foundation to support workers with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) to enter the workforce. The Arc@Work, The Arc’s employment program, quickly got to work with chapters from around the country to make a dent in the unemployment rate for people with I/DD, one job placement at a time.

Shortly after acquiring the grant, The Arc awarded 16 of its chapters subgrants. Each grantee was then charged with developing innovative programs that place job-seekers with I/DD in competitive, integrated employment within their communities. Chapters included were UCP Seguin (IL); The Arc of the Midlands (SC); The Arc of Spokane (WA); The Arc of Anchorage (AK); The Arc of Montgomery County (MD); The Arc of El Paso (TX); The Arc of Monroe County (NY); St. Louis Arc (MO); The Arc of Chester County (PA); Berkshire County Arc (MA); Star, Inc. (CT); The Arc of North Carolina (NC); The Arc Davidson County and Greater Nashville (TN); VersAbility (VA); The Arc of Bristol County (MA); and ADEC (IN). By the end of the grant cycle, The Arc had reached and even surpassed many of the grant’s objectives. As of September 2017, nearly 480 workers with disabilities had secured employment at nearly 360 companies under the program. Additionally, nearly 1,240 individuals with I/DD had undergone training to better prepare them to enter the workforce. Several success stories emerged as the year progressed, including this one about a self-advocate named Danielle from The Arc of Monroe County in Rochester, New York:

When Danielle first began employment services, she exhibited low self-confidence. And throughout the job development process, Danielle struggled with social interactions ranging from phone calls to interviews. As she experienced her first career fair, job interview, and informal meetings with potential employers, her confidence started to grow.

Eventually Danielle received a call for an interview at a local senior facility that would result in a pivotal change in her life’s course. The day before she was scheduled to interview, Danielle and her employment specialist practiced interview questions. The following day, Danielle was stellar during the interview process and performed the best she ever had! Her employment specialist knew when they walked out of the building that she would be offered the job. Danielle was able to engage the interviewer in a funny story and her demeanor and the content of her answers were on point. The following week Danielle was offered a job!

Danielle has been working at the senior facility now for 10 months. Her transformation has been incredible. In late June, Danielle’s astounding professional and personal growth was recognized at an awards ceremony sponsored by The Arc of Monroe County.

Based on this year’s achievement, The Arc was awarded an additional round of funding this past spring. With this support, The Arc hopes to build upon the success it began in 2016.

Health Care Open Enrollment

2018 Open Enrollment:

November 1, 2017
Open enrollment begins

December 15, 2017
Open enrollment ends

January 1, 2018
Coverage begins

If you’re uninsured or looking for more affordable health insurance, the open enrollment period is the time to visit healthcare.gov or your state’s marketplace or health insurance exchange. During open enrollment, private health insurance options can be reviewed and coverage can be purchased. People with low and moderate incomes may be able to get financial help to pay for health insurance coverage. Assistance to pay for premiums and other cost-sharing may be available for individuals and families, depending on which plan is purchased. If you get health insurance through your employer, Medicaid or Medicare, you are not eligible for this assistance.

You can also sign up for insurance outside of the open enrollment period, under certain circumstances such as losing your job, getting married, divorced or having a baby. You may enroll in Medicaid and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) at any time, year around.

Do all states have the same open enrollment dates?

No. Some states have a longer enrollment periods. States with different ones are listed below:

California: Nov. 1, 2017 – Jan. 31, 2018

Colorado: Nov. 1, 2017 – Jan. 12, 2018

Connecticut: Nov. 1, 2017 – Dec. 22, 2017

DC: Nov. 1, 2017 — Jan. 31, 2018

Massachusetts: Nov. 1, 2017 – Jan. 23, 2018

Minnesota: Nov. 1, 2017 – Jan. 14, 2018

New York: Nov. 1, 2017 — Jan. 31, 2018

Rhode Island: Nov. 1, 2017 – Dec. 31, 2017

Washington: Nov. 1, 2017 — Jan. 15, 2018

 

If you have a disability or a health condition, details or possible changes matter. Ask:

  • Are a broad range of health care providers included in the health plan’s network of providers?
  • Are there enough medical specialists in the network to meet your needs?
  • Are needed medications included in the plan’s list of covered drugs?
  • Is there adequate access to non-clinical, disability-specific services and supports?
  • Does the plan have service limits, such as caps or limits on the number of office visits for therapy services?
  • Are mental health services covered to the same extent that other “physical” health benefits are covered?

