Issues That Affect Oral Health for Individuals with IDD

Toothpaste and toothbrush

Image via Kenneth Lu, used under a Creative Commons license

Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) often suffer from many health-related conditions.  According to several studies and through The Arc’s HealthMeet project we have learned that poor oral health has been a significant problem for individuals with IDD.  One-third of individuals with IDD have untreated cavities and eighty-percent have untreated gum disease.  Tooth or gum pain can cause individuals to stop eating, affect speech/communication, and affect overall behavior and mood.

There is a multitude of reasons as to why oral health is an issue.  Accessibility to/from appointments, around the dentist office, and with equipment can all be large obstacles.  Financial reasons are also another large factor as some dentists won’t accept Medicaid or dental visits aren’t covered under their current insurance plan.  The lack of training and education for dentists regarding how to communicate and work with individuals with IDD can also impact the quality of services they are entitled to receive.

Due to some of these constrictions, individuals with IDD are less likely to visit the dentist for routine care.  Fear of the dentist can make getting routine cleanings and check ups a traumatizing experience.  These preventative visits, which can help to find cavities and signs of gum disease early on, are then skipped letting small issues grow into larger problems.   Organizations such as Practice without Pressure and the Blende Dental Group are striving to help improve oral health in individuals with IDD in their local areas by providing practice sessions to reduce fear and anxiety, and offering home visits.

Individuals with IDD tend to have poor eating habits when compared to the general population, which can mean eating more sugary foods, sodas, fast food – all things that have higher levels of bacteria that cling to teeth, causing plaque to build up and eat away at the enamel on your teeth causing cavities. Problems such as sensory issues, the taste/feel of the toothpaste or toothbrush, and inability to grasp the toothbrush can all make daily brushing a challenge.  Other times it’s as simple as just not remembering to brush twice a day letting plaque sit and eat away at teeth overnight while sleeping.

Saliva is a natural agent that helps neutralize the acidity/plaque levels in our mouth.  However, some medications (examples can be high blood pressure meds, antihistamines, antidepressants, etc.) can have a side effect of lowering the levels of saliva in the mouth (often called dry mouth).  These lower levels mean that less plaque is washed away and it has a longer time to linger on teeth causing decay.  Certain liquid medications can also be high in sugars as well.

While some of these obstacles are more difficult to change and will take time, there are many things that influence your oral health status that can be more easily altered in your daily routine.  Below are some tips that can help make daily oral care and prevention easier for individuals with IDD:

  • Poking a hole in a tennis ball and inserting the handle of a toothbrush or molding putty around the handle will make it much easier to grip and use.
  • Simple diet changes, like cutting out sodas and sweets, in addition to also assisting with weight loss and energy levels, will also help lower plaque levels in your mouth that can cause cavities.
  • Reduce snacking between meals – every time we eat our mouth turn into an acidic environment. In between eating is when our mouth has a chance to neutralize and return to normal levels. More snacking means the mouth stays at a higher acidic level for longer periods.
  • Set alarms on phones or leave notes in the bathroom as reminders to brush teeth in the morning and before going to bed.  Apps for your phone can be downloaded to set reminders.
  • If possible, try to take medications at meal times or at least before you brush your teeth at night so that plaque does not sit overnight on your teeth.

Being aware of some of these factors that can influence your oral health will help individuals be more conscious in the future and realize the importance of trying to get to the dentist yearly for routine care. Check out Healthmeet’s webpage for more informationresources and webinars on oral health care for individuals with IDD.

Fall Is Racing Season!

If you’re a runner or have any runner friends you might have heard them talk about fall being race season. To many runners, the crisp autumn weather is considered the “perfect” running weather and a lot of people head out to local parks, community centers, etc. to take part in the fun of running a race – whether it’s a 5k (3.1 miles) or a marathon.

CDC’s Vital Signs earlier this year sent out shocking statistics that half of all adults with disabilities get no aerobic exercise at all and are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke and diabetes. For those that are able, running/walking is a great way to get in daily exercise without having to have a special place to go or expensive equipment to use. The only real equipment that is needed is proper shoes and comfortable workout clothing.

While running may be hard for some to start off with walking can actually provide many of the same health benefits as running without all the impact that running endures on the body. Running and walking are both great cardiovascular activities that help to build muscle and endurance, make your heart stronger, and help relieve high blood pressure. They also burn calories which aid in weight loss and reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes.

