HealthMeet: Top 5 exercises for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities

Guest post by Jared Ciner, Certified Personal Trainer, Disabilities Support Counselor
Founder/Director of SPIRIT Fit & Health

As you may already know, an extremely high percentage of people in America are suffering from obesity. What you may not know is that people with developmental and other disabilities are 58% more likely to be obese than the general population, and they make up roughly 20% of our country’s citizens. As a society, it is our duty to provide the necessary resources and support that enable people with disabilities to be healthy. The purpose of this article is to begin enabling people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to take control of their lives through the practice of health-promoting exercises that are safe, effective and tailored specifically towards their needs.

As a certified personal trainer, I believe that partaking in proper exercise and physical activities empowers us as human beings, and allows us to reach our mental, emotional and physical potential. As a support counselor, I know that people with I/DD often require adapted strategies in order to accomplish certain functional goals. In April of 2013, I teamed up with Sam Smith, certified personal trainer and proud young man with Asperger’s syndrome, to design and implement group health & fitness programs for teens and adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities. Below are five exercises that we encourage all people, including those with an I/DD, to practice in order to maximize their strength, health and independence. Each exercise focuses in improving stability, strength and cardiovascular endurance. (The information below is presented as images. Access a readable file here.)

#1: Plank:

Plank

#2: High Knees:

HealthMeet - High Knees

#3: Arm Circles:

HealthMeet - Arm Circles

#4: Single-Leg Balance:

HealthMeet - Single Leg Balance

#5: Squats:

HealthMeet - Squats

A Mother’s Open–Letter to The Arc About Wings for Autism

Dear Sarah,

I am writing to express my continued gratitude for the Wings For Autism event held in Anchorage, Alaska.

Jack and his cat

Jack and his cat

Our 11 year old son Jack experiences high functioning autism, which he was diagnosed with at four years of age.  While Jack did fly at ages 5 months and 9 months respectively, in his memory he has never been on an airplane, which raised concerns for us, since we have scheduled air-travel this summer.

The Wings for Autism experience was far beyond any of our expectations (our family of 4 attended).  The attention to detail, real life/real time airport experience of obtaining tickets, line waiting, Transportation Security Administration (TSA), airport exploring, more waiting at the gate; it was all so needed, and so appreciated.  The time on the aircraft was more than we could have ever hoped for, between the taxiing and “cruising altitude” beverage/snack service, the crew going through their regular motions/speeches and the pilots coaching us through the sounds and motions of the aircraft… truly exemplary.  To add to this, the generosity of all of the hands at play, from the folks getting us through the lines, to the TSA, to the airport staff, to ground crew, to the flight staff and of course the pilots, The Arc of Anchorage, Ted Stevens International Airport for handling the logistics and security of a “mock” boarding and flight on their active airstrip, not to mention all of the volunteers and hours/dollars funneled into this event is staggering and to know that this was all done for our kids, our families to have a better experience, well, it is so humbling and overwhelming to me it makes me want to cry.

Thank you.

As for our Jack, he struggled.  And it couldn’t have been a better place, better environment, FOR him to struggle.  It gave me a good glimpse of what I might see and might expect this summer.  Jack did very well for about the first 1 1/2 hour (noon to 1:30), and then he started to lose his patience.  The noises (especially from children), the waiting, the MORE waiting, it set him right to the edge.  (It is worth noting that there are interventions I could have used/will use in the future, but I wanted him to have a “rougher” experience for this practice run so I could really have an accurate view of where I needed to focus for our trip this summer; also, I knew this was the time for him to have it harder, rather than the “real” time.)  When we boarded the aircraft and sat down in his window seat, he began to emotionally shut down.  He started to have what can best be described as a panic attack, breathing fast and clenching his hands, and said he “didn’t like this anymore” and “wanted to get off/leave”.  I told him we could shut the shade on the window, which we did, and I just quietly talked him through it (I figured he would want the window, but next time maybe I’ll seat him elsewhere).  I told him that the best thing we could do was to sit in the uncomfortableness and be uncomfortable, and eventually the anxiety feeling would start to come down.  I reminded him that if we “ran away” from this moment it would only be much worse the next time (I personally have diagnosed Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, and this is true for me; I try and use this approach with Jack as well), and I knew he didn’t want to miss out on travel and experiencing new places like other people.

