The Arc Calls on the Federal Government to Hire More People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Washington, DC – Yesterday, The Arc submitted comments to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) calling on the federal government to become a model employer of people with disabilities, including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

“While the last few years have seen some modest increases in the numbers of people with disabilities employed by the federal government, The Arc remains deeply concerned that many people with the most significant disabilities, including jobseekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are being left behind,” said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc.

Data obtained by The Arc from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) reveal that in fiscal year 2012, the federal government employed only 813 non-seasonal, full time permanent employees with intellectual disability (ID), representing 0.044% of all federal employees.   Only 28 people, or 3/100ths of one-percent of total new hires, were people with ID.  That same year, the federal government employed only 118 part-time employees with ID.  Only 17 people with ID were hired as part-time employees, about 9/100ths of one-percent of new hires.

“While we are pleased that the EEOC is moving forward with strengthening federal regulations, the shockingly low rate of federal employment of people with intellectual disability is unacceptable. The Arc calls on the federal government to act immediately to remove barriers to employment for people with disabilities in the federal workforce, establish strong goals for hiring of people with disabilities, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and hold agencies accountable for meeting those goals.

“There is no need for OPM to wait for the EEOC to complete the rulemaking process before it takes action to address this problem.  OPM already has authority under existing law and under Executive Order 13548 to take action now,” Berns said.

Issued by President Obama on July 26, 2010, E.O. 13548, titled “Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities,” calls on the Federal Government to hire 100,000 people with disabilities over five years.

“As a first step, OPM should direct federal agencies to update and revise the “agency-specific plans for promoting employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities” required under the Executive Order so that they specifically address employment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. There are other steps that can be taken today.   The Federal Communications Commission has already embarked on an initiative to hire people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in that agency.  Other agencies should get started too.

“Across the United States, The Arc has nearly 700 state and local chapters in 49 states and DC that stand ready to assist the federal government in identifying people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are ready to work and whose abilities will be an asset to federal agencies. The federal government can and should be a model employer of people with disabilities. The Arc will continue to closely monitor annual reports on the federal employment of people with disabilities to ensure progress and accountability,” said Berns.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly reports that the percentage of working-age people with disabilities in the labor force is about one-third that of persons with no disability. On average, workers with disabilities face significant gaps in pay and compensation, compared to workers with no disability. Additionally, about one in three employment discrimination charges filed with the EEOC allege discrimination on the basis of disability (often, in combination with charges of other types of discrimination).

The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker. In 2010, The Arc conducted a national online survey, called the FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Over 5,000 people participated. Only 15% of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with an intellectual and/or developmental disability was employed.

The Arc Commends Governor Jack Markell’s New Initiative to Employ Individuals with Disabilities

Washington, DC – This week, Delaware Governor Jack Markell was named Chair of the National Governors Association (NGA). Shortly after his appointment became official, the Governor announced that during his year-long term, his Chair’s initiative will be increasing employment among individuals with disabilities. The Arc fully supports Governor Markell’s efforts and applauds him for his work on behalf of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and other disabilities.

“Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are capable of excelling in the workforce and giving back to the communities in which they live. We commend Governor Markell for bringing national attention to the employment challenges facing individuals with disabilities and for working to create employment opportunities for them through innovative public-private partnerships.  The Arc has long recognized the need for employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and we look forward to supporting the Governor’s initiative,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

A major emphasis of the Governor’s initiative will be on people who have significant intellectual and developmental disabilities and may require supports like job coaches and personal attendants in order to live and work in the community. Throughout the year he will convene governors, businesses, disability leaders, and other thought leaders. The initiative will focus on educating public and private sector employers and supporting state governments to join with business partners to develop and build out blueprints to promote the hiring and retention of people with disabilities.

The Department of Labor released statistics in 2011 stating that 17.8 percent of Americans with a disability are employed, compared to 63.6 percent of those with no disability.  The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker.  In 2010, The Arc conducted and received over 5,000 responses to a national online survey called the Family and Individual Needs for Disability Supports, or FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Only 15% of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with I/DD was employed.