I already have health insurance through the Marketplace. Do I need to do something?

It is important to update your income and household information in the Marketplace to make sure you get the assistance that is available.  

  • This is also a good time to check your health insurance coverage and see if it still meets your healthcare needs.
  • If a new plan does not cover your providers or services, seek more information about transition rights.
  • You should carefully read all health insurance notices and updates.
  • If your income has increased, updating your information with the Marketplace will help avoid paying penalties.

I and/or my family members are uninsured, can we sign up?

Most individuals will be able to get health insurance coverage regardless of pre-existing health conditions or prior denial of coverage. Interested individuals can go online, enter information and review insurance options. Information on monthly premiums, deductible costs, doctors, hospitals and which drugs are covered by a plan should be available. Enrollment is limited to individuals who live in the United States, are U.S. citizens, nationals, or non-citizens who are lawfully present, and not currently incarcerated. If you have not signed up for an insurance plan, it is important to note that you may be subject to a fee for not having health care coverage.

Where can I go to get help?

Purchasing health insurance can be complicated. If you or your family member needs assistance with understanding the options, healthcare.gov can help. Each state has health insurance “navigators” to assist individuals with enrollment in health insurance plans. Individual health plan information should be available in late October 2017 on the website.

Website: www.healthcare.gov
Phone: 1-800-318-2596 (Available 24/7 with access to 150 languages)
TTY: 1-855-889-4325
In-Person Assistance Resources: localhelp.healthcare.gov

Community Matters for ALL

By: Nicole Jorwic, Director of Rights Policy, The Arc of the United States

What is important to YOU about community living?

Share your story!

During the recent fights to save the Medicaid program from devastating cuts and fundamental restructuring, the home and community based services (HCBS) that individuals with disabilities and their families rely on were in greatest jeopardy. These services include everything from residential supports, day supports, and employment services, to personal attendant care. This is because under federal Medicaid law, HCBS are OPTIONAL while other services such as institutional services are MANDATORY. So if the cuts included in the recent health care bills would have made it down to the state level, HCBS would have been the first thing on the chopping block. This new reality would have been devastating to individuals and families.

Those HCBS dollars are the ones that, over the last several decades, have funded the desperately needed shift from institutional placements and segregated services for individuals with disabilities to a full life in their communities.

Community Matters!

I have been lucky in my life to be a part of a community that involved all individuals in every aspect of the community, including my brother Chris who has autism. Chris is 28, lives in Illinois and receives Home and Community Based Services through the Medicaid program to remain in the same community where he has lived his whole life.

Not only do HCBS benefit the individuals with disabilities who receive them to stay in their community, it benefits every community member. Because of the services that Chris receives he is able to live in his home, do things that he chooses during the day out in the community, interacting with people who do not have disabilities, and gets the support that he needs to communicate through typing. Chris has a full life, and Medicaid HCBS have made that possible. However, it is never lost on me that if Chris had been born 20 or 30 years earlier, his life would most likely look very different because of his significant level of needs. Chris would have languished in an institution, away from his family, friends and his COMMUNITY never learning to express his wants, insights and amazing sense of humor. This knowledge is why I feel so passionately about making life in the community a reality for all individuals with disabilities, no matter their level of need.

The disability community showed our strength during the fights to protect Medicaid, and now we must rise up again to show the importance of ensuring that HCBS dollars are spent in the community and not in settings that isolate individuals from interacting with all parts of their communities. We need to show that life in the community is possible for ALL! The best way to send that message is to share stories about why community matters in YOUR life, and what your life looks like in the community.

Chris has already written his own story and submitted it, please take a moment to do the same. You can enter your information here. We will use these stories to show the need to increase the investment in HCBS dollars and to ensure that capacity is built to support every individual in their communities.

Boston University Sargent College and The Arc of the United States Approved for $50,000 Funding Award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute

(Boston) – Jessica Kramer, assistant professor of occupational therapy at Boston University College of Health & Rehabilitation: Sargent College and The Arc of the United States have been approved for a $50,000 funding award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI). The award will support a project identifying the mental health research priorities of young adults with intellectual and/or developmental disabilities (I/DD).

Kramer and The Arc will use the funds provided through PCORI’s Pipeline to Proposal Awards program to build a partnership of individuals and groups who share a desire to advance patient-centered outcomes research focused on finding optimal treatment approaches for young adults with I/DD. Self-Advocates Becoming Empowered (SABE) will also play a significant partnership role in this project.

