Meet the Hometown Host: Baymont and The Arc Reimagine Breakfast Furthering Opportunities for People with Disabilities

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PARSIPPANY, N.J. (December 1, 2016) – Baymont Inn & Suites unites with The Arc – a leading national advocate for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) – to open more doors in hospitality for individuals with I/DD, including autism and Down syndrome, as the hotel brand redefines breakfast with its new Hometown Host role.

Baymont Inn & Suites is redefining traditional hotel breakfast with its new Hometown Host role. Elizabeth, pictured above, is a Hometown Host at the Baymont in Newark, Del.

Baymont Inn & Suites is redefining traditional hotel breakfast with its new Hometown Host role. Elizabeth, pictured above, is a Hometown Host at the Baymont in Newark, Del.

Unveiled just before International Day of Persons with Disabilities on December 3, 2016, Baymont’s new Hometown Host role is a symbol of the brand’s emphasis on neighborly service and dedication to community, ensuring guests are feeling welcome and food is abundant throughout daily breakfast service. Baymont franchisees recruiting for a Hometown Host are encouraged to take advantage of The Arc’s resources in helping connect them with passionate local job candidates within their neighborhoods.

In addition to serving as a service champion and breakfast attendant, Hometown Hosts from Baymont hotels across the country are invited to participate in a voluntary advisory council, supported by The Arc, to help improve the brand’s breakfast offerings. The council will meet regularly to share insights and best practices for perfecting the brand’s free breakfast for guests.

“No matter what’s on the table, we believe breakfast is best served and savored with good company. That’s where our Hometown Hosts come in: they’re the first person greeting our guests in the morning and ensuring they have a great start to the day,” said Greg Giordano, Baymont Inn & Suites brand vice president. “Our collaboration with The Arc not only connects our franchisees to a resource attracting associates who embody our signature culture of neighborly hospitality for guests, but also demonstrates to all communities of diversity they have an advocate in Baymont.”

Building Opportunities One Breakfast at a Time
Unemployment among people living with disabilities is a critical issue. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, unemployment rate for individuals with disabilities is higher than 11%, approximately double the nation’s average. Of those employed, only about 40% hold regular jobs in the community rather than within sheltered workshops or other restricted settings. The Arc serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, a population in which unemployment is much higher – 85% of families report that their adult family members with I/DD are not employed.

“Our collaboration with Baymont proactively creates opportunities for both those with disabilities and hoteliers to make positive and transformative contributions within their communities,” said Jonathan Lucus, director, The Arc@Work. “Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are not only capable of excelling on the job, but have experience, ideas and perspectives to continually enrich businesses. We can’t wait to see how our relationship with Baymont shakes up the makeup of hotel breakfast.”

The Arc@Work is leading the way in developing innovative workforce solutions for the government and private sector by connecting employers with talented employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities and supporting the recruitment, on-boarding, and retention process. The goal is to connect organizations with people and services that increase the diversity, productivity, and quality of their overall workforce.

Hotels including the Baymont Inn & Suites Augusta Riverwatch in Georgia have already experienced positive results employing individuals with disabilities including longer tenure, strong enthusiasm and an increase in guest engagement. Baymont hotels in Florida, Pennsylvania, and Michigan, one of the states with the lowest workforce participation rates for people with disabilities, have already pledged to work with The Arc as part of this initiative.

“We’ve been employing individuals with disabilities for more than 10 years at our hotel, and it’s the best business decision I’ve ever made,” said Kanta Kondur, owner of Baymont Inn & Suites August Riverwatch. “Our associates, like William and Robert, quickly become part of the Baymont family and show an extraordinary dedication to the hotel and our guests. I have no doubt other Baymont owners will find similar success working with The Arc.”

About The Arc
The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, Autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, Cerebral Palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

About Baymont Inn & Suites
Part of Wyndham Hotel Group, the Baymont Inn & Suites® hotel brand is a chain of more than 400 midscale hotels located throughout the United States and in Mexico that takes pride in neighborly hospitality grounded in the ability to connect with every guest. It’s all about warm, inviting service, topped with freshly baked cookies and a friendly smile. Many locations feature free Wi-Fi, continental breakfast at the Baymont Breakfast Corner®, swimming pools, fitness centers, airport shuttle service and the opportunity to earn and redeem points through Wyndham Rewards®, the brand’s guest loyalty program. Travelers can join the free program at www.wyndhamrewards.com.   Each Baymont Inn & Suites hotel is independently owned and operated under a franchise agreement with Baymont Franchise Systems, Inc. (BFS), or its affiliate. BFS is a subsidiary of Wyndham Hotel Group, LLC and parent company Wyndham Worldwide Corporation (NYSE: WYN). Reservations and information are available by visiting www.baymontinns.com.

