The Arc, Other Advocates Launch Modern Medicaid Alliance New Initiative Highlights Benefits, Stories, and Innovations of Program

Washington, D.C. – Despite the enormous societal and economic benefits offered by the modern Medicaid program, a lack of dialogue about the true value of the program drives misperceptions relating to it. Today, an alliance of more than two dozen national advocacy organizations formally launched with the aim of educating the public and policy makers about the Medicaid program and its importance for the more than 70 million Americans covered by it.

The Arc joined advocates for low-income Americans, children’s health and well-being, people with mental illness, people with disabilities, health care providers, and business organizations today in announcing their participation in the Modern Medicaid Alliance (MMA). A list of the members of the Modern Medicaid Alliance can be found here.

From lowering health care costs to delivering better health outcomes for beneficiaries, Medicaid keeps our nation healthier and enables more citizens to have access to affordable, quality healthcare so they can care for their families and be productive in the workplace. The largest health care program in the country has also become a proven laboratory for innovation as cash-strapped states have sought solutions for difficult population health issues. Despite its positive impact on tens of millions of people and America as a whole, the need for greater awareness among policymakers and the public about the value of our investment in it remains high.

“Medicaid is the backbone of our system of services and supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and the critical role it plays in providing long term services and supports is often overlooked. We welcome the opportunity to be a voice for the vital role the program plays in providing health care and assisting people with I/DD to live and work in the community,” said Marty Ford, Senior Executive Officer for Public Policy at The Arc.

About the Modern Medicaid Alliance: The Modern Medicaid Alliance works as a collective group of organizations and grassroots members to educate policymakers and the public about the benefits of Medicaid to the American people and to highlight how Medicaid’s innovative solutions are positively impacting those it serves with the goal of ensuring the benefits and best practices of today’s Medicaid program can impact as many of the program’s 70 million beneficiaries as possible.

About The Arc: The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, Autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, Cerebral Palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of 700 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

The Arc, Other Advocates Launch Modern Medicaid Alliance

Washington, D.C. – Despite the enormous societal and economic benefits offered by the modern Medicaid program, a lack of dialogue about the true value of the program drives misperceptions relating to it.  Today, an alliance of more than two dozen national advocacy organizations formally launched with the aim of educating the public and policy makers  about the Medicaid program and its importance for the more than 70 million Americans covered by it.

The Arc joined advocates for low-income Americans, children’s health and well-being, people with mental illness, people with disabilities, health care providers, and business organizations today in announcing their participation in the Modern Medicaid Alliance (MMA). A list of the members of the Modern Medicaid Alliance can be found here.

From lowering health care costs to delivering better health outcomes for beneficiaries, Medicaid keeps our nation healthier and enables more citizens to have access to affordable, quality healthcare so they can care for their families and be productive in the workplace. The largest health care program in the country has also become a proven laboratory for innovation as cash-strapped states have sought solutions for difficult population health issues. Despite its positive impact on tens of millions of people and America as a whole, the need for greater awareness among policymakers and the public about the value of our investment in it remains high.

“Medicaid is the backbone of our system of services and supports for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and the critical role it plays in providing long term services and supports is often overlooked.  We welcome the opportunity to be a voice for the vital role the program plays in providing health care and assisting people with I/DD to live and work in the community,” said Marty Ford, Senior Executive Officer for Public Policy at The Arc.

The Arc Responds to Connecticut Court Ruling on Education and Access for Children with Disabilities

Washington, DC – Recently, Judge Thomas Moukawsher of the Connecticut State Superior Court released a sweeping ruling on school funding that could have dire, negative consequences on students with disabilities, particularly students with intellectual and/or developmental as well as behavioral and emotional disabilities.