“The bottom line is that there are so many people with disabilities who have the time, talent and desire to make meaningful contributions to interested employers,” Governor Markell said. “More companies are recognizing that creating greater economic opportunity for these workers improves their own bottom line as well. It doesn’t matter whether you were born with additional challenges to face or – in the case of our wounded veterans for example – acquired them later in life. What matters is what you have to offer.”

Why FINDS Matters – An Addition to Your Advocacy Toolkit

FINDS report coverThe Arc’s amazing network of advocates has been working tirelessly to ensure that Medicaid does not suffer budget cuts with the “Don’t Cut Our Lifeline Campaign.” From the debt ceiling negotiations earlier this summer to current outreach to Members of Congress to ensure that individuals who rely on Medicaid do not lose essential services, our advocates have been busy this summer!

Hearing personal stories from individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families has helped make Members of Congress stop seeing Medicaid as just another entitlement program and see it as an important lifeline for millions of Americans. While these stories have helped to enlighten elected officials, many still don’t see the true scope of what Medicaid means to families across the country. This is where The Arc’s FINDS (The Family and Individual Needs for Disability Supports) Survey can help.

Have you read the report on The FINDS survey yet? You should. The startling results provide supporting data for the “Don’t Cut Our Lifeline” campaign. With over 5,000 parents, siblings, children, grandparents and relatives of individuals with I/DD surveyed, the results can’t be ignored. Most telling was the insight from caregivers about how they provide for the supports for their loved ones with I/DD:

  • Fifty-two percent of families use Medicaid funds to pay for long term care services and supports, primarily through the Medicaid HCBS Waiver program
  • People with severe I/DD were more likely to have reported getting supports from a family member paid through the HCBS Waiver program (59%), while people with mild I/DD were more likely to have received supports from a family member paid out of personal or family sources (56%), most often the personal income of a parent, family member or other caregiver
  • Nearly two-thirds of family caregivers (62%) are paying for some care out of pocket. Family caregivers struggle to find afterschool care (80%), reliable home care providers (84%) and community-based care (82%)

The challenges facing family caregivers also provide support for the “Don’t Cut Our Lifeline” campaign:

  • Overall, 62% report experiencing decreases in services and 32% were waiting for government funded services, most for more than 5 years
  • More than 40% of family caregivers reported the person with I/DD had unmet support needs during the last year for running errands or seeing a doctor (48%), managing finances (46%), transportation (45%) and household management (41%)

Many of you are living the reality behind these data points. The survey is a powerful tool you can use to get that point across to Members of Congress or others who can help the millions of families and individuals who depend on Medicaid. Find more information about how the FINDS results support the “Don’t Cut Our Lifeline” campaign, then find out more about what you can do to help here.

Another Perspective on Why FINDS Matters: On the Front Lines

FINDS report coverAs Project & Information Specialist with The Arc, I get the opportunity to hear from people all over the country on a daily basis about the challenges people with intellectual disabilities and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families face in their attempt to obtain services and supports for their loved one. For the past 15 years, I have heard from parents, grandparents, siblings, other relatives, friends, professionals and advocates from all walks of life, and the same recurring theme is boiled down into one question: We’ve tried that…NOW WHAT?

These worn-out, desperate individuals have turned everywhere they could think of looking for basic services for their loved one and have either 1) never been able to access them, or 2) the services were recently stopped due to lack of funding. Families often call our office as a last resort, and that’s why we work tirelessly to make sure their voices are heard. In fact, The Arc recently published The FINDS Survey (a report on Family and Individual Needs for Disability Supports) which explains the current challenges families are facing, and gives the individuals with intellectual disabilities and family members themselves the opportunity to share their own dreams and hopes for the future, and clearly state where our nation falls short in providing basic supports and services.

For example, we found that more than 75% of families can’t find afterschool care, non-institutional community services, trained reliable home care providers, summer, residential, respite and other services. This makes it incredibly hard, if not impossible, for families to support their loved one to become as independent as possible in the community. Also of concern, 62% of families report that services are being cut in the community, limiting or eliminating access to community life altogether.