Wyndham Hotel Group is the world’s largest hotel company based on number of hotels, encompassing nearly 8,000 hotels and approximately 689,800 rooms in 75 countries. Additional information is available at www.wyndhamworldwide.com. For more information about hotel franchising opportunities visit www.whgdevelopment.com.

CONTACT:
Gabriella Chiera
Wyndham Hotel Group
(973) 753 – 6689
Gabriella.chiera@wyn.com

Kristen McKiernan
The Arc
(202) 534-3712
mckiernan@thearc.org

The Arc@Work Lands Investment in Employment Placement Services from The Walmart Foundation

Washington, DC – The Arc’s employment program, The Arc@Work, is pleased to announce it has received a $245,000, one-year grant from the Walmart Foundation. This funding will be dedicated toward developing innovative programs that place people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in competitive, integrated employment within their communities.

Current research indicates that 85% of people with I/DD are unemployed. The Arc is working with the public and private sectors to change this reality and offer an opportunity for people with I/DD to obtain meaningful career opportunities alongside people without disabilities on an unprecedented scale. New developments include a government directive to hire 100,000 employees with disabilities as well as updated regulations for federal contractors. As a result, the federal government and more than 45,000 contractors that include many Fortune 500 companies are now seeking employees with disabilities like never before. Unfortunately, this current demand cannot be matched by existing workforce systems that support the I/DD community. And without a strong, unified pipeline in place, this population will not benefit from these new guidelines as much as other disability groups.

“For far too long, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities have been relegated to the margins of the working world. Along with private initiatives, new government regulations promise to dramatically increase the number of people with disabilities placed alongside of people without disabilities in integrated, competitive environments. The support from the Walmart Foundation will allow The Arc to build a system that will transform the existing pool of talented candidates with disabilities into productive employees,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc@Work is well-positioned to tackle this challenge, as it has the expertise and resources to harness the current social, political, and philanthropic energy behind workforce development efforts for people with I/DD. For this particular project, The Arc@Work will utilize existing infrastructure, as well as tap sixteen chapters of The Arc to create an increased number of corporate hiring opportunities. Ultimately this model will connect well-qualified job seekers with I/DD to local, regional, and national employers. The chapters that will be involved include UCP Seguin (IL); The Arc of the Midlands (SC); The Arc of Spokane; The Arc of Anchorage (AK); The Arc of Montgomery County (MD); The Arc of El Paso (TX); The Arc of Monroe County (NY); St. Louis Arc (MO); The Arc of Chester County (PA); Berkshire County Arc (MA); Star, Inc. (CT); The Arc of North Carolina (NC); The Arc Davidson County and Greater Nashville (TN); VersAbility (VA); The Arc of Bristol County (MA); and ADEC (IN), each of which will receive an average sub-grant award of $10,000.

Many of these chapters currently offer high-quality employment services for people with I/DD, such as job development, job coaching, as well as skill-building opportunities like preparation for interviews and resume development. Under their guidance, people with I/DD will receive support to secure competitive employment in their communities. Additionally, over the project period, the chapters of The Arc will strengthen their capacity to place people with I/DD into integrated, community-based employment by developing or deepening partnerships with local, regional, and national employers during the project period. Local, regional, or national employers will be able to improve their ability to successfully employ people with I/DD as a result of their partnership with The Arc.

“This grant is an example of the Walmart Foundation’s commitment to modeling one of our core values – Respect for the Individual, “said Carol May, Program Manager of the Walmart Foundation. “We desire to see communities empower all individuals to reach their full potential.”

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Max Goldstein: Engineering His Future

In honor of National Disability Employment Month, we interviewed Max, a member of The Arc of the Midlands. A young man with autism, Max’s passion for technology recently led him to pursue and ultimately secure a position at the technology giant Microsoft. Let’s catch up with him to see how his journey to one of the top employers in the world started as well as learn some of his secrets of success.