Jack eventually pulled the shade back up, and about 20 minutes into it, he calmed a bit and smiled, and said he felt better.  He kept wanting reassurance over and over that we weren’t going to take off.  He is terrified of motion sickness and throwing up, and he kept talking to himself about how he’d be okay, and how he probably wouldn’t throw up on the real trip this summer.  He checked out the bathroom as well.  While he never fully relaxed, all in all it went very well.  When it was all said and done, he claimed it was “awesome” and said on a scale of 1-10, it was a 10 :).

Jack still has worries about taking off/landing, and getting sick on the plane.  We will cross those hurdles as they come.  Yet, this experience with Wings For Autism gave us something we normally could never obtain, which was practice in an airport and on a real aircraft.  Who gets to have that?!!  I don’t think I can fully punctuate how important and valuable this experience was to our family and to Jack; all I can say is thank you, and hope it is a program that can be repeated so more families can benefit like we did.

Jack and his brother

Jack and his brother

One thing that all parents keep in their proverbial back pocket, ESPECIALLY families with special needs children, is the ability to leave/exit a situation if needed.  If the event is too stimulating, your child is having a meltdown, the event is too long, there is too much noise, etc., YOU CAN LEAVE.  It is a safety net, and benefits not only your child, but it is also executed in consideration for the people around you.  A plane is probably the ONLY environment in which you CANNOT leave.  You can’t even really move away.  Knowing this certainty can be figuratively paralyzing for the parents; what are you going to do if things go poorly?  All you can do is the best you can, but that one ace-in-the-hole of leaving the situation is off the table.  It is enough to keep some of us from wanting to knowingly put ourselves and our kids in that potential situation.   That is the way it has been for us.  I would be remiss if I did not admit my own anxiety about air travel this summer, but I know it is something we must rise to and experience, and I will do everything I can to support it going as smoothly as possible for both Jack and for those around us.  It is a tall order.  Thanks to Wings For Autism, it is now more attainable.

Special needs, and all the trimmings that come with it, can be difficult, even impossible, to understand.  The good thing is, people don’t need to understand.  On an empirical level, it is too much to even ask.  To raise my expectations and hope for someone else to understand what our life is like, what Jack’s life is like, might be asking something that person cannot give.  However, everyone is capable of giving compassion.  Compassion does not have to in concert with “getting it”; compassion can stand alone.  And when a parent like me or even Jack himself receives a knowing look of compassion, a gesture in kind, a gentle word or nod, an extension of patience, it is such a gift.  That is the empathy that nourishes and gets us through that moment, that hour, that day, or that week.  It satiates in a way that even I cannot express, and it keeps me going.  It keeps Jack going.  And for this, I will always remain truly grateful.

For this opportunity, we remain in your debt.

Warmest Regards,

Katherine

Healthy Eating Tips to Help Fight Obesity

Obesity is one of the largest problems facing adults living in the United States. Statistics show that one-third of Americans is considered obese.  Thirty-six percent of individuals with disabilities are considered obese as compared to 23% of individuals without disabilities. The best way to fight obesity is by eating healthy and staying active. Unfortunately, for individuals with disabilities there can be physical limitations as to what they can do in regards to physical activity.  While most activities can be modified to fit the person’s individual fitness needs, this still puts a greater importance on the necessity to eat healthier. Poor nutrition, which can lead to obesity, can also be a catalyst for many other health related issues too like high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, and fatigue.

There are many reasons as to why individuals with disabilities may not eat as healthy as they should – lack of nutritional awareness, limited income, trouble cooking themselves, difficulty chewing or swallowing specific foods, or sensitivity to certain tastes or foods. If a caregiver cooks meals for them, the individual may have limited input as to what types of foods are prepared. Ensuring that the individual has a say in their meal choices and making a few key changes can help tremendously when it comes to healthy eating. A simple change such as drinking more water instead of sugary beverages throughout the day will help keep you hydrated, feeling fuller with no calories, and generally doesn’t cost a thing.