The case, Connecticut Coalition for Justice in Education Funding v. Rell, was initiated in 2005 and challenged the state constitutionality of Connecticut’s pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade education finance system, claiming that the state was inadequately funding the poorest and lowest- performing districts. Judge Moukawsher held that “Connecticut is defaulting on its constitutional duty” to give all children an adequate education and ordered the state to make far-reaching changes regarding how schools are financed, which students are eligible to graduate from high school, and how teachers are paid and evaluated, among others. The judge noted that the state “has left rich school districts to flourish and poor school districts to flounder,” thereby failing to provide children with a “fair opportunity for an elementary and secondary school education.” Judge Moukawsher did not mandate any particular policies for the state to adopt in light of the ruling – rather, he ordered the attorney general’s office to submit plans within 180 days to solve the problems outlined in the decision.

While this decision may appear to assist vulnerable students in Connecticut, Judge Moukawsher also noted within the decision that children with certain “profound” disabilities be denied a public education, erroneously stating that: “The call is not about whether certain profoundly disabled children are entitled to a ‘free appropriate public education.’ It is about whether schools can decide in an education plan for a covered child that the child has a minimal or no chance for education, and therefore the school should not make expensive, extensive, and ultimately pro-forma efforts…no case holds otherwise, and this means that extensive services are not always required.” The state has appealed the ruling to the Connecticut Supreme Court.

The Arc, a leading national disability organization, and The Arc of Connecticut, released the following statement on the ruling:

“While the disability community has won many important, hard fought battles when it comes to kids with disabilities accessing a free and appropriate public education, this ruling demonstrates we have a long way to go to ensure discrimination in our education system is a distant memory.

“The language of this ruling turns back the clocks on how society places value in the lives of people with disabilities. It ignores all the examples of people with disabilities being told they can’t do this, or won’t be able to do that, who proved the experts wrong. If we followed this narrow view and didn’t invest in the education of all kids, we would be missing out on the contributions every single person can make in their community. I’m glad the state is appealing this ruling, and The Arc of Connecticut will be a leader in making sure that all kids with disabilities are treated fairly under the law,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

“This ruling is deeply disturbing on two levels,” said Leslie Simoes, the executive director of The Arc of Connecticut. “First, the court ignored the law. Though it was common to deny an education to children with disabilities in the past, federal law has entitled all children with disabilities- not just some children- to a free and appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment for more than 40 years. Attempting to differentiate children deserving of an education by the severity of their disability would be both arbitrary and lead to creating perverse incentives for states.

“Second, I categorically reject the court’s premise that the only way one group of struggling students can progress is to take services away from others who face enormous challenges. Our aim must be to move forward together, not to benefit some by leaving others behind. That is not only illegal, it denies those children their basic human right to live as full members of their community.”

 

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

The Arc Welcomes Long Overdue Initial Zika Prevention Funding Package

Washington, DC – After months of delay, late last night Congress finally approved and sent to President Obama’s desk a funding package for Zika prevention. Some women infected with Zika while pregnant give birth to babies with severely disabling brain injury, including microcephaly.  Many of The Arc’s more than 650 chapters provide supports and services to families and people with a range of disabilities, including significant disabilities. Since 2015, more than 23,000 cases of Zika have been confirmed in the U.S. and its territories, with over 2,000 of these among pregnant women.

“After months of inaction, we are relieved that Congress finally approved funding to address this public health threat. These resources will allow us to slow the spread of Zika until a treatment or vaccine can be developed.

Unfortunately, women will continue to have to wait for years to know the full range of developmental delays that their Zika infections have caused in their children.  Affected children and their families then will enter our nation’s woefully inadequate system for providing services and supports for the millions of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in communities across the country. The Arc continues to educate Members of Congress and the public about the importance of our lifeline programs, Medicaid and Social Security, for people with disabilities and their families,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

In February, the White House asked for $1.9 billion for Zika vaccine development, better testing, and mosquito reduction.  With no action taken by Congress, in April the White House transferred $589 million from money set aside to fight Ebola and other problems to work on Zika prevention efforts.  With that funding dwindling, Congress was at an impasse all summer and into September over the funding level and extraneous items some were attempting to include in the bill that Congress couldn’t agree on. The approved legislation includes $1.1 billion for this effort.