While running/walking is a very individualized sport that you don’t need anyone else to do it with, it can actually be a very social activity as well. A walking club is a great way to stay active and socialize with friends at the same time. All over the country are runs and walks of various distances that anyone can take part in, regardless of if they have an intellectual disability or not. Now-a-days more and more races are taking the initiative to specifically reach out to individuals with intellectual disabilities to be a part of the action. Girls on the Run (GOTR) is a 12 week running program for girls ranging from 3rd to 8th grade with the goal of finishing a sponsored 5k race at the end of the program. GOTR in Columbia has reached out to The Arc of Midlands to work with them to recruit individuals to join in one of their upcoming races. The Spartan Race is an off-road race combined with different obstacles throughout the course and has grown significantly more popular in past years. The Spartan Race has recently modified their course in certain locations to develop a Special Needs Obstacle Course so that individuals with intellectual disabilities can participate as well.

Completing a race is more than just doing the miles. In addition to the many physical benefits from running or walking there is also a great sense of accomplishment and pride that comes from crossing the finish line filled with the support of spectators cheering you on. It helps to boost overall self-esteem and mood, which is what draws many people back to do another race. Many races give out shirts and some even give medals to everyone who finishes, which is a great bonus to all the hard work and training that has been accomplished.

A popular fun race to do every year is a Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving Day morning. It’s a great way to get the entire family and friends out to be active and do an activity that includes individuals of all ages and fitness levels. It’s also a great way to burn some calories before that big turkey dinner later in the day! So this fall think about joining a running/walking group in your community or start one with friends and family to help increase your fitness level. To find local races in your area, check out the race calendar. Learn more ways to stay healthy and active by checking out The Arc’s HealthMeet page.

Reproductive Health Education and Disability

Holding Hands

Image via Summer Skyes, used under a Creative Commons license

Reproductive and sexual health is a natural part of everyone’s life, but seems to be a very taboo topic for individuals with IDD. Reproductive and sexual education is taught in most public schools all across the United States, but not many programs are out there that explain it so that individuals with IDD can fully understand. If we truly want these individuals to live healthy fulfilling lives, educating them about sexual health should be included. Part of living a fulfilling life is to find healthy relationships that help you throughout life’s ups and downs and increase your emotional happiness, so why should that be any different for individuals with IDD.

While this topic can be uncomfortable and scary to discuss with those you care for, it is necessary. There are stereotypes out there regarding this topic such as – individuals with IDD are asexual or, just the opposite, that they have an over-sexual drive that they can’t control. These stereotypes are just not true. They go through the same feelings and emotions that any other individual may have, but with the subject commonly being overlooked they may not understand what is happening in their bodies or how to properly deal with those feelings in ways that are socially acceptable. Teaching behaviors like when and where certain behaviors are acceptable, proper communication, mutual consent between individuals, and how to be smart/safe about protecting yourself in different situations is essential. A lot of this type of education is about teaching appropriate behaviors while the rest is presenting the actual facts.

Many individuals with disabilities have girlfriends/boyfriends, so it is important for them to know the options about if they are going to act on their feelings how to be safe to prevent the transmission of STD’s and unplanned pregnancy (unless in confliction with religious, cultural beliefs, etc.). Since many of these individuals may have pre-existing medications they take, consulting their physician is the best way to figure out what method of prevention is appropriate and safe for each individual. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently stated that birth control and reproductive health should be integrated to become a part of regular care for individuals with IDD.

Another very key reason why this topic should be addressed is because individuals with IDD are at a much higher risk of being sexually assaulted. Statistics say that an alarming 80% of females and 30% of males with IDD are sexually abused during their lifetime. Learning about the difference between good and bad relationships and appropriate boundaries is essential. This type of education will help teach individuals that it is OK to speak up and say no in a situation they are not comfortable in and hopefully will help to prevent these types of incidents from occurring to individuals with IDD in the future.

While it’s a difficult subject for a lot of people, it’s important that we learn to properly teach individuals with IDD about reproductive and sexual health. The Arc’s HealthMeet project has a resource section that contains information about puberty, sexuality and more. Teaching individuals to understand their bodies and feelings will lead to healthier relationships in the future.

Yoga Benefits Everyone

Yoga pose

Yoga image via Tomas Sobek, used under a Creative Commons license

Exercising is a vital part of staying healthy. With so many different fitness fads and activities out there it’s hard to tell which ones actually produce real benefits and which ones aren’t worth your time. While yoga has been around for quite a while now its popularity has grown significantly in past years.  The general population seems to have decided that its results are worthwhile, but what kind of benefits does it have for individuals with disabilities?

