The Arc Marks Senate Passage of ABLE Act

Washington, DC – Today, as the U.S. Senate passed the Achieving a Better Life Act (ABLE Act), The Arc, the nation’s largest organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), released the following statement:

“We are pleased that the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act has been approved by both the U.S. House of Representatives and now the U.S. Senate.  With the clock winding down on this session of Congress, now this important legislation can move to President Obama’s desk.  We appreciate the untiring work of the chief sponsors of the bill and the support of a large and broad representation in both chambers of Congress.

“While the legislation was narrowed due to the constraints from the cost analysis, the approved bill will provide a vehicle for some families and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to save for the future, depending on their own circumstances.  Our efforts will not be finished if President Obama signs this bill – The Arc will continue to work with the leadership and chief sponsors in Congress to expand this program in the future to ensure that everyone in need can get the maximum benefit from this legislation.  We remain disappointed that certain pay-fors remain in the bill,” said Peter V. Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The ABLE Act aims to change the tax code to allow for tax advantaged savings accounts for individuals with disabilities for certain expenses, like education, housing, and transportation.  Similar to existing “Section 529” education savings accounts, ABLE accounts would let families save for disability-related expenses on behalf of qualified beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not replace, benefits provided through the Medicaid program, the Supplemental Security Income program, the beneficiary’s employment, and other sources.  If properly managed, funds in the ABLE accounts would not jeopardize eligibility for critical federal benefits.  With full understanding of its features, individuals and families could use the ABLE accounts as another tool in planning for the lifetime needs of an individual with long term disabilities.  The version of the bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives includes age limitations and a cap on contributions, added in July by the Committee on Ways and Means to reduce the costs of the bill.  If the President signs the ABLE Act into law, The Arc will issue a fact sheet including the details on the bill as it has been revised through the legislative process.  Further details would come through the regulatory process.

Federal Hiring of People with Disabilities Continues to Disappoint

Washington, DC – The federal government’s Office of Personnel Management (OPM) recently released Fiscal Year 2013 data on the hiring of people with disabilities in the government’s workforce. Once again, the report demonstrates that hiring of people with targeted disabilities, including intellectual disability (ID), continues to lag, and the federal government is missing an opportunity to be a model employer of people with disabilities.

“While the last few years have seen some modest increases in the numbers of people with disabilities employed by the federal government, The Arc remains deeply concerned that many people with the most significant disabilities, including jobseekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are being left behind. The federal government should implement the strategies the Department of Labor has laid out to meet their goal, and that should involve working with organizations like The Arc, with our nearly 700 chapters across the country, to proactively fill job openings with people with disabilities qualified for a variety of positions open in our government,” said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc.

The federal government, through the Department of Labor, has initiated a new effort to increase the number of people with disabilities employed by entities that contract with the government, asking contractors to aspire to a goal of 7 percent of their workforce with disabilities. In explaining why there is a need to step up hiring of people with disabilities, the Department of Labor has stated: “A substantial disparity in the employment rate of individuals with disabilities continues to persist despite years of technological advancements that have made it possible for people with disabilities to apply for and successfully perform a broad array of jobs.” Meanwhile, in Fiscal Year 2013, the federal government only hired 1,389 people with targeted disabilities, representing 1.32 percent of new hires overall. The category of targeted disabilities includes people with intellectual disability (ID).

One factor in the federal hiring picture is the congressionally mandated budget cuts known as sequestration. These cuts forced federal agencies to put in place furloughs, hiring freezes, and reduce overtime. These budget cuts have trickled down to impact hiring of all new employees, including people with disabilities. Several federal agencies, however, have used their Schedule A hiring authority to make hiring people with disabilities a priority. The Schedule A process is a non-competitive hiring method that provides people with disabilities a path to federal employment.

“The numbers demonstrate that successful employment for people with disabilities is doable with the Schedule A process. Agencies that haven’t used this tool in their toolbox should look to their peers for guidance on how to improve their outreach, in addition to utilizing the competitive process to reach people with disabilities that match the skill sets needed for job opportunities,” said Berns.

