The Arc Raises Questions in Case of Shocking Abuse and Neglect against Teenager in Anderson, Indiana

Indianapolis, IN – Fifteen years old and weighing less than 40 pounds.  Covered in feces and locked in a room, alone and for an unknown amount of time, by her grandfather.  The police reports released in Anderson, Indiana about the shocking abuse against a teenager with a disability raise significant questions about how this situation could go unnoticed in the community and unmonitored by a litany of state agencies which allowed this child to fall off the radar.

It has been reported the girl was removed from school to be home schooled – Indiana law does not require ongoing involvement from public schools when a family removes a child to be home schooled. Indiana’s Department of Children’s Services (DCS) had contact with the family at one time, but the case was closed.  The police have learned that the child lost access to Medicaid which helped cover nutritional supplements, but as there is no requirement for Medicaid case workers to follow up in such cases, this loss of coverage went unnoticed.

“This is a tragic situation that should never have happened.  The question now is, what can we as a community of advocates, state agencies, and individuals do to learn what went so terribly wrong for this young girl, and how can we all seek and act on ways to keep others safe and free from harm,” said John Dickerson, Executive Director of The Arc of Indiana.

“This is a shameful case of abuse and neglect that should force the system and society to think about how this young girl was hidden in plain sight, starving and without access to medical care, and to force action to prevent something like this from ever happening again.  People with disabilities are far too often victimized, without regard for their basic human rights.  And now this teenager is fighting for her life,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD) is operated by The Arc and is the first national effort of its kind to bring together both victim and suspect/offender issues involving people with I/DD under one roof.  NCCJD is a national clearinghouse for research, information, evaluation, training and technical assistance for criminal justice and disability professionals and other advocates that will build their capacity to better identify and meet the needs of people with I/DD, whose disability often goes unrecognized, and who are overrepresented in the nation’s criminal justice system.  Currently, NCCJD is developing training for law enforcement, victim service providers and legal professionals that will support police departments, prosecutor’s offices, and other professionals in the criminal justice system to effectively and fairly administer justice for people with disabilities.

NCCJD is a much needed resource for the Anderson, Indiana police force and local prosecutors as they pursue this case and will continue to be a resource for many other communities facing similar tragedies. Persons with disabilities are nearly three times more likely to be victimized – people with cognitive disabilities have the highest rate of victimization.  Children with intellectual disabilities are at twice the risk of physical and sexual abuse compared to children without disabilities.

The Arc Advocacy Network in Indiana can provide information, referral and advocacy to assist and guide individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families in understanding and applying for government programs, including Medicaid and home and community based services through the Medicaid Waiver program.  It can also serve as a resource to schools and local public and private agencies serving children and adults with disabilities.

Finally, The Arc has launched an online pledge to generate support to end acts of violence, abuse, and bullying of people I/DD.  The Arc and The Arc of Indiana encourage members of the public to sign this pledge to show their support.

Another Congressional Session Poised to End without Ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons of Persons with Disabilities

CRPDWashington, DC – As the clock winds down on the 114th Congress, U.S. Senate leaders have informed disability advocates that the Convention on the Rights of Persons of Persons with Disabilities will not be put to a vote because the treaty doesn’t have enough support in the chamber.

“It’s pitiful that once again, the U.S. Senate can’t come together and support a disability rights treaty that simply affirms our nation’s support for people across the globe who seek the same rights we enjoy here in the United States. Over 800 disability, civil rights, and faith groups support ratification of the treaty, representing countless people across the country. But this tidal wave of support has not swayed those in the Senate whose objections to this treaty have been proven false to support this cause. The Arc will continue our advocacy on this issue when Congress reconvenes in January,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc has been working with numerous other disability advocacy groups and U.S. Senators to garner support for the ratification of this treaty, which will promote, protect, and ensure the full and equal enjoyment of all human rights and fundamental freedoms by all persons with disabilities. The treaty is modeled after the Americans with Disabilities Act, which affirms the rights of American citizens with disabilities by prohibiting discrimination in employment, public services, public accommodations and services operated by private entities. For years, The Arc’s Public Policy team and grassroots advocates across the country have been working to promote the CRPD and ensure ratification.

The United States signed the CRPD on July 30, 2009, joining the 141 other signing nations. Today, the Convention has 151 ratifications and 159 signatures. On May 17, 2012, following almost three years of thorough review, the Obama Administration submitted its treaty package to the U.S. Senate for its advice and consent for ratification. Senator Bob Dole, who was a champion of the Americans with Disabilities Act, was present for the last attempt to vote on the treaty in December 2012 and urged his fellow Republicans to support it. Unfortunately, his plea along with strong Congressional and disability community support was not enough to overcome the unfounded fears raised by the opposition.

