The Arc Launches TalentScout – Guide for Employers on How to Successfully Employ People with Autism

TalentScoutWashington, DC – One in 68 children today are being diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).  The unemployment rate of adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including ASDs, is 85 percent.  This appalling statistic coupled with the increase in prevalence of kids being diagnosed demands action from all sectors of our economy to ensure that people with ASDs are finding appropriate employment at a fair wage, and retaining that job with the proper supports to be successful and have a career of their choosing, just like people without disabilities.
With nearly 65 years of experience working with and serving people with I/DD, including autism, The Arc is launching an exciting new resource called TalentScout for employers to unlock the talents of people with autism in the workplace.  TalentScout is a first of its kind resource toolkit that gives employers essential insight and tools that harnesses their employees with autism fullest potential and leads to higher levels of productivity in the workplace.

“People with autism have a lot to contribute in all aspects of our society.  In the workplace, their individual unique talents need to be maximized to benefit both the goals of their employer, and their personal desire to have and keep a job that adds meaning to their life.  Far too many people with autism are left on the sidelines of our workforce, and entities that have recognized the benefits of hiring someone with autism are reaping the rewards.  Whether it’s the loyalty that someone with a disability may bring to their employer, or their unique skill set that gets the job done, people with autism are ready for hire,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

TalentScout is a valuable resource for government agencies that are working to implement President Obama’s initiative (EO 13548) to hire 100,000 people with disabilities into the federal government workforce, and for federal government contractors who need to bring their companies in compliance with the new 503 regulations on employment of people with disabilities.  These new regulations require federal contractors to conduct targeted outreach to the disability community, establish a 7% workforce utilization goal; implement data collection mechanisms to measure effectiveness of affirmative action, provide invitation to applicants and existing employees to voluntarily self-identify, and to perform an annual evaluation to measure outcomes.

The Arc is providing a unique resource for employers in that TalentScout’s content has been vetted by people with autism, and it includes their first-hand accounts and insights as job applicants and employees. It is backed by the years of nationwide experience of The Arc’s vast chapter network, and by Autism Now: National Autism Resource and Information Center.

“TalentScout is an extremely valuable guide. This sets the bar high for employers,” Jose Velasco, SAP, Head, Autism at Work Program.

“The personal stories and insights took this document to another level,” Kristie King, Comcast/NBC Universal, Manager, Diversity Recruitment.

TalentScout is one component of TheArc@Work, which is leading the way in developing innovative workforce solutions for the government and private sector by connecting employers with talented employees with I/DD and supporting the recruitment, on-boarding, and retention process.

Building Vocational Success at The Arc of Carroll County

April is Autism Acceptance Month, and in honor of the launch of The Arc’s new initiative TalentScout, we at The Arc of Carroll County wanted to highlight some of the programs we are implementing to improve the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in the workforce.

 

Preparing for Success

The Arc of Carroll CountyFor the past 16 years, The Arc of Carroll County has had several educational partnerships to provide support to high school students and students in the Post-Secondary Program. One of these is VOICE, which teaches how to work with others, understanding the role of a job coach, and employer expectations. Another, TCP, focuses on the school-to-work transition and consists of locating job leads, filling out applications, interviewing, and being independent on the job.

Over the summer, we offer the Summer Youth Employment program for eligible high school and post-secondary participants. Through the program, participants have the opportunity to work in community businesses over the summer with the support of a job coach. This is paid employment, and plans are person-centered to identify unique supports for each person served.

A service we offer specifically for adults on the spectrum is Job Hunters. Coursework covers developing job skills, cover letter and resume writing, dressing for success, and other abilities. While the class itself is 10 weeks, it doesn’t end there! After the course is done, we continue to work with you until you become successfully employed. Last year, we successfully helped a student named Conner develop his skills and secure a job at the Westminster Home Goods for the holiday season. Now, Conner has made huge strides (all the way across the world!) and is residing in Japan looking for work teaching English to Japanese students.

 

Continued Support

The services don’t stop once someone has found employment. If specialized skills are required, we provide customized training to meet individualized employer needs. Program Coordinators and Employment specialists continue to work with individuals to liaise between the employee and employer to optimize vocational success.

Our Vocational Program, which follows a Place-Train-Maintain model, provides support, instruction, training, and supervision if necessary to maximize independence in the workplace. Some of the ways we do this are through job sampling, shadowing, and enclaves. One of the most unique parts of this program is Supported Enterprise, which assists individuals who are interested in starting their own small business through developing business plans and identifying funding sources. Our hope is that these participants may one day end up at Entrepreneur Alley during The Arc’s National Convention.

We believe that everyone has a right to meaningful and gainful employment, and that community services through The Arc’s chapters are a paramount tool in achieving this.