The FINDS Survey validates that although great strides have been made in the areas of education, employment and inclusion in the community, there are still significant ways our country is falling short in providing the tools and resources families need. You can take a stand today! Learn more about The Arc’s call to action in the FINDS report and find out how, together, we can work to achieve better lives for people with intellectual disabilities and their families!

Why FINDS Matters

FINDS report coverOn June 14, 2011 at our press conference announcing the release of our report, Still in the Shadows with Their Future Uncertain, The Arc’s long time friend and colleague, Dr. K. Charlie Lakin, offered the following remarks about the importance of this research. Charlie has now moved on from his position at the University of Minnesota to take the helm at the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) of the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education and Rehabilitation Services. His comments at the press conference are well worth thinking about, and are as follows:

“Over my 25 or so years of association with The Arc as a member of various boards at the local, state and national level and as Chair of the Research Committee, one overarching idea has been that The Arc should always be a leader in the movement for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) – the first and foremost authority on the issues that concern those individuals. And, the first rule of leadership is to always listen carefully to the source of one’s authority. The Arc’s moral authority is derived directly from listening to and reflecting in its actions the will of those in whose name it exists. It is individuals with I/DD and their family members who founded The Arc, who currently sustain The Arc and who are the future of The Arc. They are The Arc.

“In that regard, it was important, even essential that The Arc engaged those primary stakeholders in providing the valuable information contained in the FINDS (Family and Individual Needs for Disability Supports) survey and summary report. . . . Advice is sometimes given that if one is not prepared to deal with the answer, then one shouldn’t ask the question. In asking the questions of this survey The Arc has challenged to respond not only in its advocacy, but also in service delivery. The Arc has committed itself to lead by its own example. It will become an organization to which the sizable majority people with developmental disabilities who want real work can turn to obtain real work. It will be an organization to which the majority of people who want support to live in their own homes or in homes with their family members can turn for in-home support. It will commit itself to divesting of the segregated vocational and congregate residential programs operating under its new, progressive logo. And as it has for 60 years it will continue to take the message of people with disabilities and their families to places of power to assure that the promises made to people with disabilities are promises kept.”

I invite you to dig into the data starting first with the FINDS report, Still in the Shadows with Their Future Uncertain, and then into the technical report and data tables if you are so inclined. Consider what it means for you and the people you care about and consider joining the movement or finding out more about what The Arc is doing for people with I/DD.

Families of The Arc Meet with White House on Medicaid Funding as Budget Deal Nears

WASHINGTON, DC – Today, families from West Virginia, Texas, Georgia, and Virginia joined The Arc at a meeting with Phil Schiliro, Assistant to the President and Special Advisor, John Carson, Deputy Assistant to the President, Jeff Crowley, Senior Advisor on Disability Policy, and Kareem Dale, Special Assistant to the President to discuss the impact on people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) if deep Medicaid cuts are included in a budget deal. As President Obama continues to engage in deficit reduction talks, The Arc, the nation’s largest and oldest human rights organization for people with I/DD, and its members are calling on Congress and the White House to keep Medicaid and programs that support those with I/DD intact.

Medicaid provides a critical lifeline for people with I/DD. It provides assistance with living in the community, respite services, assistance with daily living such as help getting dressed, taking medication, preparing meals, managing money, and getting in and out of bed. Nationwide, state and federal Medicaid together provide over 75% of the funding for these services for people with I/DD. Medicaid is also the primary source of health insurance for people with I/DD and provides needed health care services such as prescription drugs, dental, physical therapy, speech therapy, prosthetic devices, wheelchairs and other health care services for eligible people. Private insurance is often unavailable or unaffordable for people with I/DD due to discrimination in health insurance, high unemployment, and other factors.