Champions Change Lives

Become a ChampionThis year– we shared with you inspirational stories about three individuals who are working to create a better future for their families, their peers and the nation as a part of The Arc’s nationwide movement towards independence and inclusion for all people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) and their families. Each of them are champions for The Arc’s movement.

Champions like David — creating a future for himself while helping his brother achieve his dream of sustaining employment in the community. Champions like Kim — advocating so strongly about inclusion for both of her daughters that she founded a nonprofit to foster an inclusive environment for kids in schools across the country. Champions like Joe — dedicating his life’s work to creating a better future for himself, his brother, and his peers as a selfadvocate and teaching others to be their own best advocate.

David, Kim, and Joe are a true inspiration. Looking to the future, it is clear that we need many more champions to realize the vision of individuals with I/DD getting all the supports they need to lead a fully inclusive life.

This year, The Arc engaged in groundbreaking work to innovate and address the needs of individuals with I/DD through our national initiatives including: Wings for Autism, our Center for Future Planning, and our National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability, all while continuing to aggressively pursue our legislative agenda.

Our Wings For Autism® program really took off this year. A travel training simulation for families that have a son or daughter with autism or other disabilities continues to gain traction and is being implemented by chapters of The Arc at airports across America including in North Carolina, Florida, Alaska, Oklahoma, Washington, Arizona, Virginia, Maryland, District of Columbia, Connecticut, New Hampshire and Massachusetts.

The Center for Future Planning a resource center designed by The Arc to help families and individuals with I/DD to create person-centered future plans. The center will support families by empowering person centered planning in order to help them articulate what they would like to achieve over the course of their life and then providing a concrete plan to help them do so.

We also broke ground to protect the rights of people with disabilities in the criminal justice system, through the launch of our new National Center for Criminal Justice and Disability funded by the U.S. Department of Justice.

However, these initiatives require the dedication and generosity of champions like you to ensure they become fully effective, sustainable and continue to meet community needs into the future.

It is only through your financial support that The Arc is able to continue its important work.

The collective voice of champions like you will advance and protect the human rights of individuals with I/DD and help them achieve full inclusion and participation in their communities today and into the future. Please become a champion for The Arc and Donate Today!

The Arc Marks House Passage of ABLE Act

Washington, DC – Today, as the U.S. House of Representatives passed the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act (ABLE Act), The Arc, the nation’s largest organization for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), released the following statement:

“We are pleased that the Achieving a Better Life Experience Act, H.R. 647, has been approved by the U.S. House of Representatives, and is one step closer to reaching President Obama’s desk.  We appreciate the untiring work of the chief sponsors of the bill and the support of a large and broad representation in Congress.  The ABLE Act is a good example of how members of both political parties can work together to craft legislation that benefits people with disabilities, as disability knows no political, geographic, gender, or ethnic boundaries.

“While the legislation was narrowed due to the constraints from the cost analysis, the approved bill will provide a vehicle for some families and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to save for the future.  The Arc will continue to work with the leadership and chief sponsors of this effort in Congress to expand this program in the future to ensure that everyone in need can get the maximum benefit from this legislation.  Our goal is to ensure that people with disabilities get the full use of the ABLE Act.   We still have concerns about certain pay-fors in the bill, and hope that the House and Senate can resolve these issues,” said Peter V. Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The ABLE Act aims to change the tax code to allow for tax advantaged savings accounts for individuals with disabilities for certain expenses, like education, housing, and transportation.  Similar to existing “Section 529” education savings accounts, ABLE accounts would let families save for disability-related expenses on behalf of qualified beneficiaries with disabilities that will supplement, but not replace, benefits provided through the Medicaid program, the Supplemental Security Income program, the beneficiary’s employment, and other sources.  If properly managed, funds in the ABLE accounts would not jeopardize eligibility for critical federal benefits.  With full understanding of its features, individuals and families could use the ABLE accounts as another tool in planning for the lifetime needs of an individual with long term disabilities.  The version of the bill that passed the U.S. House of Representatives includes age limitations and a cap on contributions, added in July by the Committee on Ways and Means to reduce the costs of the bill.