Federal Hiring of People with Disabilities Continues to Disappoint

Washington, DC – The federal government’s Office of Personnel Management (OPM) recently released Fiscal Year 2013 data on the hiring of people with disabilities in the government’s workforce. Once again, the report demonstrates that hiring of people with targeted disabilities, including intellectual disability (ID), continues to lag, and the federal government is missing an opportunity to be a model employer of people with disabilities.

“While the last few years have seen some modest increases in the numbers of people with disabilities employed by the federal government, The Arc remains deeply concerned that many people with the most significant disabilities, including jobseekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are being left behind. The federal government should implement the strategies the Department of Labor has laid out to meet their goal, and that should involve working with organizations like The Arc, with our nearly 700 chapters across the country, to proactively fill job openings with people with disabilities qualified for a variety of positions open in our government,” said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc.

The federal government, through the Department of Labor, has initiated a new effort to increase the number of people with disabilities employed by entities that contract with the government, asking contractors to aspire to a goal of 7 percent of their workforce with disabilities. In explaining why there is a need to step up hiring of people with disabilities, the Department of Labor has stated: “A substantial disparity in the employment rate of individuals with disabilities continues to persist despite years of technological advancements that have made it possible for people with disabilities to apply for and successfully perform a broad array of jobs.” Meanwhile, in Fiscal Year 2013, the federal government only hired 1,389 people with targeted disabilities, representing 1.32 percent of new hires overall. The category of targeted disabilities includes people with intellectual disability (ID).

One factor in the federal hiring picture is the congressionally mandated budget cuts known as sequestration. These cuts forced federal agencies to put in place furloughs, hiring freezes, and reduce overtime. These budget cuts have trickled down to impact hiring of all new employees, including people with disabilities. Several federal agencies, however, have used their Schedule A hiring authority to make hiring people with disabilities a priority. The Schedule A process is a non-competitive hiring method that provides people with disabilities a path to federal employment.

“The numbers demonstrate that successful employment for people with disabilities is doable with the Schedule A process. Agencies that haven’t used this tool in their toolbox should look to their peers for guidance on how to improve their outreach, in addition to utilizing the competitive process to reach people with disabilities that match the skill sets needed for job opportunities,” said Berns.

The agencies that have demonstrated willingness to hire via with Schedule A include the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of Labor, the Office of Personnel Management, and the Treasury Department. However, 14 agencies hired no people using this hiring authority in 2013, including the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Federal Trade Commission, and Department of Housing and Urban Development, which each made over 100 new hires but none through Schedule A.

One federal agency that The Arc has recently partnered with to boost the number of people with intellectual disability employed is the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). They have hired five individuals at GS3 and GS4 levels with the opportunity to be promoted to a GS5.

In July, The Arc submitted comments to the EEOC calling on the federal government to become a model employer of people with disabilities, including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

“While we are pleased that the EEOC is moving forward with strengthening federal regulations, the shockingly low rate of federal employment of people with intellectual disability persists. Agencies can act now to step up their efforts,” said Berns.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly reports that the percentage of working-age people with disabilities in the labor force is about one-third that of persons with no disability. On average, workers with disabilities face significant gaps in pay and compensation, compared to workers with no disability. Additionally, about one in three employment discrimination charges filed with the EEOC allege discrimination on the basis of disability (often, in combination with charges of other types of discrimination).

The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker. In 2010, The Arc conducted a national online survey, called the FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Over 5,000 people participated. Only 15 percent of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with an intellectual and/or developmental disability was employed.

The Arc Calls on the Federal Government to Hire More People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Washington, DC – Yesterday, The Arc submitted comments to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) calling on the federal government to become a model employer of people with disabilities, including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

“While the last few years have seen some modest increases in the numbers of people with disabilities employed by the federal government, The Arc remains deeply concerned that many people with the most significant disabilities, including jobseekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are being left behind,” said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc.

Data obtained by The Arc from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) reveal that in fiscal year 2012, the federal government employed only 813 non-seasonal, full time permanent employees with intellectual disability (ID), representing 0.044% of all federal employees.   Only 28 people, or 3/100ths of one-percent of total new hires, were people with ID.  That same year, the federal government employed only 118 part-time employees with ID.  Only 17 people with ID were hired as part-time employees, about 9/100ths of one-percent of new hires.

“While we are pleased that the EEOC is moving forward with strengthening federal regulations, the shockingly low rate of federal employment of people with intellectual disability is unacceptable. The Arc calls on the federal government to act immediately to remove barriers to employment for people with disabilities in the federal workforce, establish strong goals for hiring of people with disabilities, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and hold agencies accountable for meeting those goals.

“There is no need for OPM to wait for the EEOC to complete the rulemaking process before it takes action to address this problem.  OPM already has authority under existing law and under Executive Order 13548 to take action now,” Berns said.