Teaching individuals with disabilities how to save money while at the grocery store will help them pocket some extra cash for other activities or allow them to buy more food.  Simple tips such as, using coupons, buying store brand or generic brand versus name brand items, looking for daily specials, and paying attention to expiration dates will help stretch those food dollars.  Fresh fruits that are in season usually won’t go bad as quickly and are more cost efficient. Instead of buying yellow bananas that are already ripe (and can go bad quickly) try buying them when they are a little green so that they will last longer. Once bananas ripen, freeze them to make banana bread!  Individuals with disabilities who also have mobility issues might have trouble cutting up foods such as, vegetables and fruits. Specially adapted utensils can make this process easier and safer. You can also try purchasing frozen or canned fruits and veggies instead (choose fruit that is canned in 100% fruit juice and vegetables that have “no salt of sodium added” for best options). They will last longer, are already cut up, and are usually a little cheaper.  Nutritionists have also shown that there is little difference between the nutrients you receive from fresh and frozen veggies, so go ahead and grab the frozen ones!  Large supermarkets and buying in bulk will usually have cheaper prices as opposed to local or specialty shops too.

Planning out weekly meals will also help to know what foods to buy in the grocery store to ensure that individuals are eating healthy every day. When working with the individual with a disability to plan out meals for the week make sure to keep it simple. Recipes that are too difficult or take too long to prepare can be discouraging and may make them not enjoy cooking and avoid it. Recipes should have no more than 5 or 6 ingredients. A good rule of thumb when helping individuals make their meal choices is to make sure that 3 of the 5 food groups are present in each plate. This will help to allow for the individual to choose foods they like, but still keep a balanced plate. Making a larger recipe that can be frozen and eaten again later in the week is also a good idea to have for nights when there is little time to cook instead of running out to a fast food restaurant. Cookbooks for individuals with disabilities, like Cooking By Color, help to clearly illustrate what ingredients are needed and how to prepare simple, yet healthy, meals in smaller portions. To learn more about Cooking By Color’s concept and planning for successful eating, check out author Joan Guthrie Medlen’s, HealthMeet webinar.

Many resources are out there to help teach the importance of keeping a balanced diet. Choosemyplate.gov and the CDC’s new Healthy Weight Issue Briefs provide information on obesity and maintaining a healthier diet. The Arc’s HealthMeet page contains resources and webinars regarding more healthy eating tips and links for further information.

Tobacco Cessation Leads to a Healthier Heart

The heart is one of the hardest working muscles in the body, as well as the most important, which is why it’s essential to take good care of it.  Cardiovascular disease is the number one cause of death of both women and men in the United States and is the leading cause of disability.

While there are many factors that increase your risk of having cardiovascular disease that you cannot change about yourself – genetics, sex, race, ethnicity, family history, etc. – many deaths from cardiovascular diseases (heart attacks, strokes, and heart disease) can be prevented through healthier habits. Making a few key changes can prolong your life by many years!  One large issue that can be easily controlled to help reduce your risk is abstaining from tobacco use. According to the CDC 25% of adults with ID smoke as opposed to 17% for adults without disabilities.

Smoking is the leading cause of preventable deaths in the US.  Smoking tobacco allows for a build-up of plaque and other deposits to gather in the arteries (and lungs), thus blocking part of the artery and slowing the flow of blood to the heart.  The heart then has to work harder to push blood through the narrower clogged arteries to the rest of body, which leads to high blood pressure.  When the plaque builds up to become a full blockage in an artery is when a heart attack, stroke, or blood clot elsewhere in the body occurs and can be deadly.

Quitting smoking can be difficult for the general population; however when a person with an intellectual disability starts smoking tobacco quitting can be especially difficult.  There are fewer programs and resources tailored for individuals with ID that explain the full risks, so they may not understand the importance behind quitting and the range of effects it can have on their bodies.  Individuals with ID can also have a harder time controlling nicotine urges.  This can cause outbreaks of bad behaviors towards the caregiver, family member, etc. who is trying to help them to quit.  Sometimes cigarettes have even been used as a reward with an individual with ID to help reinforce another good behavior, which can lead to more confusion about why smoking is harmful.

Although resources are scarce, there are good tobacco cessation programs out there to help individuals with ID to quit.  I Can Quit was developed by Monish University in Australia to help facilitate tobacco cessation sessions with the use of their guidebook and the Michigan Department of Community Health has also worked to create tobacco cessation resources for individuals with disabilities.  Learn more about their resources and the effects of tobacco through The Arc’s HealthMeet webinar on tobacco cessation.

Although quitting can be difficult for individuals with ID, starting to smoke hopefully won’t even be considered if the correct information is communicated early on. However, it’s never too late to quit – your heart, arteries and lungs will begin to repair themselves almost immediately after you stop. It only takes about 20 minutes after your last cigarette for your heart rate to start to decrease back to a normal level.  Teaching individuals these facts and leading by example will give them the knowledge to know the harmful effects that smoking can have before they begin – which is invaluable to their heart and overall health.

