Thank You! You Mean the World to The Arc

This year at The Arc’s National Convention we asked the over 800 attendees, “What Does The Arc Mean to You?” and the response blew us away! With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we here at The Arc have been contemplating the same question and our resounding answer is YOU!

The Arc is incomplete without you and your dedication to our mission to ensure that those with intellectual and developmental disabilities live a fully inclusive life. You breathe life into our mission and together we will be successful.

From the board and staff of the National office of The Arc, please accept our sincere and deep appreciation of YOU and your ongoing support of our cause nationally, statewide and locally.

We could not have accomplished all that we did this year without you, so this holiday season we wanted to THANK YOU for your commitment, support and generosity to The Arc.

From all of us here at The Arc, we wish you a safe and happy Thanksgiving.

Case Dismissed: National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability Provides Critical Support to Bring Justice in Illinois

The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD) fields calls from all over the country regarding people with disabilities in the criminal justice system. From a first encounter with a police officer to their time behind bars, the horrors people with disabilities regularly face are shocking and appalling. All too often, it’s simply a blatant disregard for human rights that set off a chain of events that deny people with I/DD justice. And the fact that this continues to occur in 2014 is unacceptable. However, every so often, a case comes to our attention and events unfold in a way that looks a little bit more like “justice.”

Pathways to Justice - First Contact

A few months ago, an Illinois family contacted NCCJD to search for assistance. Their son, Jack1, who has intellectual and developmental disabilities, had been charged with felony assault at the group home he had recently moved into. After a verbal altercation between Jack and another resident, a third resident called the police. Jack was arrested and, in the process, struck a police officer who grabbed him by the hoodie from behind as he attempted to exit the situation. The officer threatened to taze him if he did not cooperate while they had Jack on the ground trying to handcuff him.

Pathways to Justice - Jail

Jack spent 24 hours in jail without support or access to his medication. His parents called and spoke to the supervisor of the Adult Detention Center to inform them of Jack’s needs. Jack’s parents were told that their son should be able to tell the nurse himself about his needs and pharmacy information. Jack was unable to do that, leaving him at risk and without access to his medications. Jack was read his Miranda rights without assistance and he did not understand what he was agreeing to. His parents were never called while he was jailed.

Jack was assigned a public defender the day he went to bond court. The judge initially put a large bond on Jack because he struck a police officer. However, the public defender argued for low-no bail because of Jack’s disability. The judge reduced bond from $30,000 to $10,000, after asking Jack’s parents if they could afford the $1,000 on a $10,000. Jack was out on bond when, as part of the legal process, his competency was evaluated and he was found unfit to stand trial. The state attorney refused to dismiss charges and the public defender was forced to send Jack for a sanity evaluation—which was completed by the same state appointed psychologist that earlier saw him for competency. Jack was found not sane at the time of the incident.

Pathways to Justice - Trial

These sets of circumstances are all too common for people with disabilities, and are a great injustice. Thankfully, Jack had a public defender that insisted upon a competency evaluation and a sanity evaluation. And Jack’s parents contacted NCCJD and The Arc of Illinois Life Span Program looking for resources. Jack’s mother found NCCJD through The Arc’s main webpage and used the “Request Assistance” form to e-mail NCCJD. Working together with family members, Jack’s service providers, The Arc of Illinois Life Span Program, and NCCJD, advocates were able to put together a personalized justice plan for Jack. The plan outlined resources and possible alternatives for assisting Jack in the community and the plan was supported by the Director of Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Developmental Disabilities. The report was submitted to Jack’s public defender, who used the report to get the case dismissed. Because the public defender was able to demonstrate that Jack had appropriate services in the community and that there were additional supports being made available as needed, the case was dismissed.

Jack was arrested in mid-March of 2014 and the case was finally dismissed in mid-October. There were almost monthly hearings throughout the ordeal, causing a great amount of stress to everyone involved. When the case was finally dismissed, the family felt like Jack had been misunderstood by the legal system from the beginning. They believe the court did not understand the difference between mental illness and developmental disability, because the judge often spoke to Jack as though he had a normal IQ but was experiencing mental illness. The parents continually questioned the public defender as to whether the judge and state attorney were aware that Jack had a developmental disability. Despite all the shortcomings in this case, the public defender took the necessary steps to ensure dismissal of the case, and the Judge was open to reading the personalized justice plan and making a dismissal.