The Arc has long held a position on the prevention of intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), supporting our national efforts to continue to investigate the causes, reduce the incidence and limit the consequences of I/DD through education, clinical and applied research, advocacy, and appropriate supports. We firmly believe that prevention activities do not diminish the value of any individual, but rather strive to maximize independence and enhance quality of life for people with I/DD.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

The Arc Responds to Florida Supreme Court’s Decision to Vacate Death Sentence for Freddie Lee Hall in Florida

Washington, DC – The Arc released the following statement following news that the Supreme Court of Florida reversed the circuit court’s order in the case Hall v. Florida, a death penalty case concerning the definition of intellectual disability (ID) that Florida uses in deciding whether an individual with that disability is protected by the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Atkins v. Virginia. With this decision Freddie Lee Hall will be taken off death row and his sentence will be reduced to life in prison. In 2002, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled in the Atkins v. Virginia case that executing inmates with ID is unconstitutional as it violates the Eighth Amendment ban on cruel and unusual punishment.

“Today the Supreme Court of Florida showed its commitment to ensuring justice for individuals with intellectual disability. This decision is an affirmation of years of legal advocacy on behalf of Mr. Hall.

“With the original sentencing in Hall’s case Florida was violating the Supreme Court’s Atkins v. Virginia ruling and we are pleased to see justice finally being served. Our hope is that Florida’s decision will serve as guidepost to other states that have similar cases involving defendants with intellectual disability. While we are pleased with Florida’s decision, we also think of other individuals who were unjustly denied Atkins protections and sentenced to death, individuals like Warren Hill, executed in Georgia last year, despite the protections of the Atkins decision.

“The Arc remains committed to fighting for the rights of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and we will continue our legal advocacy work to make sure that the Supreme Court ruling on this issue is followed in jurisdictions across the country,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc has participated in a number of cases on this issue before the Supreme Court including Atkins v. Virginia. The Arc’s amicus (friend-of-the-court) brief was cited by the Justices in support of its ruling that the Constitution protects all defendants with ID. On December 23, 2013, The Arc submitted an amicus brief for the Hall v. Florida case.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, Autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, Cerebral Palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of nearly 700 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Voting Independently With A Disability Is Possible

When I became old enough to vote, I didn’t think I could because I can’t write due to having cerebral palsy (CP). A few years later, I was in an independent living program which taught me many skills that I needed to know in order to live on my own, and one thing I learned is that I had the right to ask a polling person to assist me in filling out my voting ballot. This helped reduce my fears around voting. So, when the next election came around, my boyfriend– Juan, who also lives with CP and needed help writing– and I decided to go vote for the first time. It took us two and a half hours because there was a long line, then when we finally made it to the front of the line, we had to wait for one polling assistants to become free to help us (one at a time). We both were dissatisfied with the process because we didn’t view it as very fair. We felt uncomfortable because we weren’t taken to a private area, so anyone could have overheard our vote. Plus, we were also discouraged when we realized that even if we were taken to a private area, our vote would never be truly private because the person who assisted us would know how we voted. This discouraged us from voting again for several years.

Then, in 2010, I got a job working with the Coalition of Texans with Disabilities. One of the first projects they had me working on was about voting and trying to get more people with disabilities to get out and exercise their right to vote. While working on the project, I learned about a pair of jelly switches– big round buttons that could be plugged into accessible voting machines to help with the process of voting. These buttons are for people with disabilities who don’t possess good dexterity and fine motor control. These buttons can be placed anywhere needed for them to be accessible. One button allows the voter to move throughout the ballot, while the other was to make selections. I discovered these were perfect for me because I could operate them with my feet. I was excited to be able to cast my ballot by myself and in private!

The next time elections rolled around, there were accessible machines at almost every polling place and I was anxious to put what I had learned into practice. So I went into my polling place and told them I wanted to use the jelly buttons to cast my own ballot. They got the polling person who had been trained on the adaptive equipment. She hooked up the buttons, then we figured out that the best place for me to put them was on the foot pedals of my wheelchair. Then, I spent the next 20-30 minutes casting my own private ballot. When I finished, they were as excited for me as I was for myself. As I walked out of the building with my ‘I Voted’ sticker on me, I had tears in my eyes– as I do right now– because it meant that much to me.


