The Arc’s Center for Future Planning™ Launches Financial Literacy Training for Low-Income Families with Children with Disabilities

Washington, DC – The Arc’s Center for Future Planning™ is pleased to announce it has received a $200,000 two-year grant from the MetLife Foundation.  This funding will be dedicated toward developing a new financial literacy training program for families that include a child with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), with a specific interest in reaching historically underserved racial and ethnic communities.

Research has shown that disability and poverty are intertwined, and many families that have a child with I/DD struggle financially.  Often, income declines when a child with I/DD is born because parents take time off of work or leave the workforce entirely to care for the child’s needs.  This reduction of household income, combined with the income and asset limits in many public means-tested benefits available to these families, only complicates asset building.

The training will address these challenges by educating and supporting low-income families to lay the foundation for a secure financial future for their child with I/DD.  More specifically, The Arc will develop a financial literacy curriculum that can be later distributed throughout The Arc’s national network of over 650 chapters.  Topics to be covered will include credit, debt, choosing financial products and services, investing, and asset protection, as well as disability-related topics, such as information on benefits for people with disabilities, as well as special needs trusts and ABLE Act accounts.

“During our 65 year history, The Arc has always recognized the importance of supporting families of people with I/DD.  In these challenging economic times, it is all the more important that we work with families of children with I/DD to stabilize the family’s financial situation.  This support from the MetLife Foundation will allow The Arc to assist families in achieving long-term financial stability,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc will lead a team to create a nationally replicable, culturally competent curriculum to provide financial literacy education to low-income families.  After piloting the training with three chapters, The Arc will modify the curriculum so that it can be distributed through our network of chapters around the country. This work will also be supported by the Family Support Research and Training Center through a subcontract with the University of Illinois at Chicago and made possible by grant number 90RT5032-02-01 from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR) at the US Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Community Living (US DHHS/ACL).

The mission of The Arc’s Center for Future Planning is to support and encourage adults with I/DD and their families to plan for the future. The Center provides reliable information and assistance to individuals with I/DD, their family members and friends, professionals who support them and other members of the community on areas such as person-centered planning, decision-making, housing options, and financial planning.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

The Arc of Delaware Reaches Fair Housing Settlement

Washington, DCThe Arc of Delaware and its counsel Relman, Dane & Colfax, The Arc of the United States, and Community Legal Aid Society, Inc. are thrilled to announce the recent settlement of The Arc of Delaware’s disability discrimination complaint against Sugar Maple Farms Property Owners’ Association, Inc. (SMFPOA). That complaint, filed in March 2015 with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Delaware Division of Human Relations (DHR), sought a declaration that SMFPOA violated the Fair Housing Act when it refused to approve The Arc of Delaware’s acquisition of property meant to house four individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in a single family home integrated within the community. The complaint sought damages to compensate for the loss of housing opportunities and for violations of the federal and Delaware Fair Housing Acts due to disability discrimination. After DHR issued a finding of discrimination in March 2016, SMFPOA agreed to settle the case and has entered into a Conciliation Agreement with DHR, HUD, and The Arc of Delaware as of May 26, 2016.

“This case shows the importance of vigorously enforcing the Fair Housing Act,” noted Michael Allen, a partner with Relman, Dane & Colfax.  “Although the Act has prohibited disability discrimination for nearly 30 years, we still need to fight every day to redeem the promise of community living for people with disabilities.”

In July 2014, Terry Olson, Executive Director, submitted a bid on behalf of The Arc of Delaware for a lot owned by SMFPOA. The Arc of Delaware intended to build a single family house in a Milford, Delaware residential subdivision with 65 other lots. His offer was accepted by the seller contingent on SMFPOA’s approval of the sale. However, once SMFPOA learned that residents with I/DD would be living there, it told Mr. Olson that such use was barred by its covenants and also expressed concerns about the amount of parking that would be required by the residents’ support staff.

Mr. Olson tried to explain that The Arc of Delaware’s use was protected by the Fair Housing Act and offered to accommodate the extra parking needs while maintaining a uniform appearance within the community. He also offered to give SMFPOA members a tour of a similar home in the area in order to allay any concerns about daily operations. Shortly thereafter, The Arc of Delaware received a letter from SMFPOA reiterating its position that the sale was not approved because it would violate SMFPOA’s covenants and suggesting that allowing people with I/DD into the community would reduce property values and disturb the “quiet enjoyment” of neighbors. The loss of the property and subsequent delay in state funding have deprived The Arc of Delaware and its clients of at least four community-based housing opportunities.

