Disability Advocates and Professionals Join in New Orleans for The Arc’s Annual Convention

2014 Convention ArtworkNew Orleans, LA  – Next week, The Arc’s National Convention will kick off in New Orleans, Louisiana with more than 800 disability advocates, professionals, and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) coming together to learn, forge connections, and energize the disability movement. This year’s theme focuses on three key goals– To Network, To Improve, and To Lead, three simple ideas that embody what The Arc stands for.  This year’s event will have a strong focus on criminal justice issues and the I/DD population.

“The Arc’s convention is a once a year chance to bring our network of nearly 700 chapters, their members and professionals, and people with disabilities together for a unique experience.  This year, in addition to our usual activities, we are turning a national spotlight to criminal justice and disability. The Arc has a long history of standing up for the rights of people with disabilities who find themselves involved in our legal system as victims, suspects, or offenders.

“We are thrilled to be honoring James Ellis, one of the leading lawyers in the disability community. Additionally, we are excited to have two award winning documentary film makers who will be exposing the difficulties facing children with intellectual disabilities involved in our criminal justice system,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

This three day event, which will take place at the New Orleans Marriott from September 30 – October 2, will include:

  • a keynote address by award-winning author Ron Suskind, whose latest book, Life Animated, A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes and Autism shares his family’s 20 year journey with their youngest son Owen’s autism;
  • an exciting and inspirational presentation from Fred Maahs, Director of National Partnerships for Comcast Corporation and Vice President of Comcast Foundation, that touches on his personal story, his commitment to community service, and the benefits of corporate/nonprofit partnerships;
  • honoring Dr. David Braddock with The Arc’s President’s Award for his lifetime of work for individuals with disabilities including his invaluable research regarding long-term care, health promotion and disease prevention, and public policy toward disability;
  • a panel discussion with documentary film makers Karen Grau and Chip Warren of Calamari Productions, and a sneak peek at their latest film, Children of the Dumping Ground;
  • honoring James Ellis, one of the greatest legal minds in the disability community; and
  • an exciting event hosted by The Arc of Louisiana and The Arc Baton Rouge, which includes a second line parade down the Chartres Street to the Presbytere, and a scheduled guest appearance by Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne.

“We are excited to serve as the local host committee for The Arc’s national convention. With so many changes at the federal and state level including managed care, the CMS home and community based setting rule, and wage and hour issues; I think the timing of this event in New Orleans is ideal. My hope is with hundreds of advocates and the leading experts in the disability community in our backyard, we will push forward with the necessary conversations to continue to move our state in the right direction,” said Kelly Serrett, Executive Director of The Arc Louisiana.

“The Arc’s national convention is the premier event for disability advocates in our network, and we are thrilled to have everyone in New Orleans this year.  Our program covers a number of key issues facing communities in Louisiana as well as nationally, from public policy to early intervention services for families with a loved one who has a disability. We are so pleased with the line-up of speakers that will be joining us, and look forward to showing our colleagues from across the country what our great state and the city of New Orleans has to offer,” said Barry Meyer, Executive Director of The Arc Baton Rouge.

The Arc Weighs In on Dr. Phil Shows on the Case of Kelly Stapleton

Dr. Phil logoWashington, DC – Last week, Dr. Phil aired two shows about the case of Kelly Stapleton, a mother from Michigan who attempted to take the life of her daughter, Issy, who has autism, and herself last year. The Arc released the following statement in response to the reporting done by the Dr. Phil Show.

“Kelly Stapleton’s failed attempt to take the life of her daughter, Issy, must be understood for exactly what it is – a crime of the worst magnitude – and her attempt to take her own life illustrates that likely she was experiencing a significant crisis in her own mental health. The act of a parent to kill or attempt to kill her own child is not a rational act, regardless of whether the child has a disability or how challenging the circumstances, and is never acceptable and offends our deepest values and sensibilities.

“There are, though, other lessons to be learned here. Unfortunately, the horrific story of the Stapletons shows what too many families across the country are facing – a failing system of supports and services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The Stapletons were in a challenging situation and seeking help for their daughter so that she could continue to be with her family, attend school, and be a part of her community. If the system – in the end, the school district that rejected Issy’s inclusion for the school year – had not failed them, this family’s reality could have turned out very differently.