Max’s path to competitive, integrated employment began at The Arc, and its affiliate, The Arc of the Midlands in South Carolina. Tapping into the parent organization’s The Arc@Work IT training program, Max was quickly connected with two additional organizations: first, Specialisterne USA, the U.S-based affiliate of Specialisterne Foundation. Specialisterne USA mission is to create 100,000 jobs for people with autism in North America, and second, Provail, a Seattle-based agency that assists businesses in hiring and training qualified job seekers with disabilities. Armed with these resources, Max embarked on a hiring process that would lead to the opportunity of a lifetime. He first participated in phone interviews with The Arc of the Midlands, then completed some reading tasks from Specialisterne, and finally, submitted a short project demonstrating his programming abilities. Once this stage was completed, Max flew to Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Washington where he participated in a two-week evaluation period. During this time, he completed short programming assignments, as well as was informally interviewed by several hiring managers. This gave Max the opportunity to showcase his skills and assess fit with various Microsoft teams.

On the last two days of the evaluation period, Max had formal interviews with two hiring managers where he fielded more technical questions. Normally, this would be followed by an additional swath of analytical problems. But, in one of the interviews, the manager voluntarily waived this additional step, explaining “…it was unnecessary…to do a whiteboard problem….as [he] had assessed [his] skills between the informal interviews and reviewing [his] coding assignment”. This manager further advised “The whiteboard problem is one of the most widely used ways to assess a software engineer’s problem-solving skills, and skipping it (especially at Microsoft’s level) was a complete shock”. Even Max’s fellow candidates were amazed!

Shortly after the conclusion of the evaluation period, Max learned that both hiring managers extended a job offer! After much consideration, he accepted the position in the Core Operating System – Windows Fundamentals Division, primarily because of his interest in operating systems development. Shortly after officially accepting, Max eagerly began the on-boarding process.

Max now spends his days coding and engaging in problem solving sessions on Microsoft products. Often, this involves a number of cross-team meetings and lengthy discussions of new features. It is these moments that excite Max the most because he loves “designing and implementing complex solutions to complex problems”. For him, it’s “like solving a puzzle”.

Max is quick to credit The Arc of the Midlands and The Arc@Work for his success in his job search. Beyond guiding him through the initial interview process, staff connected him with rehabilitation services in his new state, and provided him with various resources and training prior to his interview. When asked to advise other job-seekers with disabilities, he comments: “Persistence is the key. Keep working on and refining your strengths and unique skillsets, as you’ll improve on them a lot quicker than your weaknesses…..You’ll eventually find an organization that recognizes your abilities and will hire you.” The new Microsoft hire further implores those currently in the job market to take advantage of all the support The Arc and its chapters have to offer: “[P]lease use resources like The Arc that help people with disabilities. They are more understanding of your situation than any other group out there, and will help you with your job search and your life in general.”

The Arc Launches TalentScout – Guide for Employers on How to Successfully Employ People with Autism

TalentScoutWashington, DC – One in 68 children today are being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).  The unemployment rate of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including ASDs, is 85 percent.  This appalling statistic coupled with the increase in prevalence of kids being diagnosed demands action from all sectors of our economy to ensure that people with ASDs are finding appropriate employment at a fair wage, and retaining that job with the proper supports to be successful and have a career of their choosing, just like people without disabilities.
With nearly 65 years of experience working with and serving people with I/DD, including autism, The Arc is launching an exciting new resource called TalentScout for employers to unlock the talents of people with autism in the workplace.  TalentScout is a first of its kind resource toolkit that gives employers essential insight and tools that harnesses their employees with autism fullest potential and leads to higher levels of productivity in the workplace.

“People with autism have a lot to contribute in all aspects of our society.  In the workplace, their individual unique talents need to be maximized to benefit both the goals of their employer, and their personal desire to have and keep a job that adds meaning to their life.  Far too many people with autism are left on the sidelines of our workforce, and entities that have recognized the benefits of hiring someone with autism are reaping the rewards.  Whether it’s the loyalty that someone with a disability may bring to their employer, or their unique skill set that gets the job done, people with autism are ready for hire,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

TalentScout is a valuable resource for government agencies that are working to implement President Obama’s initiative (EO 13548) to hire 100,000 people with disabilities into the federal government workforce, and for federal government contractors who need to bring their companies in compliance with the new 503 regulations on employment of people with disabilities.  These new regulations require federal contractors to conduct targeted outreach to the disability community, establish a 7% workforce utilization goal; implement data collection mechanisms to measure effectiveness of affirmative action, provide invitation to applicants and existing employees to voluntarily self-identify, and to perform an annual evaluation to measure outcomes.