The agencies that have demonstrated willingness to hire via with Schedule A include the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Labor, the Office of Personnel Management, and the Treasury Department. However, 14 agencies hired no people using this hiring authority in 2013, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Federal Trade Commission, and Department of Housing and Urban Development, which each made over 100 new hires but none through Schedule A.

One federal agency that The Arc has recently partnered with to boost the number of people with intellectual disability employed is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). They have hired five individuals at GS3 and GS4 levels with the opportunity to be promoted to a GS5.

In July, The Arc submitted comments to the EEOC calling on the federal government to become a model employer of people with disabilities, including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

“While we are pleased that the EEOC is moving forward with strengthening federal regulations, the shockingly low rate of federal employment of people with intellectual disability persists. Agencies can act now to step up their efforts,” said Berns.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly reports that the percentage of working-age people with disabilities in the labor force is about one-third that of persons with no disability. On average, workers with disabilities face significant gaps in pay and compensation, compared to workers with no disability. Additionally, about one in three employment discrimination charges filed with the EEOC allege discrimination on the basis of disability (often, in combination with charges of other types of discrimination).

The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker. In 2010, The Arc conducted a national online survey, called the FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Over 5,000 people participated. Only 15 percent of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with an intellectual and/or developmental disability was employed.

The Arc Raises Questions in Case of Shocking Abuse and Neglect against Teenager in Anderson, Indiana

Indianapolis, IN – Fifteen years old and weighing less than 40 pounds.  Covered in feces and locked in a room, alone and for an unknown amount of time, by her grandfather.  The police reports released in Anderson, Indiana about the shocking abuse against a teenager with a disability raise significant questions about how this situation could go unnoticed in the community and unmonitored by a litany of state agencies which allowed this child to fall off the radar.

It has been reported the girl was removed from school to be home schooled – Indiana law does not require ongoing involvement from public schools when a family removes a child to be home schooled. Indiana’s Department of Children’s Services (DCS) had contact with the family at one time, but the case was closed.  The police have learned that the child lost access to Medicaid which helped cover nutritional supplements, but as there is no requirement for Medicaid case workers to follow up in such cases, this loss of coverage went unnoticed.

“This is a tragic situation that should never have happened.  The question now is, what can we as a community of advocates, state agencies, and individuals do to learn what went so terribly wrong for this young girl, and how can we all seek and act on ways to keep others safe and free from harm,” said John Dickerson, Executive Director of The Arc of Indiana.

“This is a shameful case of abuse and neglect that should force the system and society to think about how this young girl was hidden in plain sight, starving and without access to medical care, and to force action to prevent something like this from ever happening again.  People with disabilities are far too often victimized, without regard for their basic human rights.  And now this teenager is fighting for her life,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD) is operated by The Arc and is the first national effort of its kind to bring together both victim and suspect/offender issues involving people with I/DD under one roof.  NCCJD is a national clearinghouse for research, information, evaluation, training and technical assistance for criminal justice and disability professionals and other advocates that will build their capacity to better identify and meet the needs of people with I/DD, whose disability often goes unrecognized, and who are overrepresented in the nation’s criminal justice system.  Currently, NCCJD is developing training for law enforcement, victim service providers and legal professionals that will support police departments, prosecutor’s offices, and other professionals in the criminal justice system to effectively and fairly administer justice for people with disabilities.

NCCJD is a much needed resource for the Anderson, Indiana police force and local prosecutors as they pursue this case and will continue to be a resource for many other communities facing similar tragedies. Persons with disabilities are nearly three times more likely to be victimized – people with cognitive disabilities have the highest rate of victimization.  Children with intellectual disabilities are at twice the risk of physical and sexual abuse compared to children without disabilities.

The Arc Advocacy Network in Indiana can provide information, referral and advocacy to assist and guide individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families in understanding and applying for government programs, including Medicaid and home and community based services through the Medicaid Waiver program.  It can also serve as a resource to schools and local public and private agencies serving children and adults with disabilities.

Finally, The Arc has launched an online pledge to generate support to end acts of violence, abuse, and bullying of people I/DD.  The Arc and The Arc of Indiana encourage members of the public to sign this pledge to show their support.