Yoga is a combination of body and mind.  It focuses on not only working your physical state, but your mental state as well by incorporating calming breathing and focusing techniques that most don’t even realize they are reaping the benefits from at the time. One of the best parts of yoga is that it is so easily adaptable to all different fitness levels, so individuals of all capabilities are able to participate at the same time (including individuals that use a wheelchair).

Holding the different poses, such as downward dog, cat, tree, etc., engage many different muscles at the same time to strengthen and stretch muscles all over giving you a total body workout. These strengthening activities, which help build muscle control and stability, are great for individuals with disabilities that can make them more prone to muscle weakness. The gradual building of muscle and flexibility overtime using your own body weight aids in reducing the risk of injuries associated with other activities involving heavy weights or machines. These moves and poses rotate joints through their full range of motion helping individuals with disabilities learn to concentrate on specific body parts to improve fine and gross motor skills. It also gets blood flowing throughout the entire body to improve circulation as well. This increased knowledge of balance and control will help with mobility, reducing falls, and hand/eye coordination.   Being more aware and in tune with their bodies can help individuals feel more comfortable and confident in their own their own skin.

In addition, there are also many psychological improvements from yoga too. While yoga is an activity that is done individually going to yoga classes lets individuals be a part of a group of their peers without having the stress from other team sports where their individual performance is going to affect the teams’ outcome. Learning and mastering the different poses leads to a feeling of accomplishment and pride, thus increasing self-esteem levels. Yoga has also been shown to increase focus, concentration and decrease feelings of anxiety. The calming effects that yoga introduces on the body can even be used outside of the yoga classroom in everyday life to reduce negative behaviors. For example, the breathing techniques can be brought into play when individuals start getting angry, aggressive, or stressed to bring them back to a relaxed state.

Another great thing about yoga is that it doesn’t have to be done in a class. Yoga requires very little equipment and can be done almost anywhere – inside or outside, in the grass or beach, or in a yoga studio or your house. Videos that are adapted for individuals with disabilities can be found on NCHPAD’s website and WhatDisability.com. Other resources and books can also be found online too for extra help and information. Yoga terms can be difficult to pronounce, so change the names of the different yoga poses around to make them easier to remember and support with sounds, phrases, etc. While yoga might not be the exercise of choice for everyone, there are many aspects of yoga that can have positive effects, both physically and mentally, for many individuals with disabilities.

Immunization Month – Not Just for Kids

August has been recognized by the CDC as National Immunization Month. During this month they are striving to inform individuals about the importance of immunizations, not only for children, but throughout an individual’s lifespan as well. The week of August 24 – 30, designated Not Just For Kids, specifically tries to reach out to adults about maintaining their health with proper immunizations. Immunizations are especially recommended for those adults with chronic conditions (for example asthma), diabetes or heart disease, which studies have proven to all be more prevalent in individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD). Many individuals with IDD may live in a residential housing program with other peers or attend a day program – this increases their daily exposure to other individual’s germs and bacteria making it even more important that they keep up to date with necessary immunizations.

For an individual with IDD that already has many other chronic conditions present contracting the flu, pneumonia, whooping cough, etc. can be very hard to fight off as well as being a large financial strain if hospitalization, follow up medications, etc. is required.

One vaccine that is most commonly discussed for adults is the Influenza, or flu, vaccine. It’s recommended to get a flu vaccine every year to build immunity against the illness. The other highly recommended vaccination is the Td (tetanus) shot, which is recommended every ten years for adults (starting after the age of about 19 years old). To avoid getting the tetanus bacteria it is also recommended to make sure to thoroughly clean all wounds and cuts to get all dirt and bacteria out. This will also help to reduce the chances of getting any other bacterial infections as well.

Other vaccines can help prevent against certain cancers, Hepatitis A & B, measles, mumps, and pertussis (also called whooping cough). In past years there has been an increase in the outbreaks of whooping cough in the US. In just the state of Wisconsin they reported over 7,000 cases of whooping cough from 2011 to 2013 and 48,000 cases nationwide in 2012. It is unsure what has recently caused this increase, but making sure that everyone is up-to-date on all recommended vaccinations will help to reduce future outbreaks.