Pipeline to Proposal Awards enable individuals and groups that are not typically involved in clinical research to develop the means to develop community-led funding proposals focused on patient-centered comparative effectiveness research (CER). Established by the non-profit PCORI, the program funds help individuals or groups build community partnerships, develop research capacity, and hone a comparative effectiveness research question that could become the basis of a research funding proposal to submit to PCORI or other health research funders.

This project will build a national partnership between young adults ages 18-30 with I/DD and their families, service providers, and researchers to identify mental health research priorities for young adults with I/DD. This partnership will seek consensus on mental health priorities and corresponding intervention needs for further exploration. Kramer and The Arc’s vision is to establish a sustainable partnership that is poised to engage in patient-driven mental health research that will improve support and facilitate the lifelong wellbeing of people with I/DD.

“The Pipeline to Proposal Awards program is a manifestation of PCORI’s commitment to the meaningful involvement of patients, caregivers, clinicians, and other stakeholders in all our research endeavors,” said Jean Slutsky, PA, MSPH, PCORI’s Chief Engagement and Dissemination Officer. “It provides support to those who may not otherwise have an opportunity to contribute to the field of comparative effectiveness research. We’re pleased to follow the awardees’ progress as they develop partnerships and begin to form research questions.”

PCORI is an independent, nonprofit organization authorized by Congress in 2010 to fund comparative effectiveness research that will provide patients, their caregivers, and clinicians with the evidence needed to make better-informed health and healthcare decisions. PCORI is committed to seeking input from a broad range of stakeholders to guide its work.

 

CONTACTS:

Boston University College of Health & Rehabilitation: Sargent College
Stephanie Rotondo, (617) 353-7476, rotondos@bu.edu

The Arc of the United States
Kristen McKiernan, (202) 534-3712, mckiernan@thearc.org

 

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Boston University LogoBoston University College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College is an institution of higher education which fosters critical and innovative thinking to best serve the health care needs of society through academics, research, and clinical practice. As reported by U.S. News and World Report, its graduate programs in Speech-Language Pathology and Physical Therapy rank in the top 6% of programs while Occupational Therapy is #1 in the nation. The College has more than 25 on-campus research facilities and clinical centers and offers degree programs in occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech, language and hearing sciences, health science, athletic training, human physiology, behavior and health, and nutrition. For more information, visit bu.edu/sargent.

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized institution of higher education and research.  With more than 33,000 students, it is the fourth-largest independent university in the United States.  BU consists of 17 schools and colleges, along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes integral to the University’s research and teaching mission. In 2012, BU joined the Association of American Universities (AAU), a consortium of 62 leading research universities in the United States and Canada.

 

The Arc advocates for and serves people with I/DD, including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

The Arc Responds to Bipartisan Health Care Legislation

Washington, DC – The Arc released the following statement in response to Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN) and Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) releasing bipartisan health care legislation:

“The Arc commends Senators Lamar Alexander and Patty Murray for their bipartisan work on health care. Together they have developed legislation that continues the cost-sharing reduction payments that help low income people access affordable health insurance for two years. Stopping these payments raises concerns about insurers significantly raising premiums or dropping out of the market place. A short-term extension will help stabilize the market place.

“The Arc encourages Congress to continue to work in a bipartisan manner on health care issues. People’s lives are at stake and we need a solution that supports all citizens including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and those with significant medical needs. We appreciate the leadership shown by Chairman Alexander and Ranking Member Murray of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee,” said Peter V. Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The agreement that Senators Alexander and Murray announced would also partially restore federal funding to the Department of Health and Human Services for consumer outreach and education and enrollment assistance. These services, which were cut earlier this year, help people enroll and understand the different plan options available. Restoring funding for these programs will be critical to ensuring the expansion of health care coverage and to reduce the number of uninsured people.

The bill also makes changes to the Section 1332 state waiver process. Section 1332 was included in the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to give states the option to experiment with other health coverage models as long as they maintain access to high quality, affordable health care, and maintain the consumer protections in the ACA. The proposal would keep the consumer protections in Section 1332 but streamlines the administration of the waiver.

The Arc advocates for and serves people wit­­h intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

No Rest for the Weary: Hurricane Harvey and Its Effects on People with Disabilities in Beaumont, Texas

by Hannah Colletti, The Arc of Greater Beaumont

People with Disabilities Affected by Hurricane Harvey

Some of the clients and providers staying at The Arc of Greater Beaumont pose for a picture in front of boxes of generous donations.