Another Congressional Session Poised to End without Ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons of Persons with Disabilities

CRPDWashington, DC – As the clock winds down on the 114th Congress, U.S. Senate leaders have informed disability advocates that the Convention on the Rights of Persons of Persons with Disabilities will not be put to a vote because the treaty doesn’t have enough support in the chamber.

“It’s pitiful that once again, the U.S. Senate can’t come together and support a disability rights treaty that simply affirms our nation’s support for people across the globe who seek the same rights we enjoy here in the United States. Over 800 disability, civil rights, and faith groups support ratification of the treaty, representing countless people across the country. But this tidal wave of support has not swayed those in the Senate whose objections to this treaty have been proven false to support this cause. The Arc will continue our advocacy on this issue when Congress reconvenes in January,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc has been working with numerous other disability advocacy groups and U.S. Senators to garner support for the ratification of this treaty, which will promote, protect, and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities. The treaty is modeled after the Americans with Disabilities Act, which affirms the rights of American citizens with disabilities by prohibiting discrimination in employment, public services, public accommodations and services operated by private entities. For years, The Arc’s Public Policy team and grassroots advocates across the country have been working to promote the CRPD and ensure ratification.

The United States signed the CRPD on July 30, 2009, joining the 141 other signing nations. Today, the Convention has 151 ratifications and 159 signatures. On May 17, 2012, following almost three years of thorough review, the Obama Administration submitted its treaty package to the U.S. Senate for its advice and consent for ratification. Senator Bob Dole, who was a champion of the Americans with Disabilities Act, was present for the last attempt to vote on the treaty in December 2012 and urged his fellow Republicans to support it. Unfortunately, his plea along with strong Congressional and disability community support was not enough to overcome the unfounded fears raised by the opposition.

The Arc Marks House Passage of ABLE Act

Washington, DC – Today, as the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE Act), The Arc, the nation’s largest organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), released the following statement:

“We are pleased that the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act, H.R. 647, has been approved by the U.S. House of Representatives, and is one step closer to reaching President Obama’s desk.  We appreciate the untiring work of the chief sponsors of the bill and the support of a large and broad representation in Congress.  The ABLE Act is a good example of how members of both political parties can work together to craft legislation that benefits people with disabilities, as disability knows no political, geographic, gender, or ethnic boundaries.

“While the legislation was narrowed due to the constraints from the cost analysis, the approved bill will provide a vehicle for some families and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to save for the future.  The Arc will continue to work with the leadership and chief sponsors of this effort in Congress to expand this program in the future to ensure that everyone in need can get the maximum benefit from this legislation.  Our goal is to ensure that people with disabilities get the full use of the ABLE Act.   We still have concerns about certain pay-fors in the bill, and hope that the House and Senate can resolve these issues,” said Peter V. Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The ABLE Act aims to change the tax code to allow for tax advantaged savings accounts for individuals with disabilities for certain expenses, like education, housing, and transportation.  Similar to existing “Section 529” education savings accounts, ABLE accounts would let families save for disability-related expenses on behalf of qualified beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not replace, benefits provided through the Medicaid program, the Supplemental Security Income program, the beneficiary’s employment, and other sources.  If properly managed, funds in the ABLE accounts would not jeopardize eligibility for critical federal benefits.  With full understanding of its features, individuals and families could use the ABLE accounts as another tool in planning for the lifetime needs of an individual with long term disabilities.  The version of the bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives includes age limitations and a cap on contributions, added in July by the Committee on Ways and Means to reduce the costs of the bill.

The Arc National Headquarters Announces New Strategic Alliance with District of Columbia Chapter

Mary Lou Meccariello

Mary Lou Meccariello

Washington, DC – The Arc of the District of Columbia (The Arc of DC), a mainstay in our nation’s capitol for nearly 65 years, has entered into a new strategic alliance with The Arc of the United States for management of the chapter that aims to enhance services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in the District and create an incubator to develop best practices that can be replicated at chapters across the country in the future.