“Kelly’s actions are indefensible, and sensationalizing this family’s tragic story only hurts the public’s perception of autism. Issy’s voice, or the voice of a peer on the autism spectrum, should have been heard by the millions who tune in to Dr. Phil. His audience should have had the opportunity to learn from an individual with autism what it’s like to live with autism, and how services and supports can make a huge difference in their daily life. America needs to be woken up to this national crisis – the lack of access to services and supports for people with disabilities is an unacceptable reality and Issy and millions like her deserve much, much better,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc Commends Senator Tom Harkin’s 40 Years of Service

Senator Tom Harkin

Senator Tom Harkin

Washington, DC – The Arc released the following statement after Senator Tom Harkin’s (D-IA) final Senate Committee Hearing on disability issues entitled “Fulfilling the Promise: Overcoming Persistent Barriers to Economic Self-Sufficiency for People with Disabilities”. Senator Harkin has been a powerful advocate for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities for almost four decades, serving in both the House of Representatives and the Senate.

“Today a legend in the disability community held what is likely his final Senate Committee hearing on disability issues, advocating for individuals with disabilities until the very end of his final term in Congress. Senator Harkin has been a longtime advocate for individuals with disabilities, supporting or spearheading all major disability legislation in the last 40 years. His final hearing focused on poverty, a huge problem facing many individuals with disabilities. This hearing, like so many before, highlighted one of the key issues facing people with disabilities, and challenged legislators to look for solutions.

“Senator Harkin is a hero to The Arc and our advocates across the country, and his legacy will live on. We thank him for his years of service, and friendship to our community,” said Marty Ford, Senior Executive Officer of Public Policy for The Arc.

The Arc Calls on Cuyahoga County Prosecutor to Pursue Ice Bucket Challenge Assault Perpetrators to Fullest Extent of the Law

Washington, DC – As the nation has reacted with outrage to the incident in Bay Village, Ohio where a teenager with autism was doused with urine instead of ice water in a fake Ice Bucket Challenge, The Arc is calling on the Cuyahoga County prosecutor’s office to charge the five teenagers identified in the case to the fullest extent of the law.

“The perpetrators of this horrific act, who reportedly were neighborhood friends of the victim, need to be held accountable for their behavior.  While some seek to characterize what was done to this teen as an innocent prank, it is anything but.  Call it what it is – it was an assault and abuse.  These kinds of acts are an outright attack on the humanity of people with autism and other intellectual or developmental disabilities in Ohio and nationwide.  There is no possible excuse for this type of assault and the perpetrators should be prosecuted,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

“Unfortunately, people with disabilities experience violence and abuse at high rates, often at the hands of abusers who are known to them.  Many have a strong need to feel accepted and fit in which can, at times, lead them into places and situations with people who they think are their friends, but who are anything but.  When abuse or other violent acts are committed, whether by friends or complete strangers, our legal system must respond.  In this case, the Cuyahoga County prosecutor’s office must send a message that will stop future perpetrators in their tracks – it is not okay to attack a person with a disability,” Berns added.

The Arc has a long history of standing up for the rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), and supporting them to do the same, when they find themselves in dangerous situations and in our legal system.  Most recently, last year, The Arc was awarded a two-year grant for $400,000 by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) to develop the National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD).  This is the first national effort of its kind to bring together both victim and suspect/offender issues involving people with I/DD under one roof.  NCCJD is a national clearinghouse for research, information, evaluation, training and technical assistance for justice and disability professionals and other advocates that will build their capacity to better identify and meet the needs of people with I/DD, whose disability often goes unrecognized, and who are overrepresented in the nation’s criminal justice system.  Currently, NCCJD is developing training and technical assistance for law enforcement agencies that will support police departments like Bay Village’s force, as well as prosecutor’s offices,  such as the office in Cuyahoga County, to administer justice for people with disabilities.  And The Arc supports people with I/DD to be prepared for situations like these, connect them with other survivors of abuse and bullying, and find a collective voice to stand up against it.