When asked how he felt when he was arrested, Jack said:

“My heart was racing 290 because I was in the back of a squad car, handcuffed.” [At the police station] “I pretty much felt like a nervous wreck.” [When I went to the Adult Detention Center] “I felt sick to my stomach because I was around people I didn’t know.” [A couple of days before court] “I felt scared and nervous.” [At court] “I felt scared I was going to jail.” [On the last day of court] “the judge calmly talked to me and explained what would happen the next time I got in trouble.” [When the court case was dismissed] “I was still edgy.” “I feel more calmly now” [that it is over.]

The family said of their experience:

“Although this experience was excruciatingly painful for us, there was a positive outcome. The experience has helped our family realize there is work to be done in this area to make sure this never happens to anyone else. We are on board with helping NCCJD and The Arc of Illinois in any way we can to get legislation changed and the first responders, courts, etc. trained in handling the I/DD population. This needs to happen in all communities across the U.S. with group homes. NCCJD is a great national center to dispense this information so that each state/community doesn’t have to keep reinventing the wheel, which would make this happen even faster! We would also like to thank Leigh Ann Davis and Kathryn Walker for their time and efforts. Leigh Ann took time out of a business trip to make contact with me to make sure information was being shared. This is what we need — go to people!!!”

Deb Fornoff, Director of The Arc of Illinois, Illinois Life Span Program said:

“The staff of The National Center on Criminal Justice and Developmental Disability provided support, information, and connection with experienced legal advocates who provided the information we needed to put together a Personal Justice Plan. This Plan was assembled with tremendous collaboration between this man’s family and their son’s service providers, and facilitated by the staff from Illinois Life Span. It provided much needed information to the court about this individual and the services and supports in place and available to him. The plan included details that were otherwise very difficult to address. Thank you, Leigh Ann Davis and Kathryn Walker for your time, your help, and your ongoing commitment to alleviating the injustice that currently exists for individuals with ID/DD in our legal system nationwide.”

NCCJD would not be the resource it is without the dedication of advocates like Deb and families like Jack’s. To anyone with a criminal justice and disability issue, please request assistance! For more information on Personalized Justice Plans, view NCCJD’s archived webinar.

To find a list of resources by state or submit a resource, please visit our state by state map.

1 Names have been changed to protect the privacy of those involved.

Fall Is Racing Season!

If you’re a runner or have any runner friends you might have heard them talk about fall being race season. To many runners, the crisp autumn weather is considered the “perfect” running weather and a lot of people head out to local parks, community centers, etc. to take part in the fun of running a race – whether it’s a 5k (3.1 miles) or a marathon.

CDC’s Vital Signs earlier this year sent out shocking statistics that half of all adults with disabilities get no aerobic exercise at all and are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke and diabetes. For those that are able, running/walking is a great way to get in daily exercise without having to have a special place to go or expensive equipment to use. The only real equipment that is needed is proper shoes and comfortable workout clothing.

While running may be hard for some to start off with walking can actually provide many of the same health benefits as running without all the impact that running endures on the body. Running and walking are both great cardiovascular activities that help to build muscle and endurance, make your heart stronger, and help relieve high blood pressure. They also burn calories which aid in weight loss and reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes.

While running/walking is a very individualized sport that you don’t need anyone else to do it with, it can actually be a very social activity as well. A walking club is a great way to stay active and socialize with friends at the same time. All over the country are runs and walks of various distances that anyone can take part in, regardless of if they have an intellectual disability or not. Now-a-days more and more races are taking the initiative to specifically reach out to individuals with intellectual disabilities to be a part of the action. Girls on the Run (GOTR) is a 12 week running program for girls ranging from 3rd to 8th grade with the goal of finishing a sponsored 5k race at the end of the program. GOTR in Columbia has reached out to The Arc of Midlands to work with them to recruit individuals to join in one of their upcoming races. The Spartan Race is an off-road race combined with different obstacles throughout the course and has grown significantly more popular in past years. The Spartan Race has recently modified their course in certain locations to develop a Special Needs Obstacle Course so that individuals with intellectual disabilities can participate as well.

Completing a race is more than just doing the miles. In addition to the many physical benefits from running or walking there is also a great sense of accomplishment and pride that comes from crossing the finish line filled with the support of spectators cheering you on. It helps to boost overall self-esteem and mood, which is what draws many people back to do another race. Many races give out shirts and some even give medals to everyone who finishes, which is a great bonus to all the hard work and training that has been accomplished.