As longtime executive director Mary Lou Meccariello retires this fall, The Arc of DC’s board of directors is drawing on the expertise of The Arc’s national headquarters, also located in DC, to reposition the organization so that it can continue to be a preeminent service provider in the District and a powerful advocate for people with I/DD and their families. The chapter will continue to provide services in the DC Public Schools and employ people with I/DD performing contract services for the Federal government, while looking for new opportunities to expand its reach into the community.

2015 will mark 65 years of The Arc in the District of Columbia providing advocacy, supports and services for District residents. In order for the chapter to thrive going forward, and to support The Arc’s nearly 700 other chapters across the country, the national office staff will support The Arc of DC and develop innovative programs, services and supports at this chapter that can then be replicated throughout the network.

“With The Arc of DC in our backyard, this alliance presents a unique opportunity to find ways to serve and collaborate with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities for the next 65 years of our existence. Working with the chapter’s board of directors and with current and potential partners, we are looking forward to our new partnership to continue The Arc of DC’s reputation as a stellar community organization in the District,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

Meccariello, a native Washingtonian, is retiring with decades of professional experience in the field of disability, specializing in intellectual and developmental disabilities. She has played a key role in new program initiatives, service delivery, employer development and training, business development and legislative initiatives for people with I/DD in the city.

“I will miss The Arc and the people who embody our mission. I’m proud of the work we have done to support kids with I/DD in our schools and to employ people with disabilities in the community. We have served thousands and touched the lives of countless families. I look forward to watching the chapter thrive under this new strategic alliance with The Arc’s national office team,” said Meccariello.

“Mary Lou has been a tireless champion for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the District of Columbia, and she will be missed in her role within The Arc’s community, and in her capacity as a leader in the field in the District. I wish her the best in her retirement and thank her for her contributions to The Arc and the movement,” said Robert A. Andersen, Board President of The Arc of DC.

The Arc of DC can be reached at 202.636.2950 or on the web at http://www.arcdc.net.

The Arc Weighs In on Dr. Phil Shows on the Case of Kelly Stapleton

Dr. Phil logoWashington, DC – Last week, Dr. Phil aired two shows about the case of Kelly Stapleton, a mother from Michigan who attempted to take the life of her daughter, Issy, who has autism, and herself last year. The Arc released the following statement in response to the reporting done by the Dr. Phil Show.

“Kelly Stapleton’s failed attempt to take the life of her daughter, Issy, must be understood for exactly what it is – a crime of the worst magnitude – and her attempt to take her own life illustrates that likely she was experiencing a significant crisis in her own mental health. The act of a parent to kill or attempt to kill her own child is not a rational act, regardless of whether the child has a disability or how challenging the circumstances, and is never acceptable and offends our deepest values and sensibilities.

“There are, though, other lessons to be learned here. Unfortunately, the horrific story of the Stapletons shows what too many families across the country are facing – a failing system of supports and services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Stapletons were in a challenging situation and seeking help for their daughter so that she could continue to be with her family, attend school, and be a part of her community. If the system – in the end, the school district that rejected Issy’s inclusion for the school year – had not failed them, this family’s reality could have turned out very differently.

“Kelly’s actions are indefensible, and sensationalizing this family’s tragic story only hurts the public’s perception of autism. Issy’s voice, or the voice of a peer on the autism spectrum, should have been heard by the millions who tune in to Dr. Phil. His audience should have had the opportunity to learn from an individual with autism what it’s like to live with autism, and how services and supports can make a huge difference in their daily life. America needs to be woken up to this national crisis – the lack of access to services and supports for people with disabilities is an unacceptable reality and Issy and millions like her deserve much, much better,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc Calls on Cuyahoga County Prosecutor to Pursue Ice Bucket Challenge Assault Perpetrators to Fullest Extent of the Law

Washington, DC – As the nation has reacted with outrage to the incident in Bay Village, Ohio where a teenager with autism was doused with urine instead of ice water in a fake Ice Bucket Challenge, The Arc is calling on the Cuyahoga County prosecutor’s office to charge the five teenagers identified in the case to the fullest extent of the law.