Vaccinations are not the same for everyone. They can depend on an individual’s age, occupation, genetics, potential exposure to harmful diseases and germs, and other pre-existing health conditions the individual may have. So next time you’re at the doctor make sure to talk to him/her about which vaccinations are recommended for the ones you care for and make sure to keep them up to date in the future.

Eruption Athletics – An Innovative Approach to Making Fitness Fun

Eruption AthleticsThe Arc recently paired up with the dynamic duo of Chris Engler and Joe Jelinski, the co-owners of Eruption Athletics, to present at the National Down Syndrome Congress Conference. Together, The Arc and EA, presented 3 health and fitness sessions – 1 to the general conference and 2 interactive fitness sessions with their Youth and Adult conference for self-advocates.

Eruption Athletics (EA) was created in 2009 to help prepare individuals competing in Special Olympics’ games. Since then the organization has evolved into an adapted fitness facility designed specifically for individuals with disabilities to come to work out and learn more about health and fitness. Located just outside Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, EA first partnered with The Arc’s Achieva Chapter to help do fitness sessions at their free health assessment events as part of the HealthMeet project.

Joe and Chris help empower their clients with the knowledge of how to be physically active to build strength and endurance while preventing injuries. They provide personal one-on-one or group training sessions. Their program instills in their clients an attitude that there is nothing they can’t do because of their disability and shows them that exercises just need to be modified or adjusted to fit each individual’s specific needs. Spend two minutes in a room with Joe and Chris and you’ll know why they have a dedicated following of clients that continue to come back. Their bright colored clothing matches their high energy vibe and excitement that they bring to each training session.

Individuals that come to their classes are not only becoming more physically active they are also developing socially and cognitively. The group sessions with peers masks working out by providing a fun, social, and supportive environment that makes individuals actually look forward to exercising! It gives them a place to go each week to see old friends, meet new ones, and be part of a group that encourages each person to fulfill their own potential without comparison to others in the program. Their innovative approach to physical activity is helping to improve their clients physically and mentally by not only building muscle, but also self-confidence through proven results.

EA has recently released their new patented Eruption Athletics “Volcano PADD”. The PADD along with the accompanying instruction manuals that vary from beginner to advanced makes exercising easier, fun, and more accessible for individuals with disabilities. To learn more about EA’s Volcano PADD, contact Eruption Athletics.

This isn’t the last you’ll be seeing of Eruption Athletics though. They will be joining us in October down in New Orleans for The Arc’s National Convention. Joe and Chris will be combining forces with the HealthMeet project again to provide morning fitness sessions – so make sure to find out what all the hype is about and join us in New Orleans for our energizing sessions to get your day started right (and make some new friends in the process!).

Easy Approaches to Safety and Injury Prevention

Safety firstFalls are a large cause of traumatic brain injuries and physical disabilities in the US and can happen to anyone at any age. We should strive to make sure that the environments we are working and residing in are safe for ourselves, as well as the ones we care for, and that we are taking the necessary precautions to prevent abuse of prescribed medicines, alcohol and daily mishaps.

One of the biggest safety issues is preventing falls. While some falls are inevitable and can’t be controlled we can do our best to ensure the area around us is as safe as possible to prevent the ones that we can. Some individuals with disabilities are already at a higher risk of falling due to mobility issues that can make getting around already a daily struggle for them. Small changes in your home, such as adding a railing on stairways or a handle bar in the bathroom/shower, can make a big difference. Most often these small things are simple to overlook daily, but very easy to correct. Another easy change is to make sure that there is plenty of area between furniture and tables so that individuals with walking aids will have plenty of room to pass by without hitting items around them. Remove area rugs or make sure that they are secured tightly to the floor with double sided tape or non-slip grips underneath.

Each room in your house should have proper lighting and light switches and lamps should be easy to get to when entering a room. Making sure the individual you care for receives regular check-ups to maintain their vision is also helpful, so that they can clearly see the environment around them. Blurry vision can cause dizziness or make them lightheaded which could contribute to losing their balance and tripping. Staying physically active will also help build bone density and muscle to make individuals stronger and increase coordination and balance, so that they are able to support themselves more and reduce injuries.