Issued by President Obama on July 26, 2010, E.O. 13548, titled “Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities,” calls on the Federal Government to hire 100,000 people with disabilities over five years.

“As a first step, OPM should direct federal agencies to update and revise the “agency-specific plans for promoting employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities” required under the Executive Order so that they specifically address employment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. There are other steps that can be taken today.   The Federal Communications Commission has already embarked on an initiative to hire people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in that agency.  Other agencies should get started too.

“Across the United States, The Arc has nearly 700 state and local chapters in 49 states and DC that stand ready to assist the federal government in identifying people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are ready to work and whose abilities will be an asset to federal agencies. The federal government can and should be a model employer of people with disabilities. The Arc will continue to closely monitor annual reports on the federal employment of people with disabilities to ensure progress and accountability,” said Berns.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly reports that the percentage of working-age people with disabilities in the labor force is about one-third that of persons with no disability. On average, workers with disabilities face significant gaps in pay and compensation, compared to workers with no disability. Additionally, about one in three employment discrimination charges filed with the EEOC allege discrimination on the basis of disability (often, in combination with charges of other types of discrimination).

The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker. In 2010, The Arc conducted a national online survey, called the FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Over 5,000 people participated. Only 15% of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with an intellectual and/or developmental disability was employed.

The Arc Applauds Passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

The Arc released the following statement applauding the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).  WIOA is a bipartisan, bicameral compromise between the SKILLS Act (H.R. 803), which passed the House of Representatives in March of 2013, and the Workforce Investment Act of 2013 (S. 1356), which passed the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee in July of 2013. The proposal was developed by Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA), Representative John Kline (R-MN), Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Representative George Miller (D-CA), Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), Representative Virginia Foxx (R-NC), Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA), and Representative Rubén Hinojosa (D-TX).

“Everyone should have the opportunity to earn a competitive salary while contributing to their community, which is why we are thrilled with the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. The Arc applauds the bill’s focus on integrated, competitive employment for individuals with disabilities, and on essential transition services for youth with disabilities who need them to attain and hold a job. We are grateful to the Members of Congress who developed and supported this important legislation and stood up for individuals with disabilities who want to work, but need additional supports to reach their career goals,” said, Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc joined with other national disability groups to express strong support for WIOA.  Congress last reauthorized the workforce investment programs under WIOA in 1998. Over the last few years, reauthorization of the Workforce Investment Act, including the vocational rehabilitation (VR) services under the Rehabilitation Act, has been a top priority for The Arc’s public policy agenda. The Arc advocated for many improvements to the system now incorporated under WIOA, consistent with its past and current position statements on Employment.

In general WIOA focuses vocational rehabilitation (VR) outcomes on competitive, integrated employment and promotes greater emphasis on transition services for youth with disabilities. WIOA also provides increased emphasis on coordination between VR and other agencies including school systems, extends the initial time period for VR supported employment services (from 18 to 24 months), and modifies eligibility determination to promote access to VR by people with the most significant disabilities.

The Arc Reacts to President’s Executive Order Raising Minimum Wage for Federal Contract Workers, Including People with Disabilities

This week, President Obama signed an executive order raising the minimum wage to $10.10 an hour for federal contract workers, including people with disabilities.  This order applies to new contracts beginning January 1, 2015, and will apply to replacements for expiring contracts as well as new agreements.

“The Arc is pleased that President Obama took this step for federal contract workers, including people with disabilities.  This wage boost is an important step forward and will benefit the lives of many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, helping them achieve their goals of greater financial independence.  We will be communicating with the Administration to ensure a smooth phase-in of this change and to encourage the Administration to put in place the infrastructure, safeguards, and supports for people who need more significant accommodations to succeed in the workplace,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc Applauds National Governors Association for Work to Promote Employing People with Disabilities

At the recent National Governors Association (NGA) meeting, outgoing NGA Chair Governor Jack Markell (DE) wrapped up his year-long Chair’s Initiative, “A Better Bottom Line: Employing People with Disabilities.” The initiative focused on the employment challenges that affect individuals with intellectual and other significant disabilities and the role that both state government and business can play in facilitating and advancing opportunities for employment.  At the NGA meeting, Governor Markell released a final Blueprint for Governors summarizing the initiative’s activities, findings, and recommendations.