The Arc is providing a unique resource for employers in that TalentScout’s content has been vetted by people with autism, and it includes their first-hand accounts and insights as job applicants and employees. It is backed by the years of nationwide experience of The Arc’s vast chapter network, and by Autism Now: National Autism Resource and Information Center.

“TalentScout is an extremely valuable guide. This sets the bar high for employers,” Jose Velasco, SAP, Head, Autism at Work Program.

“The personal stories and insights took this document to another level,” Kristie King, Comcast/NBC Universal, Manager, Diversity Recruitment.

TalentScout is one component of TheArc@Work, which is leading the way in developing innovative workforce solutions for the government and private sector by connecting employers with talented employees with I/DD and supporting the recruitment, on-boarding, and retention process.

Building Vocational Success at The Arc of Carroll County

April is Autism Acceptance Month, and in honor of the launch of The Arc’s new initiative TalentScout, we at The Arc of Carroll County wanted to highlight some of the programs we are implementing to improve the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in the workforce.

 

Preparing for Success

The Arc of Carroll CountyFor the past 16 years, The Arc of Carroll County has had several educational partnerships to provide support to high school students and students in the Post-Secondary Program. One of these is VOICE, which teaches how to work with others, understanding the role of a job coach, and employer expectations. Another, TCP, focuses on the school-to-work transition and consists of locating job leads, filling out applications, interviewing, and being independent on the job.

Over the summer, we offer the Summer Youth Employment program for eligible high school and post-secondary participants. Through the program, participants have the opportunity to work in community businesses over the summer with the support of a job coach. This is paid employment, and plans are person-centered to identify unique supports for each person served.

A service we offer specifically for adults on the spectrum is Job Hunters. Coursework covers developing job skills, cover letter and resume writing, dressing for success, and other abilities. While the class itself is 10 weeks, it doesn’t end there! After the course is done, we continue to work with you until you become successfully employed. Last year, we successfully helped a student named Conner develop his skills and secure a job at the Westminster Home Goods for the holiday season. Now, Conner has made huge strides (all the way across the world!) and is residing in Japan looking for work teaching English to Japanese students.

 

Continued Support

The services don’t stop once someone has found employment. If specialized skills are required, we provide customized training to meet individualized employer needs. Program Coordinators and Employment specialists continue to work with individuals to liaise between the employee and employer to optimize vocational success.

Our Vocational Program, which follows a Place-Train-Maintain model, provides support, instruction, training, and supervision if necessary to maximize independence in the workplace. Some of the ways we do this are through job sampling, shadowing, and enclaves. One of the most unique parts of this program is Supported Enterprise, which assists individuals who are interested in starting their own small business through developing business plans and identifying funding sources. Our hope is that these participants may one day end up at Entrepreneur Alley during The Arc’s National Convention.

We believe that everyone has a right to meaningful and gainful employment, and that community services through The Arc’s chapters are a paramount tool in achieving this.

Federal Hiring of People with Disabilities Continues to Disappoint

Washington, DC – The federal government’s Office of Personnel Management (OPM) recently released Fiscal Year 2013 data on the hiring of people with disabilities in the government’s workforce. Once again, the report demonstrates that hiring of people with targeted disabilities, including intellectual disability (ID), continues to lag, and the federal government is missing an opportunity to be a model employer of people with disabilities.

“While the last few years have seen some modest increases in the numbers of people with disabilities employed by the federal government, The Arc remains deeply concerned that many people with the most significant disabilities, including jobseekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are being left behind. The federal government should implement the strategies the Department of Labor has laid out to meet their goal, and that should involve working with organizations like The Arc, with our nearly 700 chapters across the country, to proactively fill job openings with people with disabilities qualified for a variety of positions open in our government,” said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc.