It is important to prevent the abuse of prescription drugs. Individuals with an intellectual disability may not intentionally misuse their drugs, but unknowingly forget to take their medicine, take too much of it, or not be aware and combine it with something else that could be potentially harmful. This is why it is necessary for individuals to learn and be aware of what medicines they are taking, potential side effects, and things to stay away from when on certain medications (such as alcohol, other prescription drugs, etc.). A pill container that has the days of the week on it is a great idea to use to distribute what pills are taken at what time of the day. They also serve as a good indicator of whether the medicine has been taken that day in case the individual forgets. This will reduce the risks associated with taking too much/too little of the prescribed medicine. Providing individuals with disabilities with this knowledge will help them understand the importance of each medication and the amounts that they take.

Future injuries and accidents can be prevented by ensuring that the environment around you is safe and the ones you care for are empowered with the knowledge of potentially harmful situations. In the case that something does happen make sure there are emergency numbers near all phones for 911, poison control and the fire department. Watch The Arc’s HealthMeet webinar to learn more about how to prevent and improve emergency care for when accidents do happen.

Health Matters – Low Physical Activity Levels For Individuals with Disabilities

HealthMeet, two people trainingCDC released their Vital Signs earlier this month that focused on physical activity and disability which revealed some alarming facts about the amount of activity that individuals with disabilities receive. The data showed that half of individuals with disabilities get no physical activity at all (compared to 1 in 4 for individuals without a disability). No physical activity leads to other health-related issues such as obesity, heart disease, stroke and diabetes – which individuals with disabilities are three times more likely to have. Changes need to be made to relay the importance of being physically active and alterations to existing programs need to occur so that individuals with disabilities have more options to physical activities that they enjoy.

The CDC states that there are more than 21 million Americans in the US that identify as having a disability. While the range of ability for these individuals varies significantly, a lot of these individuals are capable of being physically active on some level. It is recommended that individuals exercise two and a half hours a week, which breaks down to about 30 minutes of activity 5 days a week. However, any activity is better than none, so even if it’s just a 1o minute walk it still counts for something. If the individual hasn’t done any physical activity at all prior to this, 10 minutes may also be as long as they can go. Starting slowly and building up gradually over time is essential to help prevent injuries or discouraging individuals with an activity that is too difficult in the beginning.

The Arc’s HealthMeet project has taken steps to help improve the current situation by training caregivers and other direct service professionals in the HealthMatters program. HealthMatters is an evidence-based health and fitness curriculum developed by the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC) that is tailored specifically for individuals with disabilities. It provides the structure and materials to implement a 12 week health and fitness program. Each session focuses on a healthy lesson for the day, such as making sure to drink water while exercising or the importance of stretching before/after exercising, etc., and then spends the other half of the time doing a fitness activity. Activities can be done inside or outside and require little equipment so it’s easy to implement and get started without the need for expensive machines and equipment.

Through HealthMeet, The Arc has certified 76 new trainers from 38 different Chapters of The Arc and other disability organizations across the US. HealthMatters has been implemented in a variety of different ways that suit each communities needs best, whether it’s in a day/residential program, combined with the HealthMeet project’s free health assessments, or brought into local schools special education programs. A few of The Arc’s Chapters have paired the lessons with field trips to local grocery stores to learn about eating healthy or to The Y to learn about using the different weight lifting machines and partake in water aerobics in their pool. These field trips not only were fun and educational for the participants it also got them out in their community and allowed employees that worked at the local establishments a chance to interact and learn more about our population, which they might have had little experience with beforehand.

In addition to getting these individuals up and moving on a weekly basis and helping them to learn more about making healthier choices, the HealthMatters program also improves social skills and helps build self-esteem. It gives participants a chance to interact and be part of a group. It also helps them find individuals that might have similar interests that they can be active with.

For more information about how to participate in one of The Arc’s sponsored HealthMatters: Train the Trainer sessions, contact Kerry Mauger at Mauger@thearc.org

HealthMeet: Top 5 exercises for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Guest post by Jared Ciner, Certified Personal Trainer, Disabilities Support Counselor
Founder/Director of SPIRIT Fit & Health

As you may already know, an extremely high percentage of people in America are suffering from obesity. What you may not know is that people with developmental and other disabilities are 58% more likely to be obese than the general population, and they make up roughly 20% of our country’s citizens. As a society, it is our duty to provide the necessary resources and support that enable people with disabilities to be healthy. The purpose of this article is to begin enabling people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to take control of their lives through the practice of health-promoting exercises that are safe, effective and tailored specifically towards their needs.