The flooding in Beaumont was unprecedented. Slowly, one by one, different sections of the city took on water. Some flooded during the days of seemingly ceaseless rain. Others flooded days after the storm, when the sun had finally come out, but when the bayous and rivers began to crest. Among the masses of those affected were people with disabilities. When one group home flooded, clients took shelter in another, until eventually a majority of homes had been damaged. Without a place to go, The Arc of Greater Beaumont offered refuge in their building. Chapter staff and their board scrambled to find air mattresses, pop up tables, and folding chairs to make people as comfortable as possible, as residents of five flooded group homes took refuge.

People saved what they could carry. John, a 21-year-old regular client of The Arc of Greater Beaumont with cerebral palsy, had a change of clothes, an extra pair of tennis shoes, a computer bag, a heat pack to help ease the recurring pain in his shoulder, and a single framed portrait of his family. He had lived in a group home in Bevil Oaks since December of last year, but unfortunately, it was almost completely underwater. Without a house to return to here in Beaumont, he feared he would be transferred to a home two hours away in Lufkin, which would put him farther from his family, his girlfriend, and his community.

The stress on clients and providers alike was palpable. Simple tasks like taking medicine became difficult due to the scarcity of water. No laundry facilities or showers were available, so providers were hand washing clothes and setting up sponge baths with what little water they could spare. Clients felt cramped. Though the space was accommodating, there was little more than a few feet between beds. Sleep was hard to come by for some, who were easily kept up by movement and noise.

Amidst the challenges, help came from our fellow chapters of The Arc from across the country, which sent supplies to help the Beaumont area. The Arc of Colorado, The Arc of Aurora, and The Arc Thrift Stores in Colorado crafted a plan to support The Arc of Greater Beaumont. Von Limbaugh, a member of The Arc of Colorado’s board of directors, reached out. Von and his son Andrew packed up a truck, loaded with 400 pounds of clothing from The Arc Thrift Stores, supplies from members of The Arc from across the state, water, food, baby supplies, medical supplies, cleaning supplies, and toiletries and they started to drive. Staff from chapters across the country were calling our executive director, offering anything to be helpful. We collected and organized donations and have been distributing them to those in need. The absence of a full kitchen made it hard to cook hot meals, yet still hot meals came from private individuals within the community. Board members for our chapter arrived with gallons of water and fresh produce. The organizations that ran the group homes did their best to fix and find spaces for their clients, and fortunately within a few days, everyone had a more stable solution to their housing needs.

Our community is still adjusting to the reality of life after this cataclysmic event. People with disabilities served by our chapter and the group homes are a part of this community figuring out how to recover. Their housing and day to day routine has changed greatly, and they’ve lost much of what has long been familiar to them. The Arc of Greater Beaumont has received numerous pleas to host events so these citizens can have a slight return to normalcy. Like any other non-profit or small business in our region, our bottom line has been impacted by this event. Thanks to the spirit of the greater Beaumont community, we have faith we will endure this hardship. And our hearts are full thanks to the generosity of our very special chapter network. We truly are a family.

President Trump Moves to Destabilize the Affordable Care Act (ACA)

The Arc is deeply disappointed by two recent initiatives of the Trump Administration regarding the Affordable Care Act (ACA). The first is the Administration’s decision to end cost sharing reduction (CSR) payments, a decision which will be devastating to the health insurance marketplace created by the ACA. CSRs were included in the ACA to help ensure that people earning less than 250% of the federal poverty level ($60,750 for a family of four in 2017) can afford out of pocket expenses such as deductibles and co-pays. The money is provided to the insurance companies to help them offer the required affordable coverage. CSRs are different from the premium tax credits also required by the ACA to help individuals and families afford the premiums. The tax credits are available to people earning up to 400% of the federal poverty level ($97,200 for a family of four in 2017).

Health insurers urged the Trump Administration to continue the payments to help keep premium costs down and to keep health insurers selling in the marketplace. The Congressional Budget Office estimated in August that ending the CSR payments would cost taxpayers $6 billion in 2018 and $21 billion in 2020. This is because the premium tax credits would go up when premiums are raised by insurers to offset the loss of the CSR. This move is consistent with the Trump Administration’s desire to undermine the ACA by driving more insurers out of the marketplace and discouraging people from signing up for coverage.