The federal government, through the Department of Labor, has initiated a new effort to increase the number of people with disabilities employed by entities that contract with the government, asking contractors to aspire to a goal of 7 percent of their workforce with disabilities. In explaining why there is a need to step up hiring of people with disabilities, the Department of Labor has stated: “A substantial disparity in the employment rate of individuals with disabilities continues to persist despite years of technological advancements that have made it possible for people with disabilities to apply for and successfully perform a broad array of jobs.” Meanwhile, in Fiscal Year 2013, the federal government only hired 1,389 people with targeted disabilities, representing 1.32 percent of new hires overall. The category of targeted disabilities includes people with intellectual disability (ID).

One factor in the federal hiring picture is the congressionally mandated budget cuts known as sequestration. These cuts forced federal agencies to put in place furloughs, hiring freezes, and reduce overtime. These budget cuts have trickled down to impact hiring of all new employees, including people with disabilities. Several federal agencies, however, have used their Schedule A hiring authority to make hiring people with disabilities a priority. The Schedule A process is a non-competitive hiring method that provides people with disabilities a path to federal employment.

“The numbers demonstrate that successful employment for people with disabilities is doable with the Schedule A process. Agencies that haven’t used this tool in their toolbox should look to their peers for guidance on how to improve their outreach, in addition to utilizing the competitive process to reach people with disabilities that match the skill sets needed for job opportunities,” said Berns.

The agencies that have demonstrated willingness to hire via with Schedule A include the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Labor, the Office of Personnel Management, and the Treasury Department. However, 14 agencies hired no people using this hiring authority in 2013, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Federal Trade Commission, and Department of Housing and Urban Development, which each made over 100 new hires but none through Schedule A.

One federal agency that The Arc has recently partnered with to boost the number of people with intellectual disability employed is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). They have hired five individuals at GS3 and GS4 levels with the opportunity to be promoted to a GS5.

In July, The Arc submitted comments to the EEOC calling on the federal government to become a model employer of people with disabilities, including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

“While we are pleased that the EEOC is moving forward with strengthening federal regulations, the shockingly low rate of federal employment of people with intellectual disability persists. Agencies can act now to step up their efforts,” said Berns.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly reports that the percentage of working-age people with disabilities in the labor force is about one-third that of persons with no disability. On average, workers with disabilities face significant gaps in pay and compensation, compared to workers with no disability. Additionally, about one in three employment discrimination charges filed with the EEOC allege discrimination on the basis of disability (often, in combination with charges of other types of discrimination).

The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker. In 2010, The Arc conducted a national online survey, called the FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Over 5,000 people participated. Only 15 percent of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with an intellectual and/or developmental disability was employed.

The Arc Calls on the Federal Government to Hire More People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Washington, DC – Yesterday, The Arc submitted comments to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) calling on the federal government to become a model employer of people with disabilities, including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

“While the last few years have seen some modest increases in the numbers of people with disabilities employed by the federal government, The Arc remains deeply concerned that many people with the most significant disabilities, including jobseekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are being left behind,” said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc.

Data obtained by The Arc from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) reveal that in fiscal year 2012, the federal government employed only 813 non-seasonal, full time permanent employees with intellectual disability (ID), representing 0.044% of all federal employees.   Only 28 people, or 3/100ths of one-percent of total new hires, were people with ID.  That same year, the federal government employed only 118 part-time employees with ID.  Only 17 people with ID were hired as part-time employees, about 9/100ths of one-percent of new hires.

“While we are pleased that the EEOC is moving forward with strengthening federal regulations, the shockingly low rate of federal employment of people with intellectual disability is unacceptable. The Arc calls on the federal government to act immediately to remove barriers to employment for people with disabilities in the federal workforce, establish strong goals for hiring of people with disabilities, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and hold agencies accountable for meeting those goals.

“There is no need for OPM to wait for the EEOC to complete the rulemaking process before it takes action to address this problem.  OPM already has authority under existing law and under Executive Order 13548 to take action now,” Berns said.

Issued by President Obama on July 26, 2010, E.O. 13548, titled “Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities,” calls on the Federal Government to hire 100,000 people with disabilities over five years.

“As a first step, OPM should direct federal agencies to update and revise the “agency-specific plans for promoting employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities” required under the Executive Order so that they specifically address employment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. There are other steps that can be taken today.   The Federal Communications Commission has already embarked on an initiative to hire people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in that agency.  Other agencies should get started too.