The Arc also runs the Autism NOW Center, an online resource center that helps people weed through the volumes of information found online about autism spectrum disorders and provide high-quality, vetted resources and information to people with autism and other developmental disabilities, their family, friends, colleagues, teachers, employers and others.

“Never should a human have to endure such needless acts of abuse. It is never justified and it is never the victim’s fault for they may not even know why they were treated the way they were, but there are people who do. The ones who do know why this kind of abuse is so wrong are the ones who stand together, like The Arc and our chapters, which stand united to push for these random acts of abuse to be punished by law.   Random acts of kindness make a better person. Be good to those in need and one day the favor will be returned twofold,” Amy Goodman, Co-Director of the Autism NOW Center.

“We cannot stand by and accept this horrific act- the prosecutors know what they must do and they must do it swiftly to send the message that attacks on people with disabilities will not be tolerated and will be punished,” Cindy Norwood, Executive Director, The Arc of Greater Cleveland.

The Arc to Host Los Angeles Theatrical Release of Award- Winning Short Film “Menschen”

The Arc will be sponsoring a limited engagement theatrical release of the award-winning short film Menschen in Los Angeles. This film directed by Sarah R. Lotfi and produced by Anastasia M. Cummings, showcases an often forgotten part of the Holocaust. During World War II, Nazi Germany had in place a non-voluntary euthanasia program called the Action T-4 program that targeted individuals with disabilities who Hitler deemed “life unworthy of life”.  According to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, about 200,000 people with disabilities were murdered between 1940 and 1945 under this program. The film centers on a young man with a developmental disability who is taken under the wing of Austrian troops during World War II and the unlikely guardian that keeps him safe. The goal of Menschen is to show that individuals with disabilities are “life worthy of life”, a concept which embodies The Arc’s mission.

The film stars Connor Long, an actor with Down syndrome. Long, learned German for his role, and spent extensive time learning about this part of history in preparation for the filming of the movie. His work was rewarded when he was honored as Best Actor, during the Filmstock Film Festival in 2013.

“The Arc is honored to be sponsoring the Los Angeles theatrical release of Menschen, a film that sheds light on a part of history that is too often hidden. Sarah Lotfi deserves much admiration for choosing to share this important part of the Holocaust that impacted thousands of individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

“We are also thrilled to be supporting the work of Connor Long, the phenomenal actor who brought this story to life. Connor represents everything The Arc stands for, and we hope that his success as an actor inspires other individuals who have dreams of the lime light, and that his performance challenges the entertainment industry to create more dramatic roles for individuals with disabilities.” -  Peter V. Berns, CEO of The Arc

“As an individual I grew up watching The Arc play an active role in the advocacy of my brother and sister whose lives are very much impacted by their disabilities. As a filmmaker it is a beautiful thing to partner with that same organization and work together to give Menschen its Los Angeles theatrical release. For me the underlying message of the film champions the value of life and some challenges of disability that are relevant to this day.” -Sarah R. Lotfi

“We feel very fortunate to have this opportunity to work alongside an organization like The Arc that passionately champions the quality of life for individuals who otherwise would not have advocacy. This is a very special partnership to share our film Menschen, whose message truly coincides with the mission statement of The Arc.” – Anastasia M. Cummings

“I am so happy that The Arc of Los Angeles and Orange Counties is able to be a part of this theatrical release.  A dark part of history is exposed in this film, and it is important for audiences to understand the suffering that hundreds of thousands of individuals with disabilities faced during this time. I am grateful to the director and producers for telling this story, and of course to Connor for his hard work in making this film a success.” – Kevin MacDonald, CEO, The Arc of Los Angeles and Orange Counties

This theatrical release will make Menschen eligible for consideration during award season. Screenings will be held at Landmark’s Nuart Theatre, on August 15th, 16th, and 17th, at 11AM and 12PM. Tickets are $5 and can be purchased online. After each screening, a Q&A will be held with Sarah Lofti and Anastasia M. Cummings.