Last week the President also signed an executive order directing federal agencies to find ways to offer health insurance products that do not comply with the consumer protections in the ACA. These protections include ending pre-existing condition exclusions, ensuring that people with health conditions do not pay more, ensuring health plans cover adequate health care services, and other protections. These changes are particularly critical to people with chronic illness and disabilities who needs these protections to have access to affordable care that meets their needs. Promoting cheap and skimpy plans will hurt people who have more health care needs. It can also draw healthier people to the inadequate plans outside of the marketplace. These changes could make health insurance more expensive in the marketplace.

The executive order also directs agencies to figure out how to allow insurance plans to be sold across state lines. Currently health insurance plans are regulated on the state level. State insurance commissions are responsible for ensuring that the insurance sold in the state is sold by reputable and financially secure companies and meet the insurance requirements in the state. This type of change would bypass the state insurance commissions in addition to allowing plans that do not include the ACA protections.

The executive order does not immediately make these policy changes but directs the agencies to find ways to do so. These policy changes are in addition to the Trump Administration’s decisions to shorten open enrollment, slash advertising about open enrollment, shut down the healthcare.gov website for periods of time during open enrollment, and slash funding for health care navigators who help people with questions. Together these actions create additional barriers to enrollment.

The newest changes in the executive order and relating to the CSRs will depress enrollment, increase costs, and be particularly harmful to people with chronic illness and disabilities. The changes do nothing to improve access to affordable health care. Instead, it is expected that people with pre-existing conditions will be paying more for less in a destabilized health insurance marketplace.

The Arc Responds to President Trump’s Health Care Executive Order “Extremely dangerous for people with disabilities”

Washington, DC – The Arc released the following statement in response to President Trump’s Executive Order Promoting Healthcare Choice and Competition Across the United States

“President Trump, through the new Executive Order “Promoting Healthcare Choice and Competition Across the United States”, is urging his Administration to find ways to circumvent critical protections of the Affordable Care Act including pre-existing condition protections and requirements for adequate health benefits. If the agencies implement this order, it would undermine the health insurance marketplace and drive up the costs of premiums for people with chronic illnesses and disabilities. This is extremely dangerous for people with disabilities who have relied on the Affordable Care Act to receive quality and affordable health care. The Arc vehemently opposes health care policies, like this, that are detrimental to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.”  said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

Parents and Advocates Sue State of Georgia Over Separate and Unequal Education for Thousands of Students with Disabilities

Parents of Children with Disabilities, The Georgia Advocacy Office, The Center for Public Representation, The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, The Arc, DLA Piper LLP, and The Goodmark Firm File Class Action Lawsuit Against State of Georgia

ATLANTA, GA (Oct. 11, 2017) – Today, parents of children with disabilities, the Georgia Advocacy Office, the Center for Public Representation, the Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law, The Arc, DLA Piper LLP, and the Goodmark Law Firm filed a class action lawsuit in federal court alleging that the State of Georgia has discriminated against thousands of public school students with disabilities by providing them with a separate and unequal education via the State’s Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Supports Program (GNETS).

The complaint filed in United States District Court for the Northern District of Georgia, alleges that the State, in denying GNETS students the opportunity to be educated with their non-disabled peers in neighborhood schools violates the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. For more information about the litigation, please visit www.centerforpublicrep.org/court_case/gao-v-georgia/.

“The Georgia Advocacy Office (GAO), the independent Protection and Advocacy System for People with Disabilities in Georgia, is demanding the State abandon GNETS and stop segregating youth with disabilities,” said Ruby Moore, Executive Director of GAO. “GNETS programs are a relic of a time where people with disabilities were thought to be uneducable. GAO has and will continue to fight against GNETS and any program or service that unnecessarily segregates people with disabilities.”

GNETS are segregated programs that serve only students with disabilities, housed in entirely separate buildings or in separate wings of neighborhood schools, for students who need services for their disability-related behaviors. In 2016, over 5,000 students with disabilities were placed in GNETS. Most of these students are African-American and 100% of the students enrolled experience disabilities. “The State of Georgia’s segregated GNETS system flies in the face of long-standing Supreme Court precedent,” said Alison Barkoff, Director of Advocacy for the Center for Public Representation. “The Court recognized long ago that ‘separate educational facilities are inherently unequal.’ And the Supreme Court in Olmstead v. L.C. made clear that the ADA forbids the needless isolation or segregation of people with disabilities, because it deprives them of opportunities like getting an education and social contacts with peers.”