The Fair Housing Amendments Act of 1988 (FHAA) makes it unlawful to “make unavailable or deny” a dwelling because of disability as well as to refuse to make “reasonable accommodations in rules, policies, practices, or services, when such accommodations may be necessary to afford such person equal opportunity to use and enjoy a dwelling.” Federal courts have consistently held that community supported housing for unrelated individuals with I/DD does not constitute a “business” and does not violate “single family” restrictions, and Delaware law expressly recognizes such housing as “single family” properties for zoning purposes. Further, the courts recognize that most discriminatory remarks are made in coded language, such as the need to “maintain property value.”

Once the complaints had been filed, DHR performed an investigation and issued a finding of discrimination in March 2016. Subsequently, SMFPOA agreed to settle the case. Among other things, the Conciliation Agreement requires SMFPOA to:

  • Apply the same terms and conditions of rental to anyone occupying its properties without regard to disability or any other protected class;
  • Provide written compliance reports to DHR and/or HUD when requested;
  • Allow HUD and DHR to inspect the premises at any time within one year of the agreement;
  • Notify its members and residents in writing of rules, policies, and practices relating to its non-discrimination policy and to prominently display the Equal Housing Opportunity logo within any relevant advertisements it distributes;
  • Ensure that all of its current board members receive comprehensive training on the Fair Housing Act within 90 days of signing the agreement and that all future board members receive such training within 30 days of their election;
  • Pay The Arc of Delaware $55,000 in damages, including attorneys’ fees and costs.

Mr. Olson remarked: “It is challenging enough in Delaware for individuals with I/DD to find affordable housing in the community. When you add discrimination to the mix, it makes it nearly impossible. This victory will help ensure that individuals with disabilities in Delaware will have the same rights as other citizens to live in the community of their choice.”

Shira Wakschlag, Staff Attorney with The Arc of the United States, noted: “For more than 65 years, The Arc has sought to enforce and protect the human and civil rights of individuals with I/DD by working to ensure those with disabilities are able to live in the community free from discrimination and institutional settings. Without the vigorous enforcement of state and federal disability rights laws in instances of discrimination such as this one, this fundamental right would be eroded.”

Relman, Dane & Colfax, a civil rights law firm based in Washington, D.C., served as lead counsel on the case, with The Arc of the United States and Community Legal Aid Society, Inc. serving as co-counsel.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country, including The Arc of Delaware, promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

Zika – We All Have Skin in This Game

Some public health crises capture our attention more than others.  A few years back, the phones were ringing off the hook on Capitol Hill about Ebola.  But not so for the Zika virus, we are hearing from Congressional offices.  Is this because we think that Zika will only affect women who are pregnant?  Or just those who live in southern states?  Are we not understanding that this virus could potentially quickly spread in local communities or that people in the south who are at greatest risk right now travel to other parts of the country?

Such a false sense of immunity could cost us dearly.  Studies are rolling in and, taken together, are painting an alarming picture.  According to a study released last week, two million pregnant women in the U.S. could contract the virus by November while another study finds that 29% of Zika-infected women gave birth to babies with adverse outcomes, including stillbirth, microcephaly, and other serious health problems.  Another found that microcephaly alone occurs in up to 13% of babies born to their mothers who became infected during their first trimester.  And this is only what we do know.  Still unknown are, among other things, the long-term effects of Zika on adults and children who contract the virus after birth.  “We still don’t know yet the full rainbow of complications that this virus may produce,” according to the director of communicable diseases for the Pan-American Health Organization.

If we don’t act now, the implications could be dramatic in both the short and long term.  For instance, the travel industry could be decimated in the southern coastal states this summer as infection rates and corresponding fear rise.   Further down the road, state Medicaid programs could see a surge in demand for services for not just people with microcephaly, but those with the still unknown other disabilities that may be significant and lifelong.