The Arc Calls on the Federal Government to Hire More People with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities

Washington, DC – Yesterday, The Arc submitted comments to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) calling on the federal government to become a model employer of people with disabilities, including individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

“While the last few years have seen some modest increases in the numbers of people with disabilities employed by the federal government, The Arc remains deeply concerned that many people with the most significant disabilities, including jobseekers with intellectual and developmental disabilities, are being left behind,” said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc.

Data obtained by The Arc from the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) reveal that in fiscal year 2012, the federal government employed only 813 non-seasonal, full time permanent employees with intellectual disability (ID), representing 0.044% of all federal employees.   Only 28 people, or 3/100ths of one-percent of total new hires, were people with ID.  That same year, the federal government employed only 118 part-time employees with ID.  Only 17 people with ID were hired as part-time employees, about 9/100ths of one-percent of new hires.

“While we are pleased that the EEOC is moving forward with strengthening federal regulations, the shockingly low rate of federal employment of people with intellectual disability is unacceptable. The Arc calls on the federal government to act immediately to remove barriers to employment for people with disabilities in the federal workforce, establish strong goals for hiring of people with disabilities, including people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and hold agencies accountable for meeting those goals.

“There is no need for OPM to wait for the EEOC to complete the rulemaking process before it takes action to address this problem.  OPM already has authority under existing law and under Executive Order 13548 to take action now,” Berns said.

Issued by President Obama on July 26, 2010, E.O. 13548, titled “Increasing Federal Employment of Individuals with Disabilities,” calls on the Federal Government to hire 100,000 people with disabilities over five years.

“As a first step, OPM should direct federal agencies to update and revise the “agency-specific plans for promoting employment opportunities for individuals with disabilities” required under the Executive Order so that they specifically address employment of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. There are other steps that can be taken today.   The Federal Communications Commission has already embarked on an initiative to hire people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in that agency.  Other agencies should get started too.

“Across the United States, The Arc has nearly 700 state and local chapters in 49 states and DC that stand ready to assist the federal government in identifying people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who are ready to work and whose abilities will be an asset to federal agencies. The federal government can and should be a model employer of people with disabilities. The Arc will continue to closely monitor annual reports on the federal employment of people with disabilities to ensure progress and accountability,” said Berns.

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics regularly reports that the percentage of working-age people with disabilities in the labor force is about one-third that of persons with no disability. On average, workers with disabilities face significant gaps in pay and compensation, compared to workers with no disability. Additionally, about one in three employment discrimination charges filed with the EEOC allege discrimination on the basis of disability (often, in combination with charges of other types of discrimination).

The Arc’s own research suggests that the employment picture for people with I/DD may be even bleaker. In 2010, The Arc conducted a national online survey, called the FINDS Survey, to obtain perceptions of people with I/DD and their families on a range of life-span issues. Over 5,000 people participated. Only 15% of FINDS survey respondents reported that their family member with an intellectual and/or developmental disability was employed.

Employment – Congress Reauthorizes Vital Workforce Programs

This summer has seen Congressional action on several critical issues for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD). One long-awaited – and a top legislative priority for The Arc – was last week’s House passage of legislation to reauthorize vital workforce programs, including Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) services under the Rehabilitation Act. The Arc applauds the bipartisan, bicameral leadership that led to this important reauthorization and the Members of Congress who voted in favor of the legislation.

On July 9th, the House of Representatives passed the Workforce Innovation Opportunity Act (WIOA) by a vote of 415 to 6, with 11 abstaining. The House vote followed Senate passage in late June by a vote of 95-3. WIOA now goes to President Obama who is expected to sign the bill soon.

WIOA reauthorizes the Workforce Investment Act for 6 years, from FY 2015 to FY 2020. The bill is a bipartisan, bicameral compromise between the SKILLS Act (H.R. 803), which passed the House in March of 2013, and the Workforce Investment Act of 2013 (S. 1356), which passed the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee in July of 2013. The proposal was develop by Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA), Representative John Kline (R-MN), Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Representative George Miller (D-CA), Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), Representative Virginia Foxx (R-NC), Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA), and Representative Rubén Hinojosa (D-TX).

In general WIOA focuses VR outcomes on competitive, integrated employment and promotes greater emphasis on transition services for youth with disabilities. WIOA also provides increased emphasis on coordination between VR and other agencies including school systems; extends the initial time period for VR supported employment services (from 18 to 24 months); and modifies eligibility determination to promote access to VR by people with the most significant disabilities.