“The perpetrators of this horrific act, who reportedly were neighborhood friends of the victim, need to be held accountable for their behavior.  While some seek to characterize what was done to this teen as an innocent prank, it is anything but.  Call it what it is – it was an assault and abuse.  These kinds of acts are an outright attack on the humanity of people with autism and other intellectual or developmental disabilities in Ohio and nationwide.  There is no possible excuse for this type of assault and the perpetrators should be prosecuted,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

“Unfortunately, people with disabilities experience violence and abuse at high rates, often at the hands of abusers who are known to them.  Many have a strong need to feel accepted and fit in which can, at times, lead them into places and situations with people who they think are their friends, but who are anything but.  When abuse or other violent acts are committed, whether by friends or complete strangers, our legal system must respond.  In this case, the Cuyahoga County prosecutor’s office must send a message that will stop future perpetrators in their tracks – it is not okay to attack a person with a disability,” Berns added.

The Arc has a long history of standing up for the rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), and supporting them to do the same, when they find themselves in dangerous situations and in our legal system.  Most recently, last year, The Arc was awarded a two-year grant for $400,000 by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) to develop the National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD).  This is the first national effort of its kind to bring together both victim and suspect/offender issues involving people with I/DD under one roof.  NCCJD is a national clearinghouse for research, information, evaluation, training and technical assistance for justice and disability professionals and other advocates that will build their capacity to better identify and meet the needs of people with I/DD, whose disability often goes unrecognized, and who are overrepresented in the nation’s criminal justice system.  Currently, NCCJD is developing training and technical assistance for law enforcement agencies that will support police departments like Bay Village’s force, as well as prosecutor’s offices,  such as the office in Cuyahoga County, to administer justice for people with disabilities.  And The Arc supports people with I/DD to be prepared for situations like these, connect them with other survivors of abuse and bullying, and find a collective voice to stand up against it.

The Arc also runs the Autism NOW Center, an online resource center that helps people weed through the volumes of information found online about autism spectrum disorders and provide high-quality, vetted resources and information to people with autism and other developmental disabilities, their family, friends, colleagues, teachers, employers and others.

“Never should a human have to endure such needless acts of abuse. It is never justified and it is never the victim’s fault for they may not even know why they were treated the way they were, but there are people who do. The ones who do know why this kind of abuse is so wrong are the ones who stand together, like The Arc and our chapters, which stand united to push for these random acts of abuse to be punished by law.   Random acts of kindness make a better person. Be good to those in need and one day the favor will be returned twofold,” Amy Goodman, Co-Director of the Autism NOW Center.

“We cannot stand by and accept this horrific act- the prosecutors know what they must do and they must do it swiftly to send the message that attacks on people with disabilities will not be tolerated and will be punished,” Cindy Norwood, Executive Director, The Arc of Greater Cleveland.

The Arc Calls on the Federal Government to Hire More People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Washington, DC – Yesterday, The Arc submitted comments to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) calling on the federal government to become a model employer of people with disabilities, including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

“While the last few years have seen some modest increases in the numbers of people with disabilities employed by the federal government, The Arc remains deeply concerned that many people with the most significant disabilities, including jobseekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are being left behind,” said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc.

Data obtained by The Arc from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) reveal that in fiscal year 2012, the federal government employed only 813 non-seasonal, full time permanent employees with intellectual disability (ID), representing 0.044% of all federal employees.   Only 28 people, or 3/100ths of one-percent of total new hires, were people with ID.  That same year, the federal government employed only 118 part-time employees with ID.  Only 17 people with ID were hired as part-time employees, about 9/100ths of one-percent of new hires.

“While we are pleased that the EEOC is moving forward with strengthening federal regulations, the shockingly low rate of federal employment of people with intellectual disability is unacceptable. The Arc calls on the federal government to act immediately to remove barriers to employment for people with disabilities in the federal workforce, establish strong goals for hiring of people with disabilities, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and hold agencies accountable for meeting those goals.

“There is no need for OPM to wait for the EEOC to complete the rulemaking process before it takes action to address this problem.  OPM already has authority under existing law and under Executive Order 13548 to take action now,” Berns said.