Congress left for its Memorial Day recess before having finalized an emergency spending bill for Zika prevention.  When it reconvenes this week, it is imperative that Members hear from their constituents who understand that that Zika prevention is truly a national and urgent priority. Stay up to date on this issue and many others impacting people with disabilities by signing up for our Disability Advocacy Network – be in-the-know and take action when needed!

Senate Acts on Zika Funding; The Arc Urges House to Step Up

Washington, DC – With a new public health threat on the horizon for our country, yesterday the U.S. Senate finally acted to provide some of the funding necessary to address the Zika virus. With repurposed funding running out and summer quickly approaching, The Arc and our national network of advocates are urging the House to step up and pass a bill that provides funding to address this issue.

“The clock is ticking, and with every passing day, we are less and less prepared to face this impending public health crisis. We have the ability to mitigate the impact of this mosquito- carried virus, with an investment in mosquito reduction, accelerated vaccine development, and better testing. But Congress has been wasting time, playing politics with public health. Thankfully, the Senate’s action yesterday to approve a down payment on addressing this issue is a step in the right direction. We urge the House to follow suit quickly,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

In February, the White House asked for $1.9 billion for Zika vaccine development, better testing, and mosquito reduction. With no action taken by Congress, in April the White House transferred $589 million from money set aside to fight Ebola and other problems to work on Zika prevention efforts. But that’s far short of the amount health officials say they need to be effective and that funding will run out at the end of June. Yesterday, the Senate approved $1.1 billion to combat Zika this year and next year.

While Zika is usually harmless to adults, some women infected with Zika while pregnant give birth to babies with severely disabling brain injury, including microcephaly. Many of The Arc’s more than 650 chapters provide supports and services to families and people with a range of disabilities, including severe disabilities.

The Arc has long held a position on the prevention of intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), supporting our national efforts to continue to investigate the causes, reduce the incidence and limit the consequences of I/DD through education, clinical and applied research, advocacy, and appropriate supports. We firmly believe that prevention activities do not diminish the value of any individual, but rather strive to maximize independence and enhance quality of life for people with I/DD.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

The Arc Awarded Grant from Amerigroup Foundation for Health and Fitness for All Project

Washington, DC – The Arc is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a $90,000 grant from the Amerigroup Foundation to conduct its Health and Fitness for All project at three chapters of The Arc in Texas and Tennessee. The Health and Fitness for All project utilizes the HealthMatters™ program, which is a training developed by the University of Illinois at Chicago that provides structured information on how to organize and start a tailored physical activity and health education program for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD).

With Amerigroup Foundation’s support, three of The Arc’s chapters that are certified in the HealthMatters program, The Arc San Antonio, The Arc Greater Houston, and The Arc Tennessee, will implement the 12-week program to help increase participant’s knowledge about the importance of healthy eating and staying active.

“We are thrilled to be expanding this program with chapters of The Arc that have already demonstrated a commitment to the health and wellness of people with I/DD in their communities. The Amerigroup Foundation’s support will go a long way in supporting people with I/DD to make healthier decisions in their day to day lives,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, adults with disabilities have a 58% higher rate of obesity than adults without disabilities. Since The Arc started using the HealthMatters curriculum in 2012, the program has reached almost 500 participants to help them learn about healthy eating and the importance of staying active. The chapter activities being supported by Anthem, known as Amerigroup in those states, will reach a total of 150 participants.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 665 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

The Arc Reacts to Newly Released CDC Autism Report Showing No Increase in Prevalence in Two Years

Washington, DC – Today, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released new data showing the prevalence of Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) remains unchanged;   1 in 68 children have been identified as having a diagnosis on the autism spectrum between 2010 and 2012.  

“While the data does not indicate an increase in autism prevalence, this does not mean that the numbers have stabilized. Previously, we have seen periods in which prevalence has remained unchanged. Between 2000 and 2002, the prevalence rate of 1 in 150 held steady, but was then followed by a dramatic rise that continued for a decade. 

“The most important thing to take away from this report is the need for early diagnosis and intervention. It is concerning that minorities, specifically black and Hispanic populations, continue to be more likely to receive a diagnosis years after their white peers. The earlier a developmental evaluation takes place, the sooner individuals and their families can begin receiving early intervention supports. Another area for improvement is access to high-quality, affordable developmental services in the community. The Arc strongly believes that all children who have been identified with autism or other disabilities deserve this access to appropriate services.