Seizure Treatment for Individuals with IDD

It’s not shocking news to hear that individuals with disabilities have more health issues than the general population.  Unfortunately, individuals with intellectual disabilities also have an increased risk of developing epilepsy.  According to the Epilepsy Foundation Metropolitan New York about 30% of children with epilepsy have another developmental disability, and the risk of children with developmental disabilities below the age of 5 years old having a seizure is 4 times higher than other children at that age.  As adults 10-20% of individuals with IDD also have epilepsy and for those individuals with and IDD and cerebral palsy it increases to 50%.  The reasoning behind this is uncertain, but it could be a because of the underlying neurodevelopmental condition that is already in existence.

There are many different treatments available to help control or reduce seizure activity within the body.  The majority of people with epilepsy take daily medications to try to control activity.  For individuals with disabilities it’s just one more mediation to be added with more adverse side effects and behavioral changes.   The side effects of these medications can also be difficult to determine with non-verbal patients.  Behaviors and mood changes might be mistakenly linked to the disability instead of the seizure mediation or they can go unnoticed by staff/caregivers.

Other forms of therapy are the vagus nerve stimulation and a Ketogenic diet.  The Ketogenic diet is a medically prescribed strict diet individuals can go on that is high in fat and low in carbohydrates and proteins. It is not completely certain how and if this diet will work (can vary by person), but it creates a metabolic change that can alter brain chemistry and limit frequency of seizures.  The stricter you follow this diet the more effective it is said to be. This diet can be a struggle for individuals with IDD that may already have other food issues present – strong dislike of smells, tastes, etc. The vagus nerve stimulator (VNS) is a small device implanted into the shoulder area that sends electrical impulses up the vagus nerve in the neck to stimulate the brain at set intervals. These impulses help to regulate the electrical activity in the brain that causes seizures.  The VNS can also be paired with a magnetic device that can turn it on when an individual feels a seizure coming by holding it up to the chest area where the VNS is implanted.

The best way to try to control seizures is to be aware of all the facts surrounding them – times of day they occur, how long they last, frequency per day, possible triggers (missed medication, overtired, dehydrated, alcohol use) and any feelings/effects afterwards. The more information you can present to your physician the better they will be able to understand the big picture of what’s happening and provide better care for the individual.  Websites such as, SeizureTracker.com  help to record all this information  in one secure place, so you can easily document the most detailed information  possible.  Learn more about SeizureTracker.com through our webinar with the site’s co-founder, Rob Moss.

For more information on seizure treatments and evaluation, check out Seth Keller’s HealthMeet webinar.

Diagnosing Dementia in People with I/DD Difficult

HealthMeetStudies have shown that individuals with intellectual disabilities are living longer these days with many living well into their 50’s and 60’s and beyond.  This is most likely due to new medical advances and educational programs that help empower individuals to live healthier lifestyles.  While this is remarkable news, it is also directly correlated to the increased rate of dementia in individuals with I/DD.  While most of the general population develops Alzheimer’s after the age of 65, many individuals with I/DD (especially Down syndrome) are more likely to develop Alzheimer’s earlier on in life, which is called Early-Onset Alzheimer’s.  Some may even develop it as early as their forties.

Individuals with Down syndrome are at a higher risk than other individuals with disabilities for developing dementia.  As we know, individuals with Down syndrome have an extra copy of the chromosome 21.  This specific chromosome contains a gene that produces a protein that can cause brain cell damage.  Since these individuals have an extra copy of this gene they are producing more of this harmful protein in their bodies.  Studies have shown that almost all individuals with Down syndrome will develop the same changes in the brain that are associated with dementia; however not everyone will develop the symptoms of the disease.

Diagnosing dementia in an individual with I/DD can also be a difficult situation because many individuals may have trouble answering the testing questions that could be used to diagnose it. There are also few other assessment tools developed for individuals with I/DD.  In addition, some behavioral issues that individuals with I/DD can have may also be confused with signs for dementia when the issue is rooted in another problem. Starting to rule out all other possible options for the change in the individual’s behavior is a good start to determine what the real concern is.

