Social Security – Attack Averted on Social Security, SSDI, and SSI in Senate Highway Bill

As noted in a statement by Marty Ford, Senior Executive Officer for Public Policy, The Arc applauds the Senate, which last week “…listened to the voices of people with disabilities and seniors, and removed a harmful proposal from legislation to reauthorize our nation’s highways, bridges, and public transportation system. The proposal would have partially funded the bill with cuts to Social Security, SSDI, and SSI. Social Security must not become a piggybank to pay for unrelated programs, no matter how important, and beneficiaries cannot afford any cuts to these modest but vital benefits. The Arc will remain vigilant and ready to fight back if any similar proposals arise as Congress continues to debate reauthorization of surface transportation legislation.”

Social Security – One Social Security Act Introduced

 

Last week, Representative Xavier Becerra (D-CA) and 22 original cosponsors introduced the One Social Security Act (H.R. 3150). The bill would avert a 19% across-the-board cut to Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) benefits at the end of 2016 by merging the Social Security Old-Age and Survivors Insurance (OASI) and Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Funds into a single Trust Fund. This new financial structure would better reflect Social Security’s already unified nature: a single payroll tax currently pays for an interrelated system of Social Security retirement, survivors, and disability benefits, and changes to one part of this system often impact all parts of the system. The Arc supports the One Social Security Act. More information about the bill is available online.

Social Security – 2015 Trustees Report Released

Last week, the Social Security Board of Trustees released “The 2015 Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance and Federal Disability Insurance Trust Funds.” The 2015 report finds that Social Security has large and growing reserves. In 2014 Social Security took in roughly $25 billion more (in total income and interest) than it paid out. Social Security’s reserves were $2.79 trillion at the beginning of 2015, and are projected to grow to $2.86 trillion at the beginning of 2020.  The long-term projections of the 2015 Trustees Report improved slightly from the 2014 Trustees Report, with exhaustion of the combined Trust Funds occurring one year later, in 2034. The 2015 Trustees Report also continues to project that the Disability Insurance (DI) trust fund by itself will be able to pay full benefits until the end of 2016, at which point if no action is taken the DI trust fund will be able to pay about 81 percent of scheduled benefits.

Rights – White House and Federal Agencies Host Official ADA Commemoration Events

Last week, the White House held a commemoration in honor of the 25th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). President Obama delivered a speech and noted that while there was certainly reason to celebrate, it is “also a chance to address the injustices that still linger, to remove the barriers that remain.” The President described efforts his administration has undertaken to remove these obstacles, including signing an executive order mandating the U.S. government include more people with disabilities in its workforce and to establish the first special advisor for international disability rights at the State Department. The celebration was attended by several prominent legislators, agency heads, and leaders in the disability community, including former Senators Tom Harkin (D-IA) and Bob Dole (R-KY) , former Congressman Tony Coelho (D-CA), Representative Steny Hoyer (D-MD), the House Minority Whip, and Secretary of Labor Tom Perez.   View the President’s speech here, read a transcript here, and see the White House ADA anniversary fact sheet here. In addition, a number of federal agencies hosted their own events:

  • The Department of Justice, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), and the Access Board celebrated the event with speeches by Attorney General Loretta Lynch, EEOC Commissioner Chai Feldblum, Senator Bob Dole, Senator Tom Harkin and Representative Steny Hoyer. During the celebration, the EEOC and DOJ signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) to strengthen ADA and Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act enforcement efforts by the agencies. Read more about the event here.
  • The Department of Labor held a series of events including a conversation between Secretary of Labor Tom Perez and disability employment champions Senator Tom Harkin and Delaware Governor Jack Markell.   Watch the video here and see the Department’s ADA webpage here.
  • The Department of Education hosted an event that included a speech by Secretary Arne Duncan, a panel discussion, and outdoor demonstrations of accessible programs and resources. Learn more here.

Click here to see a comprehensive listing of all ADA commemorative events throughout the summer.