“The numbers may not have changed, but this report gives us much to think about and data to strengthen our calls to action for more resources and earlier intervention,” said Peter V. Berns, CEO of The Arc.

ASDs are a group of developmental disabilities that are often diagnosed in early childhood and can cause significant social, communication, and behavioral challenges over a lifetime.  Chapters of The Arc across the country provide services and supports for people with autism and their families.

The Arc’s national office has several programs for persons with ASD: Autism Now: The National Autism Resource and Information Center; Wings for Autism, a national airport rehearsal program for people with autism or other developmental disabilities, and their families; and The Arc@Work, a program that develops innovative workforce solutions for the government and private sector by connecting employers with talented employees with autism or other disabilities and supporting the recruitment, on-boarding, and retention process.

 

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase. 

The Arc Awarded Contribution for New Center for Special Education Advocacy

Washington, DC – The Arc is pleased to announce that it has been awarded a contribution from AT&T to create a new Center for Special Education Advocacy called TheArc@School. The center will support students with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) to graduate from high school and pursue post-secondary education and employment by improving the quality and availability of trained lay advocates to support the development and implementation of Individualized Education Programs (IEPs).

All students who qualify for special education services are legally required to have an IEP to ensure they are receiving the support and guidance necessary to successfully pursue their educational goals. The IEP process requires an annual meeting between teachers, administrators, parents and students. In the meeting, attendees discuss everything from students’ present levels of academic achievement to their future goals and any accommodations or modifications they need in the classroom.

“These discussions can be overwhelming and intimidating for parents – many parents in The Arc’s network have shared that they are hesitant to express their opinions, they feel they do not have the expertise to participate, or that they are not encouraged to participate. As a result, plans often set low expectations or lack personalization, making it difficult for students to stay on track to achieve their full potential. TheArc@School aims to improve the process,”
said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

Currently, in order to make the process more manageable, some families choose to work with professional advocates. These advocates can be incredibly knowledgeable and can act as an excellent resource for parents and students, but many receive no formal training; they often become experts through their own personal experience navigating the special education system, usually as parents or teachers.

This contribution will allow The Arc to start by collecting data about current methods and practices, as little information about effective practices exists at this time. After analyzing this data to identify best practices, The Arc will disseminate this information through a comprehensive online resource center, making it easily available to parents, students, advocates, chapters of The Arc, and school administrators. The Arc will use this data on effective practices to inform planning to develop a comprehensive training effort aimed at lay advocates.

“AT&T is thrilled to collaborate with The Arc to provide a more comprehensive support system for students along with the resources they need for success,” said Nicole Anderson, executive director of philanthropy at AT&T. “The Center for Special Education Advocacy will be a key voice in making education accessible to more students.”

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 665 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

 

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

About Philanthropy and Social Innovation at AT&T

AT&T Inc. is committed to advancing education, strengthening communities and improving lives. Through its community initiatives, AT&T has a long history of investing in projects that create learning opportunities; promote academic and economic achievement; or address community needs. AT&T Aspire is AT&T’s signature philanthropic initiative that drives innovation in education by bringing diverse resources to bear on the issue including funding, technology, employee volunteerism, and mentoring. Through Aspire, we’ve passed the $250 million mark on our plan to invest $350 million in education from 2008-2017.

The Arc Awarded National Grant to Engage in Martin Luther King Jr. National Service Day Activities

WASHINGTON, DC – The federal agency that leads national Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), has selected The Arc and five other organizations as grantees to plan and execute volunteer projects that will unite Americans in service. The 2016 MLK Day of Service will take place on Monday, January 18, and The Arc, through select chapters, will be involved in service events throughout January where people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) will volunteer alongside people without disabilities in an activity related to access to healthy food.

“People with intellectual and developmental disabilities have so much to offer their communities, and this day of service opportunity provides them the chance to give back.  Many perceive people with disabilities as the ones in need of service – but in reality, they are often a part of civic engagement at the state, local, and national level.  Being a part of this national community service day will shine a spotlight on what people with disabilities offer in their community,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

Each year, hundreds of thousands of Americans participate in the annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. National Day of Service, the nation’s largest day of civic engagement. In 1994, Congress designated MLK Day as the first and only federal holiday observed as a national day of service, and charged CNCS with leading this effort.