We recently talked to The Arc’s Board President, Nancy Webster, who has had some personal connections with dementia in her family, too.  Nancy’s concern is that families don’t know where to turn to get information on dementia, what signs to look for, and how to get the appropriate testing.  As caregivers and family members with an individual with a disability, it is important to be aware of the individual’s whole situation to better advocate for their needs.  Nancy believes “this advocacy is not solely on The Arc and its members, and on families, but also on general practitioners too – as they are the first line of people who tend to see our population”.  Nancy’s hope is that through The Arc’s HealthMeet project, The Arc will become a resource for this topic to help families and caregivers find the information and supports that they need to better treat this disease, and once diagnosed learn how to cope and minimize the effects of dementia as best possible.

For more resources and webinars relating to dementia, check out the resources and archived webinar page on The Arc’s HealthMeet site.  Don’t forget to sign up for our upcoming webinar focusing on Understanding Behavioral Changes in Adults with IDD and Dementia.

Men, Get Proactive About Your Health

Women’s health issues are highly publicized. There are information, brochures and events relating to breast cancer awareness all over the country. However, you never hear as much information regarding men’s health issues. This is not to say that men’s issues are less important because they definitely are not.  Many studies have shown that men are less likely to go to doctor’s visits or follow up on concerns they are having in their bodies. More concerning is adding that to the fact that we have also learned that individuals with disabilities in general go to the doctor less than individuals without disabilities. Therefore, men with disabilities are at even more of a risk for not receiving the necessary preventative check-ups and screenings needed.

Statistics say that 1 in 6 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their life. Prostate cancer is the 2nd leading cause of cancer death in men (behind lung cancer). However, it is also very curable. In fact, most men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer will not die from it if it is caught early on. The key is catching it early on. It takes about a minute to receive a prostate exam and doing this annually could be help detect abnormalities while they are still treatable.

Just like prostate cancer, testicular cancer is also very treatable if diagnosed early too. Information has been accumulating from recent studies that show an association between Down Syndrome and testicular germ cell tumors. As other malformations can occur in organs of individuals with Down Syndrome, the testicles can also develop abnormally, which can produce conditions that are conducive to creating germ cell tumor growth.

Educating self-advocates and their caregivers with information like this will help to increase awareness and raise rates of early detection for cancer in men. Help ensure the men that you care for receive the proper information and receive annual cancer screenings. A few minutes a year to get screened could make a huge difference. For more information relating to men’s health, check out the CDC’s Men’s Health page.

Breast Cancer Doesn’t Discriminate!

Breast cancer is second leading cause of cancer deaths among women.  However, if found early breast cancer is also one of the most treatable cancers.  These statics relate to ALL women, whether you have a disability or not, which is why it is so disconcerting that studies have shown that women with disabilities are much less likely to receive regular mammograms.  Receiving routine check-ups and screenings are essential to finding these types of cancers early on when they are treatable.  It is recommended that women over the age of 40 receive a mammogram every year.  If you are a woman below the age of 40, but have a history of breast cancer in your family it is also advised that you start getting screened earlier.

There are no proven reasons as to why women with disabilities have less frequent screenings, but many times we are so focused on “treating the disability” that annual check-ups and appointments to screen for common diseases and conditions can get pushed to the side as less of a priority. Also, sometimes medical facilities and the equipment used for screenings such as mammaograms are not always as accessible as they need to be.

Educating women with IDD, families and physicians is essential to help raise awareness of the importance of early detection.  To lower your risk of getting breast cancer it is important to control your weight and exercise, limit the amount of alcohol you drink and know your family medical history.  If you provide services to people with disabilities, teaching those you care for to perform an at home self breast exam can improve the changes of discovering  lumps orchanges, such as tenderness, skin texture and color or enlargement of pores, that can indicate a problem.

HealthMeetPrograms, such as The Arc’s HealthMeet project and the Women Be Healthy program, offer information and resources for women with disabilities and their caregivers to learn more about the facts behind the need to receive these screenings.  Visit The Arc’s HealthMeet Webinar page to view our past webinar detailing results from the Women Be Healthy study.  Remember to advocate for the women in your life by supporting them to understand and receive these preventative screenings.

Take Charge of Your Health Online

Self-Advocacy OnlineBy Kerry Mauger, Training Coordinator, The Arc

The Arc’s HealthMeet initiative has partnered with The University of Minnesota to develop two educational modules about exercise and wellness to be featured on an innovative new website called Self-Advocacy Online. This site is a great resource for people with an intellectual disability to gather information, find self-advocacy groups in their area, learn new ideas, and hear stories from other self-advocates just like them who have similar fears, dreams and aspirations in life.

