Recent Posts

Impact of Poor Vision

Screen Shot 2015-08-18 at 1.07.02 PMVision is very important to maintaining the quality of an individual’s life. Individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) are more at risk for having issues associated with vision than the general population. Research has shown that individuals with ID are less inclined to to go to routine physician visits for check-ups. The same applies for receiving their biennial eye check-up. Individuals who are at risk or have a history of poor vision in their family should go more frequently for check-ups. Some factors that can affect vision—putting an individual at risk—are: diabetes, high blood pressure, specific medications with side effects to vision, or previous injuries to the eye. Obesity, which often leads to diabetes and high blood pressure, is already a very prominent issue among individuals with ID, putting them in a potential at-risk category.

Individuals who are non-verbal might not to be able to express to their family or caregiver that their vision has changed and that they may now require corrective lenses, which is why it’s so important to continually get check-ups. Individuals may also be used to having poor eyesight and not know that their vision can be corrected to see clearer. So, it’s important to continually go back to the doctor for check-ups to ensure their vision is still accurate. Physicians should have adaptive eye charts that include pictures, shapes, or a rotating “E” (individuals can point to which side the opening is on the E) instead of letters if the individual is not literate or non-verbal.

Correcting poor vision will help individuals to be more independent. They might feel more comfortable going places or doing things on their own where they can now clearly see signs, directions, and other markers around them. It will also help with balance to have a clear view of the floor and things around them, and with depth perception to reduce falls. Being able to see others clearly could even improve their social skills by allowing them to identify people better and feel more comfortable being in social settings around others.

Ensure that individuals you care for receive an eye exam every 2 years. If glasses are required, there are organizations, such as the Lion Club, which help to recycle old prescription eyeglasses and give them out to those that can’t afford them. To learn more about the health of individuals with ID, check out The Arc’s HealthMeet project website.

  1. Happy 80th Birthday Social Security!
  2. SSDI: Sustaining Our Lifeline for Decades to Come!
  3. Happy Birthday to Two Essential Lifelines!
  4. Social Security – Attack Averted on Social Security, SSDI, and SSI in Senate Highway Bill
  5. Social Security – One Social Security Act Introduced
  6. Social Security – 2015 Trustees Report Released
  7. Rights – White House and Federal Agencies Host Official ADA Commemoration Events
  8. Family Support – Bills Introduced in Senate and House to Support Caregivers
  9. Family Support – Senate Passes Older Americans Act, Expanding Eligibility for National Family Caregiver Support Program