“Across the United States, The Arc has nearly 700 state and local chapters in 49 states and DC that stand ready to assist the federal government in identifying people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are ready to work and whose abilities will be an asset to federal agencies. The federal government can and should be a model employer of people with disabilities. The Arc will continue to closely monitor annual reports on the federal employment of people with disabilities to ensure progress and accountability,” said Berns.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly reports that the percentage of working-age people with disabilities in the labor force is about one-third that of persons with no disability. On average, workers with disabilities face significant gaps in pay and compensation, compared to workers with no disability. Additionally, about one in three employment discrimination charges filed with the EEOC allege discrimination on the basis of disability (often, in combination with charges of other types of discrimination).

The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker. In 2010, The Arc conducted a national online survey, called the FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Over 5,000 people participated. Only 15% of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with an intellectual and/or developmental disability was employed.

The Arc Applauds Passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

The Arc released the following statement applauding the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).  WIOA is a bipartisan, bicameral compromise between the SKILLS Act (H.R. 803), which passed the House of Representatives in March of 2013, and the Workforce Investment Act of 2013 (S. 1356), which passed the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee in July of 2013. The proposal was developed by Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA), Representative John Kline (R-MN), Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Representative George Miller (D-CA), Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), Representative Virginia Foxx (R-NC), Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA), and Representative Rubén Hinojosa (D-TX).

“Everyone should have the opportunity to earn a competitive salary while contributing to their community, which is why we are thrilled with the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. The Arc applauds the bill’s focus on integrated, competitive employment for individuals with disabilities, and on essential transition services for youth with disabilities who need them to attain and hold a job. We are grateful to the Members of Congress who developed and supported this important legislation and stood up for individuals with disabilities who want to work, but need additional supports to reach their career goals,” said, Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc joined with other national disability groups to express strong support for WIOA.  Congress last reauthorized the workforce investment programs under WIOA in 1998. Over the last few years, reauthorization of the Workforce Investment Act, including the vocational rehabilitation (VR) services under the Rehabilitation Act, has been a top priority for The Arc’s public policy agenda. The Arc advocated for many improvements to the system now incorporated under WIOA, consistent with its past and current position statements on Employment.

In general WIOA focuses vocational rehabilitation (VR) outcomes on competitive, integrated employment and promotes greater emphasis on transition services for youth with disabilities. WIOA also provides increased emphasis on coordination between VR and other agencies including school systems, extends the initial time period for VR supported employment services (from 18 to 24 months), and modifies eligibility determination to promote access to VR by people with the most significant disabilities.

The Arc Reacts to President’s Executive Order Raising Minimum Wage for Federal Contract Workers, Including People with Disabilities

This week, President Obama signed an executive order raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour for federal contract workers, including people with disabilities.  This order applies to new contracts beginning January 1, 2015, and will apply to replacements for expiring contracts as well as new agreements.

“The Arc is pleased that President Obama took this step for federal contract workers, including people with disabilities.  This wage boost is an important step forward and will benefit the lives of many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, helping them achieve their goals of greater financial independence.  We will be communicating with the Administration to ensure a smooth phase-in of this change and to encourage the Administration to put in place the infrastructure, safeguards, and supports for people who need more significant accommodations to succeed in the workplace,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc Applauds National Governors Association for Work to Promote Employing People with Disabilities

At the recent National Governors Association (NGA) meeting, outgoing NGA Chair Governor Jack Markell (DE) wrapped up his year-long Chair’s Initiative, “A Better Bottom Line: Employing People with Disabilities.” The initiative focused on the employment challenges that affect individuals with intellectual and other significant disabilities and the role that both state government and business can play in facilitating and advancing opportunities for employment.  At the NGA meeting, Governor Markell released a final Blueprint for Governors summarizing the initiative’s activities, findings, and recommendations.

“Governor Markell’s initiative has brought attention to an issue that is too often ignored in our society – what people with disabilities can do in the workplace.  People with disabilities, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are an integral part of our economy. The Arc is thrilled with Governor Markell’s leadership to raise the profile of this important issue to the governors across the country.  Chapters of The Arc, found in 700 communities across the country, are ready to support states that make employment for people with disabilities a priority,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.