Now on the site, self-advocates can access lessons to help guide them in living a healthier lifestyle and finding ways to become more active and increase their fitness level.  These digital lessons are created with input from a team of self-advocates to ensure that all the material included in them is accessible to individuals with all types of disabilities.  Each module uses accessible language, has a self-advocate speaking for the audio portion and uses entertaining pictures and short video clips to reinforce the messages in the lessons.

The first module, “Taking Care of Myself,” is an overview of what it means to live a happy, healthy life.  It explains the big-picture view that to be healthy and happy it means taking care of your body as well as your mind, and learning to develop healthy relationships with people that support you.  The second module, “Exercise,” is all about the different types of exercise (cardio, strength and stretching) that your body needs in order for it to be healthy. It explains why it is essential that we exercise, how many times a week is recommended and uses short video clips to show different exercises that you can do along with the instructor.

These resources help teach healthy lifestyle lessons and are available for self-advocates to watch and refer back to at their own pace as often as they like.  Learning is a process is that never stops.  Through the HealthMeet project, The Arc plans to build two additional healthy lesson modules in the upcoming year to help empower self-advocates to take charge of their own health and wellness.  Resources like Self-Advocacy Online are a stepping stone to help individuals with disabilities live a more independent healthier life.

How Can the Cloud Help Your Chapter?

By Mike Holihan, MediSked, Guest Blogger

As many provider agencies adopt cloud based software solutions to manage their records, let’s examine the benefits to the people who are receiving the care and service provided to them by these agencies. How does a hosted software solution (aka cloud based; meaning it is accessed through the internet) help organizations like chapters of The Arc provide the highest quality of care to the individuals we serve?  Can the cloud make the lives of people better?  We believe it can.  Below is a list of examples of how cloud based software for providers can give crucial support staff access to information instantly, wherever they are.  The cloud takes records out the filing cabinets or binders and puts them at the point of care where they belong.  Let’s look at some examples.

  • Time searching for records: With a cloud based solution, client records are centralized and new information regarding them continually gets added to the same spot.  So you always know where to look for any type of information on an individual. Think about how agencies traditionally store information today. How long would it take a provider to find out a client’s Medicaid # or emergency contact?  Sometimes access to client records is urgent and time searching for that information in a paper storage system could be crucial. Time searching for records is a big improvement when you move to the cloud.
  • Special instructions: Special instructions are a lot more valuable when they’re at your fingertips.  Whether it’s enhanced protective oversight or allergies, when a provider organization’s staff sees them right away, they can avoid negligence and improper care.  So let’s say direct care staff is on a picnic or at the park with the people they serve and someone gets stung by a bee.  The employee could pull out their smartphone and access the client record to see if they have a bee sting allergy. If they do, there could be instructions on what to do or the employee can react quicker in calling for medical care. If they see that they don’t have an allergy, they can react in a more appropriate manner. It’s all about giving staff access to information that will help them make better decisions in case of an emergency.
  • Medication administration: Rather than waiting until the end of the week to find out if a medication has been missed or administered in error, the cloud allows for real-time records. The cloud allows an agency to become more proactive instead of being reactive. This is the benefit of “real-time” records.  Real time refers the ability to see when changes are made to a record as soon as an employee makes them in the system.  Because the system is accessed through the internet or cloud, real time records give the provider, much more power in helping provide better quality of care because you can manage things that are happening as they are happening.  As opposed to be reactive and trying to correct or fix something long after the fact.
  • Improved communications: Providers can talk to each other in real-time to inform other staff of any issues or concerns, rather than allowing those issues to grow.  A good example is, change in health, behavior, demographics, or natural supports being circulated immediately. Think about how agencies traditionally work.  Departments are siloed, meaning that one department rarely talks to another department. The cloud breaks down department walls and allows better communication around what’s really important, an individual’s care.
  • Improved outcomes: When data is available immediately, it can be used for trending and making better clinical decisions.  When it exists only in a notebook, it is never charted or tracked.  A good example: seizures, weight, behaviors, falls, choking, blood glucose, and more. If ignored, these predictive variables could be missed and an individual could end up in the hospital, where they are more likely to contract other illnesses.  Again it’s about being proactive and the cloud allows that to happen!

For more information on how the cloud helps chapters of The Arc improve the quality of care, get a free e-report.