Susie Angel has an Associate’s Degree in Communications from Austin Community College and a Bachelor’s in Magazine Journalism from the University of Texas at Austin. She has worked as a secretary/office manager for several years and has experience as a job developer/ job coach for people with disabilities. Susie joined Coalition of Texans with Disabilities (CTD) as a VISTA in 2010 and joined the staff as a part-time employee in 2012. She edits and writes for the monthly e-newsletter, co-coordinates Pen 2 Paper, and heads up CTD’s research department. She sits on the advisory boards for SafePlace and the Austin Interfaith Inclusion Network. Susie was raised in Boston and California before moving to Austin in 1987. Her hobbies include creative writing, dramatic performance, mixed-ability dancing, modelling, and watching baseball with her other half.

The Arc Baton Rouge Flood Impact August 2016

The Arc BR flood 1
Barry A. Meyer, Executive Director

The catastrophic flooding that inundated the greater Baton Rouge and surrounding areas has had a devastating impact on the children, adults and families we serve, as well as our staff. We are still trying to locate some of them.

Fortunately, we located all of the individuals that we directly support who were forced to evacuate from their own homes or apartments.  All of them have been moved out of shelters and into shared housing with others who were not flooded. Many of those who live with their families were also forced to evacuate. Some are with other family members that were spared.  Some are in area hotels. Others were able to return home once the water subsided. Unfortunately, there are areas that are still flooded. Many staff members have also suffered tremendous losses.

We have yet to locate 2 individuals with I/DD and 11 Direct Support Professionals. Of those we have contacted, 60 were forced to evacuate and lost their homes to the flood.  Most also lost their vehicles.

Three of our program locations totaling almost 41,000 sq. ft. were flooded;

  • Children’s Services Center, the offices and team meeting place for Early Intervention Special Instructors, OTs, PTs and Speech Therapists.
  • Metro Enterprises – Prescott Road 1 of 2 locations where crews and enclaves meet before heading to their work site, for others to meet for community volunteer activities, and where our day habilitation services are provided.
  • The Respite Care Center for children and adults who are in need of short term residence in a home environment, to relieve family from continual care or in an emergency including instances of abuse or neglect.

The Arc BR flood 3The Arc BR flood 4These buildings are located in areas that were mapped as being “safe” from flooding. Like thousands of individuals and businesses in “safe” areas, we did not have flood insurance on these buildings. The maximum water damage coverage we do have is $25,000 per event for ALL property. Repairs and recovery of the Respite Center is a priority because it will provide temporary housing not only for those people we support who are guest in others homes, but for additional folks with I/DD who are still in shelters. We received one estimate for repairs for the Respite Center – the smallest of the three flooded facilities – of $167,000.

The Arc BR flood 2We also lost four mini-vans, a full-size automobile used for community inclusion outings, a box truck used to haul paper for shredding contracts and other recyclable goods, and a fork lift.

We are overwhelmed by the kind words and encouragement from our friends and extended family of The Arc. Cliff Doescher, the Executive Director of The Arc Greater New Orleans, contacted us almost immediately, offering staff volunteers to help with cleanup and repair efforts. A group of ten will be heading here this Friday and a second group of twelve will be in Baton Rouge next Tuesday.

In a traumatic event of this scale, it is important to reestablish “normal” routines as quickly as possible – for the sake of the children, the adults and their families.  As soon as the waters receded, EarlySteps staff resumed seeing children in their homes or other natural settings.  Metro staff worked quickly to re-arrange the space at Dallas Drive to make room and accommodate employees and day services clients from the Prescott Road facility. Teamwork and flexibility have minimized our down-time and expedited resumption of services when and wherever possible.

For those who have “lost everything” returning to normal is a long-term goal. A place to sleep is a more urgent priority.  I had a chance to visit with many of the staff and individuals we support. I asked, “What would be one thing we can do to help you right now?” Tina thought for only a few seconds and replied, “A mattress, so I could have some place to sleep.”