“The Arc had the opportunity to touch the hearts and minds of some of the most powerful people in government today, and our message was clear – don’t cut the lifeline for these families. Medicaid is crucial to the health, well-­being, and future of these families, and without it, they would be forced to quit their jobs or sacrifice much of the progress their children have made with support from Medicaid,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

About the Keatons of Milton, West Virginia:

Amanda and Greg Keaton are parents of 18-­month-­old Graysen, who has DiGeorge Syndrome. DiGeorge syndrome is a disorder caused by a defect in chromosome 22, resulting in the poor development of several body systems. Graysen’s main medical conditions include two severe congenital heart defects -­ Tetralogy of Fallot and Pulmonary Atresia. In addition, Graysen has required a tracheostomy and ventilator support since 8 weeks old. Graysen spent his first six and a half months in the hospital, and his one year anniversary at home was June 21, 2011. In his young life, Graysen has suffered two strokes, undergone three open heart surgeries, a feeding tube placement, multiple heart catheterizations, and he hit the $1 million cap on his mother’s health insurance before he turned four months old. Graysen’s nursing care, specialized pediatric tube feedings, along with other important therapies and preventive medications and vaccines are covered by Medicaid through West Virginia’s Children with Disabilities Community Services Program.

About the O’Briens of Waycross, Georgia:

Deirdre O’Brien has two children, including her 13-­year-­old daughter, Clare, who has significant intellectual disabilities. Clare also suffers from abdominal migraines, which are similar to traditional migraines but the pain is in the stomach and causes her to vomit continuously for days. Two years ago, Clare’s migraines became very severe, occurring nearly every two weeks. Her hemoglobin dropped severely, she missed a significant amount of school and her parents missed work to take care of her. During this period, the O’Brien family saw no alternative but for Deirdre to quit her job and stay at home in case her daughter became ill. The state of Georgia recognized Clare’s needs and she was granted a small Medicaid home and community based waiver, which allowed Deirdre to hire staff to help care for her daughter.

About the Rodriguezes of Tomball, Texas:

Natalie and Ruben are parents of 31-­year-­old TJ, who was born with significant intellectual and developmental disabilities. TJ needs assistance with everyday activities like bathing, brushing his teeth, getting dressed in the morning, communicating effectively, walking,
and preparing his meals. As he has gotten older, TJ’s mobility challenges have greatly increased along with his medical needs. Medicaid covers TJ’s neurologist, endocrinologist, rehabilitation specialist, occasional home care, speech therapist, orthopedic specialist, primary care, and his prescriptions. In addition, through TJ’s Medicaid Home and Community Services slot, which took nine years to receive, his parents have been able to make modifications to their home that allow TJ to live with them, like ramps and bathroom modifications.

About the Brandts of Springfield, Virginia:

Carrin and Mitchell Brandt are parents of 10-­year-­old Bailey, who has an intractable (uncontrolled) seizure disorder, cerebral palsy, a history of aspiration and significant global delays. Bailey needs assistance and support with all daily living and recreational activities, and Medicaid helps pay for it. She has a shunt, a G-­tube, and uses a communication device. Bailey has had more than five seizures daily, and Medicaid paid for her brain surgery to remove her left hemisphere for better seizure control. Medicaid has paid for over fifteen seizure medications, one of which was over $1,000 for a one week supply. She has had orthopedic issues, including a hip displacement and a leg length discrepancy. When Bailey grows older, she will need Medicaid for long-­term support needs, such as residential and day support.

The stories these families have shared with the White House dramatically illustrate the findings from the The Arc’s recently released report Family and Individual Needs for Disability Supports (FINDS). The FINDS survey of nearly 5,000 family respondents demonstrates that families across the country have similar experiences. For example:

  • One-­third of parents and caregivers reported that they are on waiting lists for government funded services, with the average wait more than five years.
  • One out of five families report that someone in the family had to quit a job to stay at home and support the needs of a family member.
  • Most family caregivers (58%) provide more than 40 hours of care per week (including 40% who provide more than 80 hours of care per week). This interferes with their work (71%) and causes physical (88%) and financial strain (81%).
  • Sixty two percent of caregivers reported a decrease in services for their family member with a disability.

“These statistics came to life at the White House today, as these families exemplify what it means to be on a waiting list for services for nine years, and what life looks like when parents face a choice between working and caring for their loved one,” said Marty Ford, The Arc’s public policy director.