Issued by President Obama on July 26, 2010, E.O. 13548, titled “Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities,” calls on the Federal Government to hire 100,000 people with disabilities over five years.

“As a first step, OPM should direct federal agencies to update and revise the “agency-specific plans for promoting employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities” required under the Executive Order so that they specifically address employment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. There are other steps that can be taken today.   The Federal Communications Commission has already embarked on an initiative to hire people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in that agency.  Other agencies should get started too.

“Across the United States, The Arc has nearly 700 state and local chapters in 49 states and DC that stand ready to assist the federal government in identifying people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are ready to work and whose abilities will be an asset to federal agencies. The federal government can and should be a model employer of people with disabilities. The Arc will continue to closely monitor annual reports on the federal employment of people with disabilities to ensure progress and accountability,” said Berns.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly reports that the percentage of working-age people with disabilities in the labor force is about one-third that of persons with no disability. On average, workers with disabilities face significant gaps in pay and compensation, compared to workers with no disability. Additionally, about one in three employment discrimination charges filed with the EEOC allege discrimination on the basis of disability (often, in combination with charges of other types of discrimination).

The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker. In 2010, The Arc conducted a national online survey, called the FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Over 5,000 people participated. Only 15% of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with an intellectual and/or developmental disability was employed.

PBATS and The Arc Join Forces to Promote Inclusion

Peter Berns with Gene Gieselmann, David Phelps, Neil Romano

Gene Gieselmann, Founding Member, PBATS/Head Athletic Trainer, St. Louis Cardinals (1969 – 1997); Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer, The Arc; David Phelps, Pitcher, New York Yankees; Neil Romano, Former Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy
Photo credit: New York Yankees. All rights reserved.

BRONX, NY (May 30, 2014) – The Professional Baseball Athletic Trainers Society (PBATS) and The Arc announced today at Yankee Stadium a partnership to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in sporting activities nationwide.

In 2014, The Arc – a nonprofit organization that aims to promote and protect the human rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities – will contribute through the involvement of their local chapters and children with disabilities at PBATS’ PLAY (Promoting a Lifetime of Activity for Youth) Campaign events nationwide.

“We are thrilled about this partnership with The Arc,” PBATS President Mark O’Neal said. “This is a great platform to spread the message of inclusion and to afford children with disabilities the opportunity to participate in the PLAY Campaign and spend a day at their favorite Major League ballpark.”

Representing PBATS at Yankee Stadium Friday were founding members Gene Monahan (New York Yankees Head Athletic Trainer, 1973-2011) and Gene Gieselmann (St. Louis Cardinals Head Athletic Trainer, 1969-1997); Senior Advisor Neil Romano (former Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy); and Head Athletic Trainers Steve Donohue (Yankees) and Dave Pruemer (Minnesota Twins).

Said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc: “We are excited to be a part of the PLAY Campaign this year because we know these events will be a lot of fun for kids associated with our chapters, will teach them about the importance of health and wellness in their lives, and will raise awareness of The Arc and the population we serve in the baseball world.”

The PLAY Campaign – conducted at all 30 Major League Baseball stadiums each season – is a public awareness campaign of PBATS. The campaign is designed to help combat childhood obesity and promote a healthy and active lifestyle by promoting fun activities and good decision making. Originally developed in 2004, PLAY is now the longest running health campaign in professional sports directed specifically at young people.

The PLAY Campaign events are typically two hours in length and include stations hosted by experts from across the United States. This year, for the first time, children with intellectual and developmental disabilities from chapters of The Arc will participate alongside children without disabilities at these events.

The campaign event stations include the Henry Schein Cares Foundation’s presentation on oral hygiene, the Taylor Hooton Foundation’s presentation on appearance and performance enhancing drug education, baseball specific activity stations with Major League Baseball athletic trainers, an educational session with regard to nutrition tips and a question and answer session with a Major League player from the hosting team.

PBATS members will host the PLAY Campaign events in all 30 Major League Stadiums in 2014 where they will educate over 2,000 young people and their parents.