The provisions in WIOA related to VR services and the Rehabilitation Act are generally similar to proposals put forward by the Senate HELP Committee over the last several years, with some modifications and refinements that represent elements from the SKILLS Act. For example:

  • In one version of its discussion drafts, the Senate HELP Committee proposed moving the federal Rehabilitation Services Administration (RSA) from the Department of Education to the Department of Labor. In contrast, under WIOA, RSA will stay at the Department of Education.
  • In an early version, the SKILLS Act had proposed consolidating many core workforce programs – including VR Supported Employment Services – into a single block-grant type structure, and giving states the option to further consolidate all VR services into that single state structure. The Arc strongly opposed this proposal. In contrast, WIOA does not include this sweeping consolidation; it permits some limited consolidations, but not of VR or Supported Employment Services.

Many details of how WIOA will operate in states will need to be worked out in new regulations and policies developed after passage of the bill. It is likely that the Departments of Labor and Education will work closely with other agencies, including the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and the Department of Justice, in developing regulatory and policy guidance.

Congress last reauthorized the Workforce Investment Act in 1998. Over the last few years, reauthorization of these workforce programs, including VR services under the Rehabilitation Act, has been a top priority for The Arc. The Arc advocated for many improvements now incorporated under WIOA, consistent with our past and current position statements on Employment, and joined with other national disability groups to express strong support following the announcement of the WIOA compromise this past May.

A one-page summary of WIOA can be found here.

The statement of managers, including a section-by-section summary of the legislation, can be found here.

A summary of key improvements WIOA makes to current workforce development programs can be found here.

 

The Arc Applauds Passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act

The Arc released the following statement applauding the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA).  WIOA is a bipartisan, bicameral compromise between the SKILLS Act (H.R. 803), which passed the House of Representatives in March of 2013, and the Workforce Investment Act of 2013 (S. 1356), which passed the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee in July of 2013. The proposal was developed by Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA), Representative John Kline (R-MN), Senator Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Representative George Miller (D-CA), Senator Patty Murray (D-WA), Representative Virginia Foxx (R-NC), Senator Johnny Isakson (R-GA), and Representative Rubén Hinojosa (D-TX).

“Everyone should have the opportunity to earn a competitive salary while contributing to their community, which is why we are thrilled with the passage of the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act. The Arc applauds the bill’s focus on integrated, competitive employment for individuals with disabilities, and on essential transition services for youth with disabilities who need them to attain and hold a job. We are grateful to the Members of Congress who developed and supported this important legislation and stood up for individuals with disabilities who want to work, but need additional supports to reach their career goals,” said, Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc joined with other national disability groups to express strong support for WIOA.  Congress last reauthorized the workforce investment programs under WIOA in 1998. Over the last few years, reauthorization of the Workforce Investment Act, including the vocational rehabilitation (VR) services under the Rehabilitation Act, has been a top priority for The Arc’s public policy agenda. The Arc advocated for many improvements to the system now incorporated under WIOA, consistent with its past and current position statements on Employment.

In general WIOA focuses vocational rehabilitation (VR) outcomes on competitive, integrated employment and promotes greater emphasis on transition services for youth with disabilities. WIOA also provides increased emphasis on coordination between VR and other agencies including school systems, extends the initial time period for VR supported employment services (from 18 to 24 months), and modifies eligibility determination to promote access to VR by people with the most significant disabilities.

Chapters of The Arc Selected for National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability’s “Pathways to Justice” Training Program

We are pleased to announce that five chapters of The Arc were selected to pilot implementation of The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability’s (NCCJD) “Pathways to Justice” Training Program. Through this program, chapters will help build the capacity of the criminal justice system to effectively identify, serve and protect people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), many of whom have “mild” disabilities that often go unnoticed among criminal justice professionals without appropriate training.