Groundbreaking FINDS Report Picked up by National Media

Peter Berns and Lauren Potter

The Arc CEO Peter Berns and Glee actress Lauren Potter

The Arc recently released the results of its groundbreaking Families and Individual Needs for Disability Support (FINDS) survey and media across the country have been covering the startling statistics.  A major goal for this project has been to raise awareness of The Arc and the urgent unmet needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), and the media has responded by reporting  findings from the survey to the general public and highlighting the work of local chapters.

We know that while we have come a long way in promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD, there is still much more work to be done.  Throughout our efforts to bring about greater awareness, two findings from the survey have struck a nerve – one-third of parents and caregivers (potentially 1 million families) reported that they are on waiting lists for government funded services, with the average wait more than five years.  And in this recession, 62 percent of caregivers reported a decrease in services for their family member with a disability, leaving them financially vulnerable.

On the morning of June 14, we released Still in the Shadows with Their Future Uncertain, our report on the FINDS data. The Arc’s CEO Peter V. Berns and Lauren Potter, star of the hit FOX show “Glee,” participated in more than twenty television and radio interviews in top media markets across the nation, including Boston and Greensboro, NC.  Peter and Lauren shared the findings of the report and talked about what needs to be done to improve the lives of people with I/DD.  Following these interviews, The Arc hosted a press conference at the National Press Club to officially unveil the report, and the national newswire Reuters quickly ran a story.  Throughout the day, media continued to pick up on the report, interviewing local Arc executive directors and self-advocates, like Jamie Liban and Katherine Olson from The Arc of Virginia who did an in-studio interview at WTVR in Richmond.

The FINDS survey continues to have momentum, as Health & Home Report, one of the longest running syndicated video magazines on television, will begin airing on July 1st one of the television interviews with Peter and Lauren.  Health & Home Report is hosted by an award winning reporter and anchor, Laura DeAngelis, and has gained a loyal following because of its useful consumer tips and interesting stories.  The show is distributed to 20 broadcast stations and 91 cable systems across the country, reaching an audience between 3 to 4 million.

We encourage you to read the FINDS survey report and spread the word about The Arc’s call-to-action to motivate 1 million Americans to join the movement for people with I/DD. Use this information to make the case to everyone you know that more needs to be done to help people with I/DD be fully included and participate in the community throughout their lifetimes. Build on the publicity generated by media coverage of the report and share this blog with your networks. Thank you!

New Survey Shows Urgent Unmet Needs for Disability Support

FINDS report coverThe Arc recently had the opportunity to measure the urgent, unmet needs of individuals and families living with I/DD and find out where our society is succeeding in offering them support and where we’re falling short. In conjunction with researchers at the University of Minnesota, we conducted an unprecedented survey of more than 5000 individuals with I/DD, their family members and caregivers covering a host of issues from education to housing to planning for the future and discovered that many with I/DD are unnecessarily living in the shadows of society for lack of support to meet their most basic needs.

This week, we released the top findings from that survey in a publication called Still in the Shadows with Their Future Uncertain and outlined the steps we need to take as individuals, as families, as advocates and as a country to address the most pressing needs. Here are just a few of the most dramatic findings from the survey that should inspire us to action.

  • 62% of caregivers report that the level of services for their family member with a mild or moderate disability is decreasing; 70% of families with severe disabilities report a decrease in services.
  • 72% of family respondents provide direct financial support to their family member with disabilities and 52% of families are paying for care out of their own income.
  • More than 80% of families reported not having enough retirement savings for their future as a result of using personal funds to compensate for the lack of services available to their loved one.

We invite you to read the full report available now and join us in our movement through the call to action outlined in the report. Or, find out more about how you can get involved with The Arc to help bring about positive change, offer opportunity and foster hope for people with I/DD everywhere.