A popular fun race to do every year is a Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving Day morning. It’s a great way to get the entire family and friends out to be active and do an activity that includes individuals of all ages and fitness levels. It’s also a great way to burn some calories before that big turkey dinner later in the day! So this fall think about joining a running/walking group in your community or start one with friends and family to help increase your fitness level. To find local races in your area, check out the race calendar. Learn more ways to stay healthy and active by checking out The Arc’s HealthMeet page.

New Congress: Opportunities for New Champions

The midterm elections are over and many wonder how they will impact the disability community in the 114th Congress. And with all of the 24/7 news coverage, it can be hard to know what really matters for us. Here is a quick synopsis to make it easier:

  • Republicans gained control of the Senate and further strengthened their majority in the House. However, they will need to work with Democrats to pass legislation which the President will sign for it to become law in the next two years.
  • Party majorities are really important, mostly because they determine control of the Congressional agenda and calendar and the Committees where most of the work gets done.
  • The three committees in the Senate that are most important to people with I/DD are the Appropriations Committee, the Finance Committee and the Health, Education, Labor & Pensions (HELP) Committee. The Appropriations Committee determines funding for federal agencies and most discretionary programs. The Finance Committee handles funding and program details for Social Security, Medicaid, and other entitlement programs. The HELP Committee handles most federal programs related to health, education, and employment.
  • The Committee chairpersons (from the majority party) determine a committee’s priorities based on their interests, sense of national needs, and political judgment.
  • Senators Richard Shelby (R-AL), Orrin Hatch (R-UT) and Lamar Alexander (R-TN), are expected to become the next chairmen of the Appropriations, Finance, and HELP Committees, respectively. However, chairmanships won’t be finalized until early 2015.

Every election provides an opportunity for The Arc to make new friends in Congress. In the coming weeks and months, we will be engaging our vast network in reaching out to their new Members of Congress as well as those who continue to represent them. There are new faces and new dynamics in Congress, but our work remains the same.

Disability is a bipartisan issue and The Arc is a non-partisan organization. Disability affects all Americans in one way or another, sooner or later. We remember that landmark disability legislation like the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) became law through the support of Republican and Democratic Members of Congress alike. The Arc’s grassroots and chapters will do what we have always done. We work hard to get to know our elected officials and what they care and know about. We let them know what we care and know about. Most importantly, we let them know why we care. We tell them about our children, brothers, sisters, aunts, and uncles, neighbors, friends, etc. with I/DD. We let them know that we matter. We do this by paying attention to what they do and letting them know how we feel about it. We also do this by serving as a resource for them. If they try to do something that helps our community, we thank them.

The 114th Congress begins with the new year. We will need action at every level of The Arc to ensure that Members and staff are fully aware of the issues that are important to people with I/DD.

Affordable Care Act Update: What You Need to Know About Open Enrollment

If you are uninsured or looking for affordable health insurance, now is the time for you to look! During “open enrollment” you can purchase private health insurance through the marketplace in each state. Depending on your income, you may be eligible for assistance with your health insurance costs.

If you currently have insurance through the marketplace, you should look at your current plan and determine if it will continue to meet your needs, or select a better plan. If you do not take action, you will be automatically re-enrolled in your current plan. Re-enrollment provides an important opportunity to report any changes to your income.

2015 Open Enrollment
November 15, 2014
Open enrollment begins

December 15, 2014
Enroll before this date to have coverage January 1, 2015

February 15, 2015
Open enrollment ends

Why you should check your coverage:

  • Even if you like your health plan, new plans may be available and premiums or cost sharing may have changed since last year.
  • Even if your income has not changed, you could be eligible for more financial assistance.

If you have a disability or a health condition, pay attention to possible changes:

  • Are a broad range of health care providers included in the health plan’s network of providers?
  • Are there enough medical specialists in the network to meet your needs?
  • Are needed medications included in the plan’s list of covered drugs?
  • Is there adequate access to non-clinical, disability-specific services and supports?
  • Does the plan have service limits, such as caps on the number of office visits for therapy services?
  • Are mental health services covered to the same extent that other “physical” health benefits are covered?

Where to get help?

Health insurance can be complicated. If you or your family member needs assistance with understanding the options, healthcare.gov can help. This website has information about seeking assistance in local communities, explanations of health insurance terms, enrollment information and much more. There is also a 24-hour phone line for consumer assistance at 1-800-318-2596 to call for help.

Reproductive Health Education and Disability

Holding Hands

Image via Summer Skyes, used under a Creative Commons license

Reproductive and sexual health is a natural part of everyone’s life, but seems to be a very taboo topic for individuals with IDD. Reproductive and sexual education is taught in most public schools all across the United States, but not many programs are out there that explain it so that individuals with IDD can fully understand. If we truly want these individuals to live healthy fulfilling lives, educating them about sexual health should be included. Part of living a fulfilling life is to find healthy relationships that help you throughout life’s ups and downs and increase your emotional happiness, so why should that be any different for individuals with IDD.

While this topic can be uncomfortable and scary to discuss with those you care for, it is necessary. There are stereotypes out there regarding this topic such as – individuals with IDD are asexual or, just the opposite, that they have an over-sexual drive that they can’t control. These stereotypes are just not true. They go through the same feelings and emotions that any other individual may have, but with the subject commonly being overlooked they may not understand what is happening in their bodies or how to properly deal with those feelings in ways that are socially acceptable. Teaching behaviors like when and where certain behaviors are acceptable, proper communication, mutual consent between individuals, and how to be smart/safe about protecting yourself in different situations is essential. A lot of this type of education is about teaching appropriate behaviors while the rest is presenting the actual facts.

Many individuals with disabilities have girlfriends/boyfriends, so it is important for them to know the options about if they are going to act on their feelings how to be safe to prevent the transmission of STD’s and unplanned pregnancy (unless in confliction with religious, cultural beliefs, etc.). Since many of these individuals may have pre-existing medications they take, consulting their physician is the best way to figure out what method of prevention is appropriate and safe for each individual. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently stated that birth control and reproductive health should be integrated to become a part of regular care for individuals with IDD.

Another very key reason why this topic should be addressed is because individuals with IDD are at a much higher risk of being sexually assaulted. Statistics say that an alarming 80% of females and 30% of males with IDD are sexually abused during their lifetime. Learning about the difference between good and bad relationships and appropriate boundaries is essential. This type of education will help teach individuals that it is OK to speak up and say no in a situation they are not comfortable in and hopefully will help to prevent these types of incidents from occurring to individuals with IDD in the future.

While it’s a difficult subject for a lot of people, it’s important that we learn to properly teach individuals with IDD about reproductive and sexual health. The Arc’s HealthMeet project has a resource section that contains information about puberty, sexuality and more. Teaching individuals to understand their bodies and feelings will lead to healthier relationships in the future.

The Arc National Headquarters Announces New Strategic Alliance with District of Columbia Chapter

Mary Lou Meccariello

Mary Lou Meccariello

Washington, DC – The Arc of the District of Columbia (The Arc of DC), a mainstay in our nation’s capitol for nearly 65 years, has entered into a new strategic alliance with The Arc of the United States for management of the chapter that aims to enhance services for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in the District and create an incubator to develop best practices that can be replicated at chapters across the country in the future.

As longtime executive director Mary Lou Meccariello retires this fall, The Arc of DC’s board of directors is drawing on the expertise of The Arc’s national headquarters, also located in DC, to reposition the organization so that it can continue to be a preeminent service provider in the District and a powerful advocate for people with I/DD and their families. The chapter will continue to provide services in the DC Public Schools and employ people with I/DD performing contract services for the Federal government, while looking for new opportunities to expand its reach into the community.

2015 will mark 65 years of The Arc in the District of Columbia providing advocacy, supports and services for District residents. In order for the chapter to thrive going forward, and to support The Arc’s nearly 700 other chapters across the country, the national office staff will support The Arc of DC and develop innovative programs, services and supports at this chapter that can then be replicated throughout the network.

“With The Arc of DC in our backyard, this alliance presents a unique opportunity to find ways to serve and collaborate with people with intellectual and developmental disabilities for the next 65 years of our existence. Working with the chapter’s board of directors and with current and potential partners, we are looking forward to our new partnership to continue The Arc of DC’s reputation as a stellar community organization in the District,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

Meccariello, a native Washingtonian, is retiring with decades of professional experience in the field of disability, specializing in intellectual and developmental disabilities. She has played a key role in new program initiatives, service delivery, employer development and training, business development and legislative initiatives for people with I/DD in the city.

“I will miss The Arc and the people who embody our mission. I’m proud of the work we have done to support kids with I/DD in our schools and to employ people with disabilities in the community. We have served thousands and touched the lives of countless families. I look forward to watching the chapter thrive under this new strategic alliance with The Arc’s national office team,” said Meccariello.

“Mary Lou has been a tireless champion for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities in the District of Columbia, and she will be missed in her role within The Arc’s community, and in her capacity as a leader in the field in the District. I wish her the best in her retirement and thank her for her contributions to The Arc and the movement,” said Robert A. Andersen, Board President of The Arc of DC.

The Arc of DC can be reached at 202.636.2950 or on the web at http://www.arcdc.net.

Social Security Announces 2015 Cost of Living Increase for Beneficiaries

Today the Social Security Administration (SSA) announced a 1.7 percent cost-of-living increase for 2015. This modest increase will help preserve the buying power of Social Security benefits for nearly 64 million Americans, including many people with intellectual and developmental disabilities who receive benefits under our nation’s Social Security system.

According to SSA, the average monthly Social Security retirement benefit will increase by $22, from $1,306 in 2014 to $1,328 in 2013. The average monthly benefit for a Social Security “disabled worker” beneficiary will increase by $19, from $1,146 in 2014 to $1,165 in 2015.

Higher Medicare premiums will offset some of this increase. Changes in Medicare premiums for 2015 are available at Medicare.gov.

Additionally, SSA today announced increases in important thresholds for Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI), including:

  • Substantial Gainful Activity (SGA) level – The SGA for SSDI and SSI will increase from $1,070 per month to $1,090 per month for non-blind beneficiaries, and from $1,800 per month to $1,820 per month for blind beneficiaries.
  • Trial Work Period (TWP) – The TWP for SSDI will increase from $770 per month to $780 per month.
  • SSI Federal Payment Standard – The SSI federal payment standard will increase for an individual from $721 per month to $733 per month, and for a couple from $1,082 per month to $1,100 per month.
  • SSI Student Earned Income Exclusion – The SSI student earned income exclusion monthly limit will increase from $1,750 to $1,780, and the exclusion’s annual limit will increase from $7,060 to $7,180.

Annual cost-of-living adjustments ensure that Social Security beneficiaries do not see their buying power eroded by inflation. SSDI and SSI benefits are modest, averaging only about $1,145 per month for SSDI beneficiaries in the “disabled worker” category and $535 per month for SSI beneficiaries. Every penny and every dollar counts for people who rely on these benefits to get by.

The Arc strongly supports ensuring adequate benefit levels, and has joined other national organizations to oppose proposals to reduce these much-needed annual cost-of living increases. Subscribe to The Arc’s Capitol Insider for updates to learn how you can help make sure that Social Security, SSI, and other vital supports are there for people with I/DD.

The Arc’s 2014 National Convention – A Rousing Success!

Thank you to all of the nearly 800 attendees who made it New Orleans for The Arc’s 2014 National Convention. We could not have pulled it off without the support from chapter staff, self-advocates, family members, and professionals in our network. You all help us make this event bigger and better every year. A lot of work went into designing a program that featured not only, educational opportunities and inspiration, but also the passion that brings The Arc’s mission to life.

Ron Suskind

Author Ron Suskind speaks with a fan at his book signing

The convention got started with an engaging and captivating opening session. Award winning author Ron Suskind gave an impassioned speech about his new book, Life Animated, that details the remarkable journey that his family went on to reconnect with Owen, their son who is diagnosed with Autism. His speech brought the audience to tears and to their feet. Ron truly felt at home in The Arc’s network and spent more than an hour ensuring everyone who wanted to get their copy of his book signed, talk to him, or even give him a hug was given the chance.

Director of National Partnerships for Comcast/NBCUniversal, Fred Maahs, spoke about his desire to use his position to bridge corporations and the non-profits that service communities. Fred also shared his personal story of his physical disability and how it has impacted his career and the goals he has for Comcast.

Throughout the convention, attendees were able to network and interact with chapter staff, sponsors, and national initiative partners. Self- Advocates showcased their products and services in Entrepreneur Alley. This year featured our biggest showing of self-advocate entrepreneurs yet!

But the convention wasn’t all work and no play. Early risers were able to “Wake and Shake” with Eruption Athletics. Chris Engler and Joe Jelinski of Eruption Athletics (EA) are able to bring physical fitness to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities through informative work out sessions that feature the EA patented Volcano PADD and specially designed music to help inform participants of the specific exercises they have to complete.

With the convention going off without a hitch, everyone was thrilled to participate in the local host event, which involved a second line parade from the Marriott hotel to The Presbytere. Onlookers from neighboring stores and restaurants waved the parade on, as everyone marched through The French Quarter. At The Presbytere, everyone was able to enjoy jazz music, light refreshments, and view the ongoing exhibits on Hurricane Katrina and the history of Mardi Gras.