What it is really like to be diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) as an adult

By Amy Goodman, Co-Director of the Autism NOW Center, at The Arc of the United States

Amy Goodman

Amy Goodman

In the recent past, Jerry Seinfeld had mentioned that he might be on the autism spectrum and then he had to backtrack and say he wasn’t on the spectrum. Because of a play he saw that was about autism, he thought he had some connection to it. That is all fine and dandy, but what about individuals who have been diagnosed with it as an adult and live with it every day. I just wanted to say that autism, ASD, or Asperger’s is nothing to be taken lightly. It is a developmental disability that affects how one thinks and it is the reactions that one has to the environment around them.

To me what it means to be diagnosed as an adult is this: It meant I finally found what I had been searching for, for more than 30 years. It meant closure of something looming over me. It meant satisfaction in me and my life in general. It was a relief to put a name to my idiosyncrasies and it gave me understanding and wisdom.

I was able to take responsibility for my life, make new plans on what I wanted to do with myself and I was able to put the pieces together and step through the next hurdle in my life. It gave me freedom to explore new opportunities and to see myself for who I am. I had a new found confidence and I realized I’m not different, that I do have a purpose and it also allowed me follow my dreams and go in a totally new direction.

It opened my eyes and washed away all my guilt that I had about myself and my abilities; therefore I was able to move forward with my new life. It gave me a whole new understanding of myself. The understanding was this that I am who I am and I am not bad, diseased, or broken. I have a name for all my challenges but that it is not a label, it is not bad, it just is. It is part of who I am and it will always be with me, but in the end does it really matter that I am on the spectrum? No, it does not. I am a human first and I have a name, Amy, autism or Asperger’s does not define me. So, I stopped obsessing over it, embraced it for what it is and I used my characteristics to help me to identify my next steps.

I took those next steps and I found that I am lovable, capable, and that I can do better than what others thought I was capable of doing. In fact, I have expanded my horizons and have even impressed myself with what I can do.

It means you know who you are, and it helped me to identify what I needed to do and by having this new found knowledge I was able to help others to see the light as well. Individuals with autism and Asperger’s are capable, bright, and able to achieve all of their dreams and then some if they just put their mind to it. Some individuals may need more help along the way than others, but don’t ever let anyone tell you “you can’t” because the reality is you can.

Dream big, live life to the fullest, and be happy. Do what you are meant to do. Being diagnosed as an adult gave me inspiration to do something, that something was go to graduate school and get my Master’s in Special Education with a minor in autism, so do something and make something of yourself. It can be done, if you have hope, happiness, and faith and you will succeed. Don’t give up, always remember to smile and remember this: No is not the answer. Yes is always the answer and what was the question? Oh I guess I forgot oh well it doesn’t matter because the answer will always be what you want it to be. That is yes, I can Yes, I will and Yes, I did. I conquered it and now that is all I have to say.

Planning for the Future of a Family Member with Disabilities

Second in a Three-Part Series

By Laurie Hanson, Esq., Special Needs Alliance

Special Needs Alliance LogoThere are an estimated 600,000-700,000 adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in the United States who are living with aging family members and with no plan in place for their future. With the launch of the Center for Future Planning, The Arc is shining a spotlight on the need to encourage and support families to create person-centered future plans. The Center provides practical assistance and resources on future planning items such as expressing wishes for the future, supporting daily and major life decisions, and financing the future.

Below, our colleagues from the Special Needs Alliance emphasize the importance of planning and trusts.

In the first installment to our series, we discussed third party special needs trusts (SNT), also known as supplemental needs trusts, currently the best vehicles available to provide for a family member living with a disability after the parents’ death. In order to use this vehicle, parents need to understand how a trust works, how to tailor it to fit the specific needs of their family member, and how much money should be placed into the trust. Consider the following example:

Gary Smith wants Trusted Community Bank to manage his money after his death for the benefit of his daughter, Beth Smith, who is living with Down syndrome. Beth lives in a group home. Her support services are paid by a Medicaid waiver, and her room and board is paid from her Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefit. Gary does not want the money he provides to impact Beth’s SSI or her Medicaid waiver, and he has very specific ways he wants the money to be used for her benefit. Gary is single and has three other children.

What is a trust? A trust is an instrument to manage money. A trust is established by written agreement between the person who funds the trust (the grantor) and the person or financial institution responsible for managing the money in the trust (the trustee) for the benefit of a person called the “beneficiary.”