TIM lived with supports in the same home where he grew up. His sister had remodeled it for him recently, updated with bright new furnishings and total accessibility for his wheelchair. By Friday evening streets in Tim’s neighborhood were flooded, and he and Christy, his day worker, could not get out. With the help of the National Guard they were evacuated by boat to a nearby church shelter on Saturday. As the water continued to rise, they were moved to a high school shelter, where they didn’t stay dry for very long. Christy had to push the wheelchair through the water up to a t-building which was on higher ground. She stood in the water for several hours while holding Tim’s wheelchair on the ramp above the water. When the next boat came they were brought to safety at Central Middle School, where they would finally be dry for the night.

The middle school was a nice facility. There were 2 gyms which allowed shelter volunteers to better accommodate elderly folks and those with disabilities in separate areas; however, all the shelter’s cots were already occupied by other evacuees. Tim got very little sleep sitting upright in his wheelchair. Sunday morning he was moved to a cot, and it goes without saying, he fell fast asleep.

In such a chaotic situation, tracking people down between shelters was no easy task; many people were without cell phone service, and land lines and other utilities were failing by the minute. On top of that… Sunday morning brought the workers’ 4th shift change that had NOT happened. Tim’s Friday daytime DSW was still by his side, caring for him, and unable to get back to be with her own family. They had been completely surrounded by floodwaters with no way in or out.

Amy, Supported Living Program Director, had not given up on finding the two and finally tracked them down at Central Middle School. By this time the water had receded and vehicles were able to drive closer to the school. Amy contacted Barry, Executive Director, to go with her to pick them up. They decided to take Barry’s Jeep because it was several inches higher from the ground than Amy’s van.

Words could not describe the excitement on their faces when Tim and Christy spotted Amy and Barry walking into the gym. But after spending time together and becoming new friends, the shelter volunteers hated to see them go. So what, right? They grabbed the garbage bag with Tim’s personal items, thanked the volunteers, said their good-byes and headed for the door.

Unfortunately The Arc’s Respite Care Center had been flooded, so THE go-to shelter in an emergency or crisis situation was not an option. Right away Amy thought of Lynette, who lives in her own place with full supports. Some might say Lynette is non-verbal, but there was no doubt of her welcoming reply when asked if she would be willing to share her home with Tim, indefinitely! She even volunteered her own bed, equipped with side rail and certain to be the most important amenity to Tim. Even in the comfort of his own home, he rarely slept all night. Sunday. . . Tim slept all night.

BETH AND DONNA each lived on their own in the same apartment complex. They were already friends and occasionally went on outings together. On Saturday when the waters rose from the streets and then into the parking areas of the complex, it seeped into Donna’s home first. No worries… her DSW checked in with Beth’s worker who agreed they should head there. It didn’t take long for the water to rise into Beth’s apartment. They called every single emergency number they could find, and learned that first responders and volunteers were already evacuating the complex, building by building. Beth’s apartment was close to the end of the property, and they waited outside, all night, for their turn to be rescued.

Sunday morning brought with it a rescue boat. Unfortunately one could not choose where they wished to be dropped off. Unloading areas were at random places of highest ground, along a street or other high pavement. Now safe on dry land, the ladies were stranded.

Arc BR Supervisor, Natalie, was relieved to get their call for help. In the past she had worked in a neighborhood near Beth and Donna’s apartment complex, and knew her way around the back roads. She found a route that was not under water, and was able to drive right up to where they stood at the side of the road. She drove them to Mary’s house – another friend in supported Living – who had not been flooded.

Fortunately Mary has a 3rd bedroom in her Habitat for Humanity home that she shares with a housemate. She welcomed Beth and Donna as temporary guests; they share a bedroom, and when possible, the 4 of them share workers.

DURING NORMAL TIMES there are more than enough hotel rooms in and around Baton Rouge to accommodate tourists, business travelers, sports enthusiasts and concert-goers. Several employees of The Arc’s Metro Enterprises Employment Program realized the magnitude of flooding and number of people displaced when they began their search for hotel rooms. Saturday night Byron’s mother finally found a vacant room for 2 nights in Eunice, LA; a small town almost 80 miles away. For 2 days they drove from there into Baton Rouge to begin the cleanup phase of their flood-damaged home, and then back again at night.

