Autism NOW’s Co-Director Receives National Honor

Amy GoodmanEarlier this month, Amy Goodman, Co-Director of the Autism NOW Center, received the Outstanding Advocate of the Year award from The Autism Society of America. This comes as no surprise to The Arc’s national staff who work with Amy on a daily basis. Her passion for what she does is present in every task she undertakes.  The Autism NOW Center wouldn’t be the success it is without Amy’s dedication. You can view Amy at work answering questions in The Autism NOW Answer Series.

Read in Amy’s own words why winning this award is so important to her:

This award means a lot to me because it is proof that all my hard work and dedication to my profession has paid off and that individuals do appreciate me. It stands as a testament that what I do makes a difference in the lives of individuals with autism. I am so lucky to be able to share my life with those in need and I feel proud to be able to say I’m an individual with autism who has paved the way for others to enjoy life to the fullest extent.

This award is not only for me personally but to be shared with all my colleagues at The Arc, my friends and colleagues at The Autism Society of America, Robert Hunter of The Grateful Dead for enabling my brother to make a connection with Kent Moreno, who told us about Asperger’s syndrome in the first place, and all my friends and colleagues at Marshall University and the College Support program because if it were not for all their support and encouragement I would not be where I am today. I owe it all to them.

I may not move mountains by myself, but I can advocate and give others a voice they may not know they even have. This award has validated my life for me and I now know I am where I need to be and that I will survive in this world. It has given me a sense of self-worth and the confidence to know I can achieve or accomplish things above and beyond what others said I would never do.

Talking About Inclusive Education

Inclusive Class podcastAmy Goodman, Co-Director of the Autism NOW National Autism Resource and Information Center, will join The Inclusive Class Podcast on Friday, May 17 at 9:00 a.m. EST for a 30-minute chat about inclusive education for students with autism and other developmental disabilities.

The Inclusive Class is hosted by Nicole Eredics, founder of the online resource, The Inclusive Class and Terri Mauro, author of 50 Ways to Support Your Child’s Special Education and The Everything Parent’s Guide to Sensory Integration Disorder.  Nicole is an elementary educator who has spent over 15 years teaching in an inclusive classroom setting creating and discovering solutions for integrating students with special needs in the classroom.  Terri Mauro is one of the most recognized experts on special education and special needs parenting on the Internet.

Tune in for Amy’s unique perspective as a person who identifies as being on the autism spectrum on Blog Talk Radio on May 17. Also, you can access the podcast after it airs on Blog Talk Radio, on iTunes and on The Inclusive Class website.

Autism NOW is a project of The Arc funded in part by the Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and was created to provide quality, vetted information and resources for individuals on the autism spectrum and with other developmental disabilities.

My Definition of Autism

Amy GoodmanApril is Autism Awareness Month and The Arc and Autism NOW are taking this opportunity to ask individuals who identify as being on the autism spectrum to answer this question: “What is your definition of autism?” Amy Goodman is co-director of Autism NOW and an individual on the spectrum. Below is her personal definition of autism. Follow the conversation this month online using #autismaware.

By Amy Goodman

Being an individual on the autism spectrum means that I have a diagnosis of autism.  So what. It doesn’t matter in the long run because it does not define who I am or what I can or cannot do.  First and foremost, I am Amy, an individual who happens to have a diagnosis of autism. I don’t let it get in my way of anything. It does not present any challenges for me and if it does, I work to overcome those challenges by finding a way to jump through the hurdle and succeed at everything I do or try.

For me, it has been a positive experience finding out that I was on the spectrum. I have embraced it and used it to my advantage. It opened a lot of doors that otherwise would have stayed closed. I was able to move forward with my life when I found out. I went to Graduate school and chose the path that was best for me. It helped me to focus on what I wanted to do with my life.

Knowing I was on the spectrum, and knowing that I could be a success has helped me to jump the biggest hurdle of all, obtaining and keeping a job in the autism field. The opportunities have been endless and by embracing my autism, I have grown as an adult. I finally found what I had been looking for more than 30 years – an answer to what direction I should go, and where I fit in in this world.

Explaining to someone not on the spectrum is very difficult. They just don’t seem to understand why I do what I do. They are always being pessimistic and saying that there is nothing wrong with me, which in this case is true. There is nothing wrong with me. It’s the attitude of others that only see the glass as half empty and that I’m not capable of doing anything at all. That is something that needs to be fixed. Me? I’m the optimist. Don’t fix what isn’t broken. Fine tune it. If someone is on the spectrum, utilize their abilities and accommodate their needs, don’t question them. Work with them to maximize their brain capacity. See the situation through their eyes. Give them a chance to excel and most of all treat them with respect and dignity.

We may not be the most social of beings, but we certainly can learn and grow from our mistakes. Just remember there is more than one way to skin a cat, so explaining what it’s like living with autism is different for everyone on the spectrum. I don’t need to explain anything because I’m perfect the way I am. If I don’t like something I avoid it. If it hurts my ears, I wear earplugs or noise canceling headphones. There is a solution for every problem, one just has to do what is best for them and not worry about what others think.

Autism is part of me, so it should not define me or need explaining at all. Not everyone can pass as “normal” or “neurotypical” but who wants to be like them anyway?  I am who I am and there is no changing me. Accept me for who I am and you will see autism in a whole new light.

Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month Q&A with Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman

This month, The Arc’s blog will feature a Q & A with members of The Arc’s national office staff to help raise awareness of issues important to the I/DD community during Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month. Amy Goodman is the co-director of the Autism Now National Resource and Information Center and is on the autism spectrum.

Q. Amy, as a person who is on the autism spectrum, help us raise some awareness during Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month. Are there any myths or popular misconceptions about autism that you would like to help dispel?

“Individuals on the autism spectrum can work, should work and make some of the best employees.”

A. Yes, it’s a myth that individuals with autism or Asperger’s syndrome cannot work because of their disability. Not true. Individuals on the autism spectrum can work, should work and make some of the best employees. An individual just needs to find an environment that is accepting of disabilities, a supervisor that has some experience working with individuals on the spectrum, and a boss who understands their unique characteristics and how they can fit in to help make others aware of what it is like to live with a disability. If more people would take the time to see the individual for who they are and what they can do and not focus on the disability maybe more individuals with autism or Asperger’s would be employed, which might solve the problem of having too many individuals on SSI. Or maybe not, but it’s a start.