What is a third party special needs trust? A special needs trust (SNT) is a trust established to provide for the well-being and needs of a person living with a disability. As long as the trust is established and administered correctly, neither the property in the trust nor the distributions from the trust should jeopardize the beneficiary’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Medicaid. A third party SNT is a trust funded with money that does not belong to the person with a disability. In the example above, Gary (the grantor) can establish an SNT, then place his assets in the trust to be managed and administered for Beth’s benefit. He would give instructions in the trust agreement as to how the money should be used for Beth’s benefit and what happens to the money following Beth’s death.

Who should serve as trustee? Choose the trustee carefully. Often it’s advisable to select a professional or bank with experience managing special needs trusts. It is important that the trustee be familiar with complex government regulations, which change frequently. While a family member could serve as trustee, the individual should be skilled at paperwork and accounting, and able to work well with the beneficiary. Sometimes it is better to leave trust administration to the professionals. This is an issue to discuss with an attorney before making a decision.

What property is controlled by the trust? Only money or property legally given to the trust is controlled by the trust. If property is not titled in the name of the trust, it is not controlled or protected by the trust.

  • A home can be titled in the name of the trust.
  • Gary could make the trust the beneficiary of his IRA or other retirement accounts, his life insurance, or CDs and savings bonds.
  • Gary could leave money and property to the trust in his will.
  • A bank account can be opened to place money in a checking or savings account in the name of the trust.

How much money should be placed in a third party SNT? This depends upon the beneficiary with I/DD! Parents should work with a financial planner to make projections based on the family member’s living expenses, income, public benefits, caregivers, etc. For instance, say that Gary wants someone to visit Beth as often as he does – twice a week. In addition, every Friday he makes arrangements for someone (sometimes him) to go to dinner and a movie with Beth. This allows him and other people in Beth’s life to see her in her home and assess how she is doing. He very much wants this to continue following his death. He will have to project the cost of providing this service over Beth’s life expectancy to determine how much money should be placed in the trust.

What is a third party pooled SNT? A third party pooled SNT is a master trust established by a non-profit corporation to hold a third party’s assets for the benefit of a person with a disability. A parent will sign a joinder agreement to set up a sub-account within the pooled trust for the benefit of his or her family member. The funds in the sub-account are pooled with funds of other accounts for investment purposes only, but a separate sub-account is maintained for each beneficiary. Money in a sub-account of a properly established pooled trust will not jeopardize a beneficiary’s Medicaid and/or SSI benefits.

Why use a pooled trust?  Pooled trust sub-accounts are most beneficial when the amount in the trust will not be enough to justify the expense of a corporate trustee (such as a trust company or a bank). Also, the trustee of the pooled trust is professional and often has special knowledge about persons with disabilities. Pooled trusts should be expected to remain up-to-date on changing laws and regulations affecting federal benefits and their relationship to trusts. Many chapters of The Arc, for instance, have established pooled trusts for families and others to use. Some pooled trusts are run by chapters and others are independent non-profit organizations.

Why not “disinherit” a family member with a disability and rely on the siblings to care for him/her? This is very risky – siblings could move away, die, or become ill themselves. Some of them just decide to use the money for themselves. And in a divorce, the sibling’s spouse may be entitled to some of the funds intended for the person with I/DD. If that happens, the person with the disability could be left unprotected.

What happens if there is money left in the third party trust or pooled trust sub-account when the beneficiary dies? The grantor states in the third party SNT agreement what he or she wants to have happen. In this case, Gary could state that at Beth’s death, any funds left in the trust should be distributed to his other three children, his grandchildren, or a charity. In a pooled trust sub-account, the language of the pooled trust master agreement will often specify that a certain percentage remain with the master trust at the death of the beneficiaries before distribution to other remainder beneficiaries. Pooled trusts vary on this, so families should check this detail.

Third Party SNTs can be complicated and state requirements vary, so families should work with professionals who are experienced with the nuances of changing government regulations. But the effort pays dividends, and can ensure a more secure future for a loved one.

The Special Needs Alliance (SNA) is a national non-profit comprised of attorneys who assist individuals with special needs, their families and the professionals who serve them. SNA is partnering with The Arc to provide educational resources, build public awareness, and advocate for policies on behalf of people with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families. This article does not constitute legal advice and individuals should consult legal counsel concerning their specific situations.

The Arc Joins #GivingTuesday

#GivingTuesday buttonThis year, The Arc of the United States is joining the national movement of #GivingTuesday to kick-off the holiday season. On the heels of Black Friday and Cyber Monday, #GivingTuesday is meant to inspire people to take collaborative action to improve their local communities and give back in better, smarter ways to the charities and causes they support to help create a better world.

Join us in harnessing the power of social media to demonstrate the vibrant community of champions that make up our movement.