Their search for another vacant room took them 110 miles away from home to Alexandria, which is considered central Louisiana. Hopefully Byron and his family have found a place to stay that’s closer to home. And much like tens of thousands of other folks, they continue to work together – gutting and cleaning what’s left of their homes – and determined to rebuild and recover.

 

Stakeholders Endorse Lawsuit Challenging the GNETS Program and Hail It as the Brown VS. Board of Education for Students with Disabilities

On August 23, 2016, The U.S. Department of Justice filed a lawsuit against the state of Georgia alleging that its treatment and segregation of students with disabilities in the Georgia Network for Educational and Therapeutic Support Program violates the Americans with Disabilities Act. For years, the Georgia Coalition for Educational Equity has been working vigorously to protect the right of students with disabilities to receive an equal education alongside their non-disabled peers. As members of the Coalition, The Arc of Georgia and The Arc of the United States strongly support this lawsuit.  Read more in the Coalition’s press release here.

Atlanta, Georgia, August 23rd — The Georgia Coalition for Educational Equality (GCEE) strongly supports today’s filing by the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) of a federal lawsuit challenging the illegal segregation and unequal and inferior education provided to the thousands of students with disabilities in Georgia’s Network for Educational and Therapeutic Services (GNETS).  The GCEE is a broad coalition of disability, education, civil rights, juvenile justice, child welfare, self-advocate, and parent organizations advocating for a complete transformation of the GNETS program to provide supports to help all students succeed in their neighborhood schools.

In July 2015, DOJ found that Georgia is illegally segregating students with behavior-related disabilities in the GNETS program, where they are denied opportunities to learn with their peers who are non-disabled and provided inferior educational opportunities.  The GNETS is a statewide network created in 1970 that consists of two dozen centers serving about 5,000 children with at least $70 million in state and federal funds, plus additional locally- and federally-funded services. According to the letter, “[t]he State’s support and development of GNETS has effectively created one placement option for many students with behavior-related disabilities to the exclusion of all others.” The DOJ also found the network’s facilities to be “inferior,” often outdated, and lacking such basic infrastructure as central air conditioning, as well as educational resources such as science labs and libraries, and extracurricular facilities such as gyms and playgrounds. The Atlanta Journal Constitution’s May 2016 investigation found that Georgia’s public schools assign a vastly disproportionate number of black students to “psychoeducational” programs, segregating them not just by disability but also by race. The paper found that 54 percent of students in Georgia’s psychoeducational programs are African-American, compared with 37 percent in all public schools statewide.

“The GCEE has maintained that the Justice Department’s letter of findings created an opportunity for the State to transform their education system into one that supports students in their neighborhood schools. We are disappointed that the State has opted to defend the GNETS rather than work towards the full integration of students with disabilities. The Arc Georgia fully supports this lawsuit and will continue to be involved in the GCEE coalition to ensure the state of Georgia provides a full range of supports for students with behavior-related disabilities in our neighborhood schools,” said Stacey Ramirez, the State Director of The Arc Georgia.

“While we hoped for a voluntary resolution to transform the provision of behavioral-related educational support for students with disabilities and avoid litigation, we strongly support the decision by the Department of Justice to file their lawsuit. The continued segregation of students with disabilities is a shameful and illegal position for the State of Georgia to defend,” said Leslie Lipson, an attorney with the Georgia Advocacy Office, the independent Protection and Advocacy System for people with disabilities in Georgia, a leader in the GCEE.

“Segregating students with disabilities not only is illegal but also leads to poor results,” said Alison Barkoff, Director of Advocacy for the Center for Public Representation in Washington, D.C. and a leader of the GCEE.  “Georgia has a choice: engage in litigation likely to result in a court order to desegregate, or work with the Justice Department and stakeholders to develop a settlement that incorporates best practices and ends illegal and unnecessary segregation of students with disabilities.”