New Data Reveals Our Nation is Neglecting People With Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Survey findings from human rights organization, The Arc, reveal nation’s efforts fail to provide fundamentals for individuals and families

WASHINGTON, D.C. (June 14, 2011) – Fifty years ago, President Kennedy called on the nation to bring people living with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) “out of the shadows,” to give them opportunities to lead productive, quality lives. Sadly, new data released today from The Arc’s Families and Individual Needs for Disability Support (FINDS) survey shows efforts have plateaued and not nearly enough progress has been made to create these opportunities. While budget cuts and economic strain have hurt all Americans, the 7 million living with I/DD and their families are among the hardest hit, with access to needed services drastically reduced.  In fact, 62 percent of caregivers reported a decrease in services for their family member with a disability.  Meanwhile, budget proposals in Congress threaten to dismantle Medicaid, making it even harder for people with I/DD and their families to achieve.

The Arc, the nation’s largest and oldest human rights organization for the I/DD community serving more than a million individuals and their families, conducted a national survey of nearly 5,000 respondents on educational, housing, employment and support needs.  The results of this landmark survey are being released in a report today, “Still in the Shadows with Their Future Uncertain.”

According to the FINDS survey, one-third of parents and caregivers (potentially 1 million families) reported that they are on waiting lists for government funded services, with the average wait more than five years.  The survey also found that the promise of integrated, community-based employment is not being met.  In fact, 85 percent of families reported that their adult family members with I/DD are not employed at all.  Opportunities for inclusive education, a pre-requisite for employment, are also not being met.  Too few students are completing high school – in fact, 52 percent of families reported that their family member with I/DD left school without receiving a high school diploma.

“People with I/DD have a fundamental moral and civil right to be fully included in all aspects of society.  Every day, The Arc promotes and protects the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supports their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetime,” says Peter V. Berns, chief executive officer of The Arc and newly appointed member of President Barack Obama’s Committee for People with Intellectual Disabilities (May 2011). “Although we have made some progress as a nation over the last 50 years, our nation has an obligation to do much more.”

“Yet we are on the brink of taking giant steps backward, and the future is uncertain for these individuals and their families. The vast majority of individuals with I/DD live with their parents. So, when their parents can no longer emotionally or financially support them, who will? Without any concrete measures to protect these individuals and proposals to end Medicaid as we know it on the table in Washington, we have a train wreck waiting to happen.”

FINDS found more than 75 percent of families report problems accessing non-institutional community care, trained reliable homecare providers, services and resources.  Families are shouldering tremendous financial strain as they’ve had to assume the financial and day-to-day support of their loved ones; many have even had to quit their jobs to stay home and provide care.

FINDS also revealed:

  • 1 out of 5 families (20 percent) report that someone in the family had to quit a job to stay at home and support the needs of a family member.
  • More than 80 percent of families reported not having enough retirement savings for their future as a result of using personal funds to compensate for the lack of services available to their loved ones.
  • 62 percent of parents and caregivers don’t have a plan for where the person they support will live when the parent/caregiver gets older.

As a result of the report, The Arc is calling for more activism by people with I/DD and their families, launching a new effort to organize 1 million people to come out of the shadows and make their needs and concerns an issue in the 2012 elections.

To raise awareness surrounding the barriers those with I/DD face and how the organization can help individuals and families fully participate in society, The Arc has partnered with Lauren Potter, star of the hit FOX show “Glee.”  As a successful actress with Down syndrome who is achieving her dreams, Lauren represents the spirit of The Arc’s work.  Today, The Arc and Potter will kick off a public service announcement television campaign.

“I became involved with The Arc when I got the Image and Inclusion award last year.  I am happy to be able to help portray a positive image of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.  I’m glad the Arc works to protect human rights of children and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities,” says Potter.

The Arc “Achieve with Us” Contest
To encourage people with I/DD to share their stories of achievement, The Arc is conducting a national contest via their Facebook fan page.   Starting today until July 14, entrants can share a story and a photo highlighting the accomplishments of an individual with I/DD for the chance to receive a trip for two to Washington, D.C.  For more information about the “Achieve with Us” contest, please visit www.facebook.com/thearcus.

For more information, or to see additional survey results, please visit thearc.org.