Throughout the year, we have focused on the amazing advocates that make up The Arc and allow us to succeed. On #GivingTuesday, we ask you to show us your support by giving a donation or simply sharing that you support The Arc.

Ways to participate:

Twitter logo Twitter logo
  • Encourage your friends and family to do the same.

The Arc recognizes that all the work we do would not be possible without our champions and that not all support comes in the same way. Thank you!

Help The Arc kick off the holiday season strong and Achieve with Us!

 

 

 

Thank You! You Mean the World to The Arc

This year at The Arc’s National Convention we asked the over 800 attendees, “What Does The Arc Mean to You?” and the response blew us away! With Thanksgiving right around the corner, we here at The Arc have been contemplating the same question and our resounding answer is YOU!

The Arc is incomplete without you and your dedication to our mission to ensure that those with intellectual and developmental disabilities live a fully inclusive life. You breathe life into our mission and together we will be successful.

From the board and staff of the National office of The Arc, please accept our sincere and deep appreciation of YOU and your ongoing support of our cause nationally, statewide and locally.

We could not have accomplished all that we did this year without you, so this holiday season we wanted to THANK YOU for your commitment, support and generosity to The Arc.

From all of us here at The Arc, we wish you a safe and happy Thanksgiving.

Case Dismissed: National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability Provides Critical Support to Bring Justice in Illinois

The Arc’s National Center on Criminal Justice and Disability (NCCJD) fields calls from all over the country regarding people with disabilities in the criminal justice system. From a first encounter with a police officer to their time behind bars, the horrors people with disabilities regularly face are shocking and appalling. All too often, it’s simply a blatant disregard for human rights that set off a chain of events that deny people with I/DD justice. And the fact that this continues to occur in 2014 is unacceptable. However, every so often, a case comes to our attention and events unfold in a way that looks a little bit more like “justice.”

Pathways to Justice - First Contact

A few months ago, an Illinois family contacted NCCJD to search for assistance. Their son, Jack1, who has intellectual and developmental disabilities, had been charged with felony assault at the group home he had recently moved into. After a verbal altercation between Jack and another resident, a third resident called the police. Jack was arrested and, in the process, struck a police officer who grabbed him by the hoodie from behind as he attempted to exit the situation. The officer threatened to taze him if he did not cooperate while they had Jack on the ground trying to handcuff him.

Pathways to Justice - Jail

Jack spent 24 hours in jail without support or access to his medication. His parents called and spoke to the supervisor of the Adult Detention Center to inform them of Jack’s needs. Jack’s parents were told that their son should be able to tell the nurse himself about his needs and pharmacy information. Jack was unable to do that, leaving him at risk and without access to his medications. Jack was read his Miranda rights without assistance and he did not understand what he was agreeing to. His parents were never called while he was jailed.

Jack was assigned a public defender the day he went to bond court. The judge initially put a large bond on Jack because he struck a police officer. However, the public defender argued for low-no bail because of Jack’s disability. The judge reduced bond from $30,000 to $10,000, after asking Jack’s parents if they could afford the $1,000 on a $10,000. Jack was out on bond when, as part of the legal process, his competency was evaluated and he was found unfit to stand trial. The state attorney refused to dismiss charges and the public defender was forced to send Jack for a sanity evaluation—which was completed by the same state appointed psychologist that earlier saw him for competency. Jack was found not sane at the time of the incident.

Pathways to Justice - Trial

These sets of circumstances are all too common for people with disabilities, and are a great injustice. Thankfully, Jack had a public defender that insisted upon a competency evaluation and a sanity evaluation. And Jack’s parents contacted NCCJD and The Arc of Illinois Life Span Program looking for resources. Jack’s mother found NCCJD through The Arc’s main webpage and used the “Request Assistance” form to e-mail NCCJD. Working together with family members, Jack’s service providers, The Arc of Illinois Life Span Program, and NCCJD, advocates were able to put together a personalized justice plan for Jack. The plan outlined resources and possible alternatives for assisting Jack in the community and the plan was supported by the Director of Illinois Department of Human Services, Division of Developmental Disabilities. The report was submitted to Jack’s public defender, who used the report to get the case dismissed. Because the public defender was able to demonstrate that Jack had appropriate services in the community and that there were additional supports being made available as needed, the case was dismissed.