Each chapter will create and/or strengthen their current multidisciplinary team on criminal justice and disability issues (what NCCJD is referring to as “Disability Response Teams”) and gather roughly 50 trainees from law enforcement, victim advocacy and the legal profession for a one-day training on criminal justice issues. The selected chapters are listed below:

“When individuals with I/DD become involved in the criminal justice system as suspects or victims, they often face miscommunication, fear, confusion and prejudice. The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability plays a critical role in improving first response and communication between people with I/DD and the justice system nationally.

“Through NCCJD’s “Pathways to Justice” training program we are tapping into the most powerful resource The Arc possesses – our chapter network. The five chapters selected either have longstanding criminal justice programs or a commitment to building their capacity in providing such training, both of which are invaluable to achieving NCCJD’s overall goals. We look forward to working closely with each chapter and learning from their work. Through this collaborative effort NCCJD will become a national focal point for the collection and dissemination of resources and serve as a bridge between the justice and disability communities,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

Last year, The Arc was awarded a two-year grant for $400,000 by the U.S. Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) to develop the National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability.  This is the first national effort of its kind to bring together both victim and suspect/offender issues involving people with I/DD under one roof.  The goal of this project is to create a national clearinghouse for research, information, evaluation, training and technical assistance for justice and disability professionals and other advocates that will build their capacity to better identify and meet the needs of people with I/DD, whose disability often goes unrecognized, and who are overrepresented in the nation’s criminal justice system – both as victims and suspects/offenders

PBATS and The Arc Join Forces to Promote Inclusion

Peter Berns with Gene Gieselmann, David Phelps, Neil Romano

Gene Gieselmann, Founding Member, PBATS/Head Athletic Trainer, St. Louis Cardinals (1969 – 1997); Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer, The Arc; David Phelps, Pitcher, New York Yankees; Neil Romano, Former Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy
Photo credit: New York Yankees. All rights reserved.

BRONX, NY (May 30, 2014) – The Professional Baseball Athletic Trainers Society (PBATS) and The Arc announced today at Yankee Stadium a partnership to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in sporting activities nationwide.

In 2014, The Arc – a nonprofit organization that aims to promote and protect the human rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities – will contribute through the involvement of their local chapters and children with disabilities at PBATS’ PLAY (Promoting a Lifetime of Activity for Youth) Campaign events nationwide.

“We are thrilled about this partnership with The Arc,” PBATS President Mark O’Neal said. “This is a great platform to spread the message of inclusion and to afford children with disabilities the opportunity to participate in the PLAY Campaign and spend a day at their favorite Major League ballpark.”

Representing PBATS at Yankee Stadium Friday were founding members Gene Monahan (New York Yankees Head Athletic Trainer, 1973-2011) and Gene Gieselmann (St. Louis Cardinals Head Athletic Trainer, 1969-1997); Senior Advisor Neil Romano (former Assistant Secretary of Labor for Disability Employment Policy); and Head Athletic Trainers Steve Donohue (Yankees) and Dave Pruemer (Minnesota Twins).

Said Peter V. Berns, Chief Executive Officer of The Arc: “We are excited to be a part of the PLAY Campaign this year because we know these events will be a lot of fun for kids associated with our chapters, will teach them about the importance of health and wellness in their lives, and will raise awareness of The Arc and the population we serve in the baseball world.”

The PLAY Campaign – conducted at all 30 Major League Baseball stadiums each season – is a public awareness campaign of PBATS. The campaign is designed to help combat childhood obesity and promote a healthy and active lifestyle by promoting fun activities and good decision making. Originally developed in 2004, PLAY is now the longest running health campaign in professional sports directed specifically at young people.

The PLAY Campaign events are typically two hours in length and include stations hosted by experts from across the United States. This year, for the first time, children with intellectual and developmental disabilities from chapters of The Arc will participate alongside children without disabilities at these events.

The campaign event stations include the Henry Schein Cares Foundation’s presentation on oral hygiene, the Taylor Hooton Foundation’s presentation on appearance and performance enhancing drug education, baseball specific activity stations with Major League Baseball athletic trainers, an educational session with regard to nutrition tips and a question and answer session with a Major League player from the hosting team.

PBATS members will host the PLAY Campaign events in all 30 Major League Stadiums in 2014 where they will educate over 2,000 young people and their parents.