Each project will serve a community that has seen an increase in unemployment and the number of children living in poverty over the past 5 years. Food security, especially healthy food for children, is a concern for these communities. Each chapter of The Arc will partner with a local service club to carry out activities.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 665 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

The Arc Announces $1.4 Million Google.org Investment in Tech Toolbox

Washington, DC – The Arc is thrilled to announce that it is a recipient of a $1.4 million grant from Google.org. Made through the Google Impact Challenge: Disabilities, the grant will support an online search, recommendation and coaching platform that will help people with cognitive disabilities find and adopt technology to live fuller lives.

With Google.org’s support, The Arc will expand the features and services around its Tech Toolbox, a place to find, share, rate and review technology for people with intellectual or developmental disabilities (I/DD).  More than 20 million people in the United States have a cognitive disability. The number of apps and assistive technologies available to support this population is growing rapidly, but the outcomes they promise are rarely backed by evidence, and it is difficult to match the right tool to the unique and evolving needs of the individual.

“At Google, we know that good things happen when you help people find the right information. We’re thrilled to support The Arc’s efforts to make it as easy as possible for people with disabilities and their families to find the right technology to meet their needs. In the long run, we see the Tech Toolbox becoming a go-to resource for information about the ways that technology can change the lives of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities by sharing information about solutions that really work,” said Jacquelline Fuller, Director, Google.org.

The Arc will build a web platform that uses profile data and expert reviews to help people with cognitive disabilities and their caregivers easily identify the technologies that are most likely to produce positive outcomes based on evidence from people with similar profiles.

“People with disabilities, their family members, providers, and friends are seeking out technology to help them lead more independent and fulfilling lives.  Even though many of The Arc’s chapters have already started to address this demand, with great success, not enough is known about how this constantly evolving marketplace is meeting their needs, and how information from their experiences can be harnessed to make greater strides in the field.  We are excited to be working with Google, a company synonymous with innovation, to connect our network and individuals to their know-how in the technology space.  It’s going to be an exciting journey as we partner with them to build this capability,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc will use its national service provider network to deliver more than 100,000 targeted and personalized technology recommendations over the next two and a half years. The platform will be open to the public and, at scale, will reach millions of individuals and their families.

In 2014, The Arc started building the Tech Toolbox because of the need for a service that helps people with I/DD access technology.  Through a national partnership with the Comcast Foundation, The Arc was able to launch a beta version of the platform in 2015. Staff from across The Arc’s chapter network came together to design a one-stop-shop, peer- reviewed directory of technology products that are effective for people with I/DD. Through this directory, chapter staff, people with I/DD, and the general public can find, review, and post examples of technology tools that work well for them. The Tech Toolbox currently contains nearly 500 apps and devices.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 665 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

 

 

Editor’s Notes

The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

Cognitive disability includes intellectual disability, including those caused by congenital conditions such as Down syndrome, autism, and Fetal Alcohol Syndrome as well as age-related conditions such as Dementia. The diagnosis may also include less severe conditions such as Dyslexia, Attention Deficit Disorder, and other learning disabilities.

The Arc’s Heart Breaks for Victims in San Bernardino

Washington, DC – The Arc, the nation’s largest civil rights organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families, released the following statement on the tragic shooting at the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, California:

“Our deepest condolences go out to the families and friends of those who lost their lives in this tragedy, the people suffering injuries, and the families impacted by this senseless act. The Arc’s collective heart is broken.

“The Inland Regional Center is one of thousands of service systems across the country for people with I/DD and their families. It’s a place where people with disabilities, their families, caregivers, and dedicated staff gather to access services, learn how to navigate the service delivery system, and enjoy functions like the holiday party that took place the day before the shooting. It’s not a place you would ever expect such violence.

“Today, and every day after, people with disabilities, parents, siblings, caregivers, and staff will walk into the Inland Regional Center. When will they feel safe again? They will live with this trauma, feel the pain like anyone else, and they must have access to services to support them to overcome it. Far too often in our society, the abilities of people with I/DD are underestimated. Appropriate supports must be available to them to process and heal after this tragedy, otherwise it will be an open wound. We owe all of those touched by this tragedy the dignity of healing,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

Read The Arc of California’s statement.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 665 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.