Jack was arrested in mid-March of 2014 and the case was finally dismissed in mid-October. There were almost monthly hearings throughout the ordeal, causing a great amount of stress to everyone involved. When the case was finally dismissed, the family felt like Jack had been misunderstood by the legal system from the beginning. They believe the court did not understand the difference between mental illness and developmental disability, because the judge often spoke to Jack as though he had a normal IQ but was experiencing mental illness. The parents continually questioned the public defender as to whether the judge and state attorney were aware that Jack had a developmental disability. Despite all the shortcomings in this case, the public defender took the necessary steps to ensure dismissal of the case, and the Judge was open to reading the personalized justice plan and making a dismissal.

When asked how he felt when he was arrested, Jack said:

“My heart was racing 290 because I was in the back of a squad car, handcuffed.” [At the police station] “I pretty much felt like a nervous wreck.” [When I went to the Adult Detention Center] “I felt sick to my stomach because I was around people I didn’t know.” [A couple of days before court] “I felt scared and nervous.” [At court] “I felt scared I was going to jail.” [On the last day of court] “the judge calmly talked to me and explained what would happen the next time I got in trouble.” [When the court case was dismissed] “I was still edgy.” “I feel more calmly now” [that it is over.]

The family said of their experience:

“Although this experience was excruciatingly painful for us, there was a positive outcome. The experience has helped our family realize there is work to be done in this area to make sure this never happens to anyone else. We are on board with helping NCCJD and The Arc of Illinois in any way we can to get legislation changed and the first responders, courts, etc. trained in handling the I/DD population. This needs to happen in all communities across the U.S. with group homes. NCCJD is a great national center to dispense this information so that each state/community doesn’t have to keep reinventing the wheel, which would make this happen even faster! We would also like to thank Leigh Ann Davis and Kathryn Walker for their time and efforts. Leigh Ann took time out of a business trip to make contact with me to make sure information was being shared. This is what we need — go to people!!!”

Deb Fornoff, Director of The Arc of Illinois, Illinois Life Span Program said:

“The staff of The National Center on Criminal Justice and Developmental Disability provided support, information, and connection with experienced legal advocates who provided the information we needed to put together a Personal Justice Plan. This Plan was assembled with tremendous collaboration between this man’s family and their son’s service providers, and facilitated by the staff from Illinois Life Span. It provided much needed information to the court about this individual and the services and supports in place and available to him. The plan included details that were otherwise very difficult to address. Thank you, Leigh Ann Davis and Kathryn Walker for your time, your help, and your ongoing commitment to alleviating the injustice that currently exists for individuals with ID/DD in our legal system nationwide.”

NCCJD would not be the resource it is without the dedication of advocates like Deb and families like Jack’s. To anyone with a criminal justice and disability issue, please request assistance! For more information on Personalized Justice Plans, view NCCJD’s archived webinar.

To find a list of resources by state or submit a resource, please visit our state by state map.

1 Names have been changed to protect the privacy of those involved.

Fall Is Racing Season!

If you’re a runner or have any runner friends you might have heard them talk about fall being race season. To many runners, the crisp autumn weather is considered the “perfect” running weather and a lot of people head out to local parks, community centers, etc. to take part in the fun of running a race – whether it’s a 5k (3.1 miles) or a marathon.

CDC’s Vital Signs earlier this year sent out shocking statistics that half of all adults with disabilities get no aerobic exercise at all and are three times more likely to have heart disease, stroke and diabetes. For those that are able, running/walking is a great way to get in daily exercise without having to have a special place to go or expensive equipment to use. The only real equipment that is needed is proper shoes and comfortable workout clothing.

While running may be hard for some to start off with walking can actually provide many of the same health benefits as running without all the impact that running endures on the body. Running and walking are both great cardiovascular activities that help to build muscle and endurance, make your heart stronger, and help relieve high blood pressure. They also burn calories which aid in weight loss and reducing the risk of type 2 diabetes.

While running/walking is a very individualized sport that you don’t need anyone else to do it with, it can actually be a very social activity as well. A walking club is a great way to stay active and socialize with friends at the same time. All over the country are runs and walks of various distances that anyone can take part in, regardless of if they have an intellectual disability or not. Now-a-days more and more races are taking the initiative to specifically reach out to individuals with intellectual disabilities to be a part of the action. Girls on the Run (GOTR) is a 12 week running program for girls ranging from 3rd to 8th grade with the goal of finishing a sponsored 5k race at the end of the program. GOTR in Columbia has reached out to The Arc of Midlands to work with them to recruit individuals to join in one of their upcoming races. The Spartan Race is an off-road race combined with different obstacles throughout the course and has grown significantly more popular in past years. The Spartan Race has recently modified their course in certain locations to develop a Special