GNETS students are denied access to physical education, art, music, and extra-curricular activities, and many GNETS centers have no library, cafeteria, gym, science lab, music room, or playground. Some GNETS centers are located in buildings that were used to teach African-American students during the Jim Crow era, much of the instruction is performed via online programs rather than with certified teachers, and educational curricula are not aligned with State standards. Accordingly, GNETS students rarely earn a diploma. The GNETS graduation rate is only 10% in contrast to a nearly 80% graduation rate in neighborhood schools. Students in GNETS are physically restrained on a routine basis, nearly 10,000 times in 2014-2016. “Although advertised as ‘therapeutic,’ GNETS are anything but – often student behavior worsens once placed in GNETS because of the harsh and punitive atmosphere in the schools,” said attorney Craig Goodmark. “Decades of research and practice show that students with and without disabilities do best academically and socially when they learn alongside each other.”

Instead of providing local school districts with the resources to offer the services these students need, the State is spending millions of dollars on segregated settings. “GNETS was intended to be a placement of the last resort. Instead, GNETs has become a dumping ground for students whom local school districts do not want to educate,” said Ira Burnim, the Bazelon Center’s Legal Director. “Georgia is the only state in the country to systematically segregate students with disabilities on a statewide basis. This is a plain violation of federal disability laws intended to ensure that students with disabilities are able to learn and receive services in integrated settings along with their peers without disabilities.”

In response to the efforts of a broad coalition of stakeholders seeking to end the illegal segregation of students in GNETS, the Georgia Coalition for Equity in Education, and the U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) performed a multi-year investigation (www.ada.gov/olmstead/documents/gnets_lof.pdf) of GNETS. The investigation eventually culminated in a lawsuit against the State, alleging that the State’s administration of the GNETS system violates the ADA by “unnecessarily segregating students with disabilities from their peers” and providing “unequal” education opportunities to GNETS students. That lawsuit has been put on hold pending a decision from the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals regarding DOJ’s authority to bring suit.

“The Arc has long fought for students with intellectual and developmental disabilities to be educated in their neighborhood schools with appropriate services, supplementary aids, and supports,” said Stacey Ramirez, Director of The Arc’s Georgia state office. “Georgia’s systemic segregation of students with disabilities is unacceptable to The Arc and its constituents in Georgia. With DOJ’s lawsuit now on hold, the children of Georgia can wait no longer.”

About The Arc

The Arc is the largest national community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families. In partnership with its network of 650 chapters across the country, The Arc works to promote and protect the rights of people with I/DD to live, work, and learn in the community free from discrimination. Through its Georgia state office, The Arc seeks to ensure that students with I/DD throughout the state can meaningfully access the myriad benefits, programs, and services offered to students in neighborhood public schools. To learn more, visit www.thearc.org.

About The Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law

The Judge David L. Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law is a national legal advocacy organization protecting and advancing the rights of people with mental disabilities. The Center promotes laws and policies that enable people with mental disabilities to live independently in their own homes and

communities, and to enjoy the same opportunities that everyone else does. For more information, visit www.bazelon.org.

About The Center for Public Representation

The Center for Public Representation (CPR) is a national legal advocacy center for people with disabilities. For 40 years, CPR has been enforcing and expanding the rights of people with disabilities and others who are in segregated settings. CPR uses legal strategies, advocacy, and policy to design and implement systemic reform initiatives to that promote integration and full community participation. To learn more about our work, visit www.centerforpublicrep.org.

About DLA Piper LLP

DLA Piper is a global law firm with lawyers located in more than 40 countries throughout the Americas, Europe, the Middle East, Africa and Asia Pacific, positioning us to help clients with their legal needs around the world. To learn more, visit www.dlapiper.com/en/us.

About The Georgia Advocacy Office

The Georgia Advocacy Office is Georgia’s designated Protection and Advocacy System. GAO envisions a Georgia where all people have value, visibility and voice; where even the most difficult and long-lasting challenges are addressed by ordinary citizens acting voluntarily on behalf of each other; and where the perception of disability is replaced by the recognition of ability. GAO’s mission is to organize our resources and follow our values and legal mandates in ways which substantially increase the number of people who are voluntarily standing beside and for people in Georgia who have significant disabilities and mental illness. To learn more, visit www.thegao.org.

About The Goodmark Law Firm

Since 1999, Mr. Goodmark has dedicated a majority of his practice to representing families, teachers and students in their pursuit of equality, fairness and justice in Georgia’s schools. To learn more, visit www.goodmarklaw.com.