As a certified personal trainer, I believe that partaking in proper exercise and physical activities empowers us as human beings, and allows us to reach our mental, emotional and physical potential. As a support counselor, I know that people with I/DD often require adapted strategies in order to accomplish certain functional goals. In April of 2013, I teamed up with Sam Smith, certified personal trainer and proud young man with Asperger’s syndrome, to design and implement group health & fitness programs for teens and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Below are five exercises that we encourage all people, including those with an I/DD, to practice in order to maximize their strength, health and independence. Each exercise focuses in improving stability, strength and cardiovascular endurance. (The information below is presented as images. Access a readable file here.)

#1: Plank:

Plank

#2: High Knees:

HealthMeet - High Knees

#3: Arm Circles:

HealthMeet - Arm Circles

#4: Single-Leg Balance:

HealthMeet - Single Leg Balance

#5: Squats:

HealthMeet - Squats

Healthy Eating Tips to Help Fight Obesity

Obesity is one of the largest problems facing adults living in the United States. Statistics show that one-third of Americans is considered obese.  Thirty-six percent of individuals with disabilities are considered obese as compared to 23% of individuals without disabilities. The best way to fight obesity is by eating healthy and staying active. Unfortunately, for individuals with disabilities there can be physical limitations as to what they can do in regards to physical activity.  While most activities can be modified to fit the person’s individual fitness needs, this still puts a greater importance on the necessity to eat healthier. Poor nutrition, which can lead to obesity, can also be a catalyst for many other health related issues too like high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and fatigue.

There are many reasons as to why individuals with disabilities may not eat as healthy as they should – lack of nutritional awareness, limited income, trouble cooking themselves, difficulty chewing or swallowing specific foods, or sensitivity to certain tastes or foods. If a caregiver cooks meals for them, the individual may have limited input as to what types of foods are prepared. Ensuring that the individual has a say in their meal choices and making a few key changes can help tremendously when it comes to healthy eating. A simple change such as drinking more water instead of sugary beverages throughout the day will help keep you hydrated, feeling fuller with no calories, and generally doesn’t cost a thing.

Teaching individuals with disabilities how to save money while at the grocery store will help them pocket some extra cash for other activities or allow them to buy more food.  Simple tips such as, using coupons, buying store brand or generic brand versus name brand items, looking for daily specials, and paying attention to expiration dates will help stretch those food dollars.  Fresh fruits that are in season usually won’t go bad as quickly and are more cost efficient. Instead of buying yellow bananas that are already ripe (and can go bad quickly) try buying them when they are a little green so that they will last longer. Once bananas ripen, freeze them to make banana bread!  Individuals with disabilities who also have mobility issues might have trouble cutting up foods such as, vegetables and fruits. Specially adapted utensils can make this process easier and safer. You can also try purchasing frozen or canned fruits and veggies instead (choose fruit that is canned in 100% fruit juice and vegetables that have “no salt of sodium added” for best options). They will last longer, are already cut up, and are usually a little cheaper.  Nutritionists have also shown that there is little difference between the nutrients you receive from fresh and frozen veggies, so go ahead and grab the frozen ones!  Large supermarkets and buying in bulk will usually have cheaper prices as opposed to local or specialty shops too.

Planning out weekly meals will also help to know what foods to buy in the grocery store to ensure that individuals are eating healthy every day. When working with the individual with a disability to plan out meals for the week make sure to keep it simple. Recipes that are too difficult or take too long to prepare can be discouraging and may make them not enjoy cooking and avoid it. Recipes should have no more than 5 or 6 ingredients. A good rule of thumb when helping individuals make their meal choices is to make sure that 3 of the 5 food groups are present in each plate. This will help to allow for the individual to choose foods they like, but still keep a balanced plate. Making a larger recipe that can be frozen and eaten again later in the week is also a good idea to have for nights when there is little time to cook instead of running out to a fast food restaurant. Cookbooks for individuals with disabilities, like Cooking By Color, help to clearly illustrate what ingredients are needed and how to prepare simple, yet healthy, meals in smaller portions. To learn more about Cooking By Color’s concept and planning for successful eating, check out author Joan Guthrie Medlen’s, HealthMeet webinar.

Many resources are out there to help teach the importance of keeping a balanced diet. Choosemyplate.gov and the CDC’s new Healthy Weight Issue Briefs provide information on obesity and maintaining a healthier diet. The Arc’s HealthMeet page contains resources and webinars regarding more healthy eating tips and links for further information.