Family Support – Bills Introduced in Senate and House to Support Caregivers

The bipartisan Recognize, Assist, Include, Support, and Engage (RAISE) Family Caregivers Act (S. 1719) was introduced in the Senate on July 8, by Sens. Susan Collins (R-ME) and Tammy Baldwin (D-WI). A companion bill (H.R. 3099) was introduced in the House the following week by Representatives Gregg Harper (R-MS) and Kathy Castor (D-FL). The Arc supports the RAISE Family Caregivers Act as it would implement the bipartisan recommendation of the federal Commission on Long-Term Care, that Congress require the development of a national strategy to support family caregivers. The bill would create an advisory body to bring together relevant federal agencies and others from the private and public sectors to advise and make recommendations. The advisory body would identify specific actions that government, communities, providers, employers, and others can take to recognize and support family caregivers, and be updated annually

Family Support – Senate Passes Older Americans Act, Expanding Eligibility for National Family Caregiver Support Program

On July 16, the Older Americans Act Reauthorization Act (S. 192) passed the Senate without amendment. S. 192 is sponsored by Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee Chair Lamar Alexander (R-TN), Ranking Member Patty Murray (D-WA) and Senators Richard Burr (R-NC), and Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT).   Among many other things, the bill includes a fix to the National Family Caregiver Support Program (NFCSP) which provides information to caregivers about available services, assistance in accessing services, individual counseling, support groups, caregiver training, respite care, and supplemental services.   S. 192 would extend NFCSP eligibility to older (age 55 and over) caregivers of their adult children (age 19 to 59) with disabilities. The House is expected to take up the measure in the near future.

Employment – Employment First Policy Promoted

The Secretary of the Department of Labor, Tom Perez, partnered with bipartisan gubernatorial leaders to urge Governors and state governments across the country to adopt Employment First policy. Secretary Perez, Governor Jack Markell (D-DE), and Governor Dennis Daugaard (R-SD) shared a letter encouraging all fifty states to focus on the alignment of policies, practices, and funding resources to prioritize competitive integrated employment as the preferred outcome of day and employment services for all individuals with significant disabilities.

From Small Towns to the White House – The Arc’s Interns Perspective on Celebrating 25 Years of the ADA

By Taylor Woodard and Mike Nagel

UnknownJuly 26, 2015 will mark the 25th anniversary of an important, but too often overlooked, moment in civil rights history: the signing of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The Arc’s Paul Marchand public policy interns, Taylor Woodard from Junction, Texas and Mike Nagel from Wyndmere, North Dakota, both of whom ventured into the nation’s capital determined to change disability policy, had front-row seats to the White House’s official ADA commemoration. Here is a description of that historical occasion though their eyes.

We were in awe as we were escorted through the halls of the epicenter of U.S. government by various members of the Armed Forces. Once at the celebration, we excitedly wandered through elegant corridors and ornate rooms, nibbled hors d’oeuvres, and mingled with disability community leaders and advocates as we waited for the President’s remarks. Photos and videos do not do justice to the elegance of this magnificent building.

After we had soaked in the scenery for a bit, we made our way to the East Room, where the main event was to be held. We were fortunate to snag front-row seats to hear President Obama’s address. From here, we could see so many prominent figures of the disability rights movement: former Senators Tom Harkin and Bob Dole, former Congressman Tony Coelho, as well as Representative Steny Hoyer, House Minority Whip. Finally, the big moment arrived: President Obama, followed by Vice President Joe Biden, stepped up to the podium and began.

With great passion, the President spoke of “tear[ing] down barriers externally, but…also…internally.”   He continued, proclaiming “That’s our responsibility as Americans and it’s our responsibility as fellow human beings.” For young advocates like us, the President’s words certainly ring true: attitudes in society can be, and often are, barriers in and of themselves. And we, as well as all advocates, must remember these truths as we strive for a more inclusive tomorrow.

In closing, President Obama poignantly outlined the accomplishments of the past 25 years as well as laid a path for the future. For us, this future would include ending unnecessary restraint and seclusion, assuring a high-quality education for all, creating supports and services for people with I/DD to live and work in the community, and protecting rights to self-determination and quality of life.

As the crowd applauded, a very different cheer erupted several thousand miles away in two of the nation’s tiniest rural communities, as our proud parents watched their son and daughter shake the hand of the President, a moment we will never forget.

