Supporting The Age Wave: Baby Boomers and Autism

Since 2010, baby boomers in the United States have been turning 65 at the rate of approximately 10,000 a day. Some of these new baby boomers are people with autism. At the same time, over 3.5 million adults with autism and other developmental disabilities are living with family members. In nearly 25 percent of these households, the family caregivers are over 60 years of age. During Autism Acceptance month, we should address the challenges that the age wave creates for people with autism and their family members.

To start, people with autism over the age of 65 should learn about benefits that may be available to them in the disability and aging service systems. Learn about what public benefits the person with autism may be eligible for and apply for the appropriate benefits. In addition, Area Agencies on Aging (AAA) can help you access services and support available to seniors. AAAs offer a variety of home and community-based services such as respite, meals on wheels, and transportation. Visit www.ncoa.org for more information about additional benefits available to seniors.

Supporting aging parents of people with autism is another critical issue that needs to be addressed. In addition to the health and financial issues that all seniors face, caregivers are often overwhelmed by concern about what the future will look like for their son or daughter once they can no longer provide support. Although planning for the future can be challenging and emotional, it is necessary and possible.

Discussing these major life transitions and putting a plan in place may actually alleviate some of the stress experienced by adults with autism, their caregivers, and other family members. The Arc’s Center for Future Planning offers information and resources to adults with I/DD, aging caregivers, and other family members.

During Autism Acceptance Month, here are some ways you can access more help:

 

The Arc’s Center for Future Planning aims to support and encourage adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families to plan for the future. The Center provides reliable information and practical assistance to individuals with I/DD, their family members and friends, professionals who support them and other members of the community on areas such as person-centered planning, decision-making, housing options, and financial planning. Visit the Center’s website at futureplanning.thearc.org for more information.

The Arc to Launch New National Resource Center for Future Planning

The Arc is pleased to announce it has been awarded $800,000 over two years by the May and Stanley Smith Charitable Trust to develop a National Center on Future Planning for families and individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

The goal of this project is to support the estimated 600,000-700,000 families in the United States where an adult with I/DD is living with aging family members and there is no plan for the individual’s future.  The Center will empower aging caregivers to plan for the future of their adult son or daughter with I/DD, providing families with information, resources, and practical assistance in person-centered planning; guardianship and supported decision-making; housing and residential options and supports; special needs trust and representative payee services; financial planning; and personal care and independent living supports.

“There is a silent crisis facing our country that desperately needs a solution – what happens when there is no plan for how an individual with an intellectual or developmental disability will live life to the fullest when the loved one they live with is no longer with them?  In the last twenty years, people with disabilities have made great strides to live independently, be a part of their community, and experience all they want in life.  But too many people are facing the next chapter in their lives without a plan, and The Arc is seeking to provide help to families and people with disabilities looking for that roadmap,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc’s new Center for Future Planning will have a robust online presence, with an interactive and user-friendly website geared toward older learners, with extensive, vetted content.  The website will include a database of sources for local-and state-based information, people, and related organizations, and a searchable provider database.  The Arc will also operate a telephone and online information and referral system, connecting people to help in their communities.

Chapters of The Arc will play a critical role in this Center, as they will be able to access best practice protocols when providing future planning resources in their local communities.  The Center will also feature a National Pooled Special Needs Trust, develop protocols and business infrastructure to provide private trust companies with outsource assistance in servicing existing and future beneficiaries under individual special needs trusts, create training and networking opportunities for families and professionals in the field, and establish a volunteer action network.  This new network will pair self-advocates with volunteers without disabilities to visit people with I/DD in community settings and monitor their satisfaction and quality of life.

“This ambitious project aims to support people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families as they face a big transition in their lives.  Families and people with disabilities are seeking out these resources, and just as The Arc has done for last sixty years of this movement, we are innovating to be a leading resource into the future,” said Berns.