About the FINDS Survey

The web-based FINDS survey was conducted from July 22, 2010, through October 31, 2010. The survey was completed by 4,962 caregivers of people with disabilities.  Families from all 50 states and Washington, DC completed the survey. 

The Arc Launches Dynamic New National Brand Identity

Washington, D.C. – The Arc, the largest organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, FASD, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses, is changing its look and adopting a new visual identity. The Arc is joined in the launch of this rebranding initiative by state and local chapters representing more than 30 states.

“This is an exciting time in The Arc’s history,” said Peter V. Berns, CEO of The Arc. Our powerful, new, shared identify reflects the energy and the action of our organization as we work to transform the lives of people with I/DD.  This impactful and fresh identity will move us further in revitalizing The Arc – an organization that has been on the frontlines of advocacy and service for over 60 years –by harnessing the incredible power of those we serve.”

The Arc’s vibrant new logo and tagline communicate the organization’s commitment to promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes. The Arc’s logo is
emblematic of the organization’s embracing nature with the flowing “catalyst” icon; a burst of energy is symbolic of our support of independence. The new tagline, Achieve with us, conveys The Arc as a provider of opportunity, hope, growth and change.

The Arc’s new identity grew out of a lengthy, collaborative effort that began in spring 2008 and has involved literally thousands of The Arc’s volunteer and staff leaders, constituents and other stakeholders to create a visionary plan for the future: The Strategic Framework 2010-2019. A survey of chapters of The Arc demonstrated widespread support to rebrand and create a more compelling vision for The Arc.

The launch of The Arc’s new brand coincides with the commemoration of Developmental Disability Awareness Month in March. Nearly a quarter century ago, The Arc’s advocacy led to President Ronald Reagan officially proclaiming March to be Developmental Disabilities (DD) Awareness Month. Chapters of The Arc across the nation are celebrating DD Awareness Month with special events and activities. Over the past six decades, The Arc has championed groundbreaking legislation that has improved the lives of people with I/DD.

“There is tremendous energy and ‘buzz’ as we begin to implement The Arc’s new brand identity” said Mohan Mehra, Board President of The Arc. “This will help raise public awareness of The Arc and translate to greater support at both the local and national levels. I am especially invested in the new brand and have been involved since the start of the process. Having served as a business manager with Kraft Foods with experience in business strategy, marketing and sales I know that a new brand can make a real difference.”

The Arc selected CoreBrand, an award-winning branding firm, to design and execute the new identity led by Brand Director Jonathan Paisner.  “As a branding consultant, this was the rare opportunity to help discover and unleash a powerful brand simply waiting to be born,” Paisner said.  “A true collective voice –- one shared by and reflected in over 700 chapters – will certainly be a boon to fundraising, volunteerism and visibility in the corporate world. Yet the true impact of a greater national presence will ultimately bring all of these elements together to advance The Arc’s goals of inclusion, hope, opportunity and achievement.”

The look and feel of the new brand will advance further with the May 10, 2011 national announcement of The Arc’s FINDS (Family and Individual Needs for Disability Supports) survey results at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C.  The FINDS survey will yield a candid and current view on issues concerning the needs for disability supports across the lifespan. This unprecedented assessment of data from nearly 6,000 individuals will enable those in the field to better understand what services are available, what gaps exist and what new supports are needed.

Today, across the United States, the 700+ chapters of The Arc share common goals:

  • The Arc is embracing, determined and experienced in promoting and protecting the rights of people with I/DD;
  • The Arc provides key needed services and supports across the arc of a lifetime and across diagnoses, such as Down syndrome, autism and many other intellectual and developmental disabilities.
  • The Arc is banding together around the new and vigorous identity that embodies the energy and movement of The Arc to help people with I/DD feel empowered and included.

“We are thrilled,” Berns added, “that upon the launch today we will have more than 150 of The Arc’s state and local chapters simultaneously unveil The Arc’s new brand identity in communities across the country.  With close to 25% of chapters of The Arc on board already, and more chapters signing on daily, the successful implementation of our new brand strategy is well underway,” Berns explained.