“Governor Markell’s initiative has brought attention to an issue that is too often ignored in our society – what people with disabilities can do in the workplace.  People with disabilities, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are an integral part of our economy. The Arc is thrilled with Governor Markell’s leadership to raise the profile of this important issue to the governors across the country.  Chapters of The Arc, found in 700 communities across the country, are ready to support states that make employment for people with disabilities a priority,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc Reacts to Historic Verdict on Behalf of Workers with Intellectual Disabilities

Washington, DC – Earlier this week a Davenport, Iowa jury awarded damages totaling $240 million to 32 men with intellectual and developmental disabilities who worked for Henry’s Turkey Service in Atalissa for decades.  It was the largest verdict in the history of the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), which filed the case, for disability discrimination and unlawful harassment.  Just one day after hearing closing arguments, the jury agreed with the EEOC that Henry’s Turkey Service subjected the men to severe harassment and discrimination that warranted punitive and compensatory damages for each man.

“While this verdict is a victory for the workers who can feel triumph knowing that the abuse they faced did not go unpunished, it’s also a harsh reminder to the disability movement that we must continue to be vigilant in this modern era of progressive employment practices to guard against these kinds of atrocities.  The abuse of these men didn’t end decades ago – it was still going on as recently as 2009, and that is unacceptable.  I applaud the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for their pursuit of justice for people with disabilities in the workplace and urge them to continue this important work. Individuals with disabilities have the right to work in a safe work environment free of exploitation, and this verdict sends a message that this kind of abuse will not be tolerated,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

Last year, EEOC claimed that Henry’s Turkey Service violated the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) by paying 32 workers with intellectual disabilities severely substandard wages.  The company denied the workers their full wages by claiming a “credit” for substandard living conditions.  In September 2012, a district court judge ordered the company to pay its former employees a total of $1.3 million for jobs they performed at a turkey processing plant in West Liberty, Iowa between 2007 and 2009 for about 41 cents an hour.  Combining last year’s ruling and this week’s verdict, the total judgment in this case is $241.3 million.

How The Arc – Los Angeles & Orange Counties Helps Employ People with Disabilities

By Kevin P. MacDonald, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc – Los Angeles & Orange Counties

An employee at The Arc Los Angeles and Orange Counties new dollar store in the City of Long Beach, called Just-A-Buck, helps a customer check out.

It is an exciting time in Southern California for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD)!  On July 20, we celebrated the opening of a franchise to further our mission of employing people with I/DD. With an unemployment rate of 85% for people with developmental disabilities and state funding at a standstill for years – we decided to find a creative way to employ people with disabilities in our community.

Partnering with a New York based franchise called “Just-A-Buck” and with the assistance of a local benefactor we were able to make this dream come true.

The store employs 5 people with I/DD, each of them earning a salary at or above minimum wage, working alongside employees without disabilities. The employees participate in all aspects of making the store a success.  The new store will also provide an added bonus: to have people come into the store and see our workers and what they are capable of instead of their disability, you just can’t measure that! We believe that work gives everyone, especially those with disabilities, purpose and dignity and it helps them achieve independence and economic self-sufficiency.

To learn more about the store visit our website: www.thearclaoc.org. Also, if you live in the Los Angeles area stop by and visit us: 141 E. Willow Street in Long Beach at the Wrigley Shopping Center (Willow & Long Beach Boulevard).

The Arc Commends Governor Jack Markell’s New Initiative to Employ Individuals with Disabilities

Washington, DC – This week, Delaware Governor Jack Markell was named Chair of the National Governors Association (NGA). Shortly after his appointment became official, the Governor announced that during his year-long term, his Chair’s initiative will be increasing employment among individuals with disabilities. The Arc fully supports Governor Markell’s efforts and applauds him for his work on behalf of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and other disabilities.

“Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are capable of excelling in the workforce and giving back to the communities in which they live. We commend Governor Markell for bringing national attention to the employment challenges facing individuals with disabilities and for working to create employment opportunities for them through innovative public-private partnerships.  The Arc has long recognized the need for employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities, and we look forward to supporting the Governor’s initiative,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

A major emphasis of the Governor’s initiative will be on people who have significant intellectual and developmental disabilities and may require supports like job coaches and personal attendants in order to live and work in the community. Throughout the year he will convene governors, businesses, disability leaders, and other thought leaders. The initiative will focus on educating public and private sector employers and supporting state governments to join with business partners to develop and build out blueprints to promote the hiring and retention of people with disabilities.

The Department of Labor released statistics in 2011 stating that 17.8 percent of Americans with a disability are employed, compared to 63.6 percent of those with no disability.  The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker.  In 2010, The Arc conducted and received over 5,000 responses to a national online survey called the Family and Individual Needs for Disability Supports, or FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Only 15% of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with I/DD was employed.

“The bottom line is that there are so many people with disabilities who have the time, talent and desire to make meaningful contributions to interested employers,” Governor Markell said. “More companies are recognizing that creating greater economic opportunity for these workers improves their own bottom line as well. It doesn’t matter whether you were born with additional challenges to face or – in the case of our wounded veterans for example – acquired them later in life. What matters is what you have to offer.”