The GCEE hopes that this lawsuit – which seeks to vindicate the right of students with disabilities to an equal education alongside their non-disabled peers – will be the Brown v. Board of Education for Georgia’s students with disabilities.

 

A Conversation with Dr. Brian Armour About Oral Health of People with and Without Disabilities

Patient - teeth checkBrian Armour, PhD is an economist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). He has spent over 15 years in health services research, including work on helping design the CDC Disability and Health Data (http://dhds.cdc.gov/). We asked Brian to discuss findings from the study he led, entitled “A Profile of State-level Differences in the Oral Health of People with and Without Disabilities, in the U.S., in 2004” (Armour BS, Swanson M, Waldman HB, Perlman SP. Public Health Rep. 2008 Jan-Feb;123(1):67-75).

Why did you want to study state-level differences in oral health of people with disabilities?
While there have been disability-specific studies about oral health, no state-level analysis of the oral health of people with disabilities was available. We wanted to assess the oral health of people with disabilities in each state.

Oral health is as important as other types of health care; and good oral health improves general health, self-esteem, communication, nutrition, and quality of life.

What did you discover?
In the year we observed, people with disabilities were less likely than people without disabilities to visit a dentist or dental clinic. They were more likely to have experienced tooth loss.

Our study showed very different results among states. People with disabilities from Mississippi were much less likely than people with disabilities in Connecticut to have visited the dentist or dental clinic in the last year. Only four percent of people with disabilities in the District of Columbia reported having tooth loss as opposed to almost 19 percent of people with disabilities in Kentucky.

What does this mean for people with disabilities and their families?
It is important for everyone, especially for people with disabilities, to practice good oral health habits, like brushing their teeth regularly and flossing. People who need help finding good oral health habits can visit the “Oral Health” section of the CDC website.

Sometimes, people with disabilities – particularly intellectual or developmental disabilities – need assistance from their families and caregivers to help them practice good oral health. If caregivers need tips on how to promote good oral heath, they can check out “Dental Care Every Day: A Caregiver’s Guide” from the National Institute on Health.

A Conversation with Brian Armour About Disability Prevalence Among Healthy Weight, Overweight, and Obese Adults

Patient-assessors-weist-measure

Brian Armour, PhD is an economist with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  He has spent over 15 years in health services research, including work on helping design the CDC Disability and Health Data System (http://dhds.cdc.gov/). We asked Brian to discuss findings from the study he led, entitled Estimating Disability Prevalence Among Adults by Body Mass Index: 2003–2009 National Health Interview Survey” (Armour BS, Courtney-Long E, Campbell VA, Wethington HR. Prev Chronic Dis. 2012; 9: E178. Published online 2012 December 27).

In your article, you assess the number of people who are obese, overweight, or healthy weight and who report having a disability. Why do you think it is important to look at whether people who have weight issues also have disabilities?
This information can help public health programs better recognize the need to design obesity prevention and treatment programs that are inclusive of people with disabilities.

What did you find out?
We found that 41 percent of US adults who are obese also reported having a disability. We also found out that mobility limitation was one of the most frequently reported types of disability among people who are obese.

What does this mean for public health programs?
Public health programs should be considering the needs of those with disabilities when designing their obesity prevention and treatment programs. There are many resources public health organizations can use to help make sure that they are thinking of the needs of people with disabilities. Two good resources include the “Disability Inclusion” section on the CDC’s website as well as the Inclusive Community Health Implementation Package (iChip) program run by the National Center on Health and Physical Activity for People with Disabilities (NCHPAD).

Do you have any recommendations for people with disabilities on how to maintain their weight and avoid becoming obese?
Everyone is different, but it is important that we all are physically active, eat better, and talk to a doctor when not feeling well! People who need help keeping a healthy weight can check out the “Healthy Weight” section of the CDC website for tools to use to help maintain a healthy weight.

Is there anything else you want to say?
Identifying health issues that people with disabilities experience is important, but we also need to help improve the health of people with disabilities by promoting inclusion. This means making sure that people with disabilities are included in all aspects of community life—in our gyms, healthy eating programs, walking paths, transportation and more.