The Arc Urges Congress to Protect our Social Security Lifeline

Washington, DC – The Arc released the following statement from Marty Ford, Senior Executive Officer, Public Policy, in response to several important developments in Washington affecting Social Security, including Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI):

“The Arc applauds the Senate, which yesterday listened to the voices of people with disabilities and seniors, and removed a harmful proposal from legislation to reauthorize our nation’s highways, bridges, and public transportation system. The proposal would have partially funded the bill with cuts to Social Security, SSDI, and SSI. Social Security must not become a piggybank to pay for unrelated programs, no matter how important, and beneficiaries cannot afford any cuts to these modest but vital benefits. The Arc will remain vigilant and ready to fight back if any similar proposals arise as Congress continues to debate reauthorization of surface transportation legislation.

“Earlier this week, the Social Security Trustees released their 2015 report on the current and projected financial status of our nation’s Social Security system. The Trustees continue to find that Social Security’s overall health is strong, but that if Congress fails to act before the end of 2016, nearly 11 million Americans who rely on SSDI will face a 20 percent across the board cut in benefits.

“The Arc calls on Congress to act promptly to prevent this catastrophic cut to our SSDI lifeline. A minor, commonsense financial adjustment can ensure that both of Social Security’s Trust Funds will be able to pay full scheduled benefits through 2034, without any cuts to Social Security disability, retirement, or survivors benefits. We applaud legislation introduced yesterday to do precisely that, by paying all Social Security benefits out of a single Social Security Trust Fund: the One Social Security Act of 2015, sponsored by Rep. Xavier Beccera (D-TX) with 22 original cosponsors.

“The Arc urges Congress to ensure that Social Security will be there for all Americans — including people with disabilities and their families — for generations to come, and to reject any cuts to our Social Security lifeline,” said Ford.

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 665 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Editor’s Note: The Arc is not an acronym; always refer to us as The Arc, not The ARC and never ARC. The Arc should be considered as a title or a phrase.

Easy Ways to Infuse Physical Activity into Daily Life

Picture 027Staying physically active, along with eating healthy, is one of the most important things individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) can do to make sure their body stays healthy and in shape. However, many individuals with ID don’t get the recommended amount of physical activity per week. There are many reasons why individuals don’t get this recommend amount. Transportation issues, not knowing how to get started, and expensive and unaccommodating gyms are just a few.

Being physically active doesn’t mean they have to spend hours in the gym though. Finding small ways in daily life that they can increase their physical activity level will help them to become more active and healthy without having to set aside a lot of extra time, find transportation, or pay expensive fees.

Here are 5 easy ways to help individuals with ID infuse physical activity into their daily life.

  1. Walk – If they are in a wheelchair and can’t walk, wheel.   If they live in community that is save and well paved, walking is an easy and free activity that has many great health benefits!   Make it social and start a walking club in the community or with friends. If it’s close enough (and there’s a safe path) walk to the store to run small errands, etc.
  2. Dance – Turn up that music! Dancing is a great way to burn calories and most of all is fun! Set aside 10-20 minutes after lunch and/or dinner for dance time. It’s a great way to get up after a meal and burn some calories that doesn’t require any special equipment or skills.
  3. Stretch – Waking up ten minutes earlier and allowing time to do some proper stretching will help to get blood flowing and muscles warmed up for the day. Doing this every day will help increase flexibility, decrease injuries, and is a great way to wake up and get the day started.
  4. Garden – Growing and maintaining a garden is a great way to get in some extra activity and learn responsibility. And they’ll have fresh vegetables to show for it!   It also encourages healthy eating and education as individuals learn about what they’re growing.
  5. Utilize TV time – Watching small amounts of TV is OK, but it’s still a lot of sitting time. Utilize the time during commercials to do small exercises such as squats, arms circles, or marching in place. You could even make a game out of it. This will give individuals a few extra minutes of activity per day while watching their favorite TV shows.

Finding small ways to gradually increase physical activity throughout the day will help to get individuals with ID in a happier mind frame and slowly expose them to fun subtle ways to be more active, without making fitness seem like a chore. Gradually, they will start to have more energy and be healthier without even noticing it!

For more information on health and nutrition, check out The Arc’s HealthMeet project, which strives to help individuals with ID improve their health and quality of life.