Peter and Nancy with Local Hosts Barry Meyer and Kelly Serrett

(L to R) Barry Meyer, The Arc of Baton Rouge; Nancy Webster, President of The Arc Board of Directors; Kelly Serrett, The Arc of Louisiana; Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc

One of the highlights for many of the participants were the powerful self-advocates who shared their stories. During the opening session Betty Williams spoke about the importance of employment for individuals with I/DD and how The Arc has given her meaningful employment. Shaun Bickley had the crowd cheering as he spoke about his personal journey as an individuals with autism. In fact, his speech was so powerful he has already been booked for another gig. And finally, during the closing general session, James Meadours, a nationally-known leader in self-advocacy and a sexual assault survivor shared his personal story about his journey through the criminal justice system and how his lo­cal chapter of The Arc supported him along the way

The convention drew to a close on Thursday afternoon with a sneak preview of the documentary film Children of the Dumping Ground, followed by a discussion with the filmmaker, Chip Warren, led by The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability Director, Leigh Ann Davis. Board President Nancy Webster presented the President’s Award to Dr. David Braddock for his research regarding long-term care, health promotion and disease prevention, and public policy toward people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, and Jim Ellis was presented with The Arc’s 2014 Advocacy Matters Award.

For more pictures visit The Arc’s Flickr, and don’t forget to share your photos as well!

Disability Advocates and Professionals Join in New Orleans for The Arc’s Annual Convention

2014 Convention ArtworkNew Orleans, LA  – Next week, The Arc’s National Convention will kick off in New Orleans, Louisiana with more than 800 disability advocates, professionals, and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) coming together to learn, forge connections, and energize the disability movement. This year’s theme focuses on three key goals– To Network, To Improve, and To Lead, three simple ideas that embody what The Arc stands for.  This year’s event will have a strong focus on criminal justice issues and the I/DD population.

“The Arc’s convention is a once a year chance to bring our network of nearly 700 chapters, their members and professionals, and people with disabilities together for a unique experience.  This year, in addition to our usual activities, we are turning a national spotlight to criminal justice and disability. The Arc has a long history of standing up for the rights of people with disabilities who find themselves involved in our legal system as victims, suspects, or offenders.

“We are thrilled to be honoring James Ellis, one of the leading lawyers in the disability community. Additionally, we are excited to have two award winning documentary film makers who will be exposing the difficulties facing children with intellectual disabilities involved in our criminal justice system,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

This three day event, which will take place at the New Orleans Marriott from September 30 – October 2, will include:

  • a keynote address by award-winning author Ron Suskind, whose latest book, Life Animated, A Story of Sidekicks, Heroes and Autism shares his family’s 20 year journey with their youngest son Owen’s autism;
  • an exciting and inspirational presentation from Fred Maahs, Director of National Partnerships for Comcast Corporation and Vice President of Comcast Foundation, that touches on his personal story, his commitment to community service, and the benefits of corporate/nonprofit partnerships;
  • honoring Dr. David Braddock with The Arc’s President’s Award for his lifetime of work for individuals with disabilities including his invaluable research regarding long-term care, health promotion and disease prevention, and public policy toward disability;
  • a panel discussion with documentary film makers Karen Grau and Chip Warren of Calamari Productions, and a sneak peek at their latest film, Children of the Dumping Ground;
  • honoring James Ellis, one of the greatest legal minds in the disability community; and
  • an exciting event hosted by The Arc of Louisiana and The Arc Baton Rouge, which includes a second line parade down the Chartres Street to the Presbytere, and a scheduled guest appearance by Lt. Governor Jay Dardenne.

“We are excited to serve as the local host committee for The Arc’s national convention. With so many changes at the federal and state level including managed care, the CMS home and community based setting rule, and wage and hour issues; I think the timing of this event in New Orleans is ideal. My hope is with hundreds of advocates and the leading experts in the disability community in our backyard, we will push forward with the necessary conversations to continue to move our state in the right direction,” said Kelly Serrett, Executive Director of The Arc Louisiana.

“The Arc’s national convention is the premier event for disability advocates in our network, and we are thrilled to have everyone in New Orleans this year.  Our program covers a number of key issues facing communities in Louisiana as well as nationally, from public policy to early intervention services for families with a loved one who has a disability. We are so pleased with the line-up of speakers that will be joining us, and look forward to showing our colleagues from across the country what our great state and the city of New Orleans has to offer,” said Barry Meyer, Executive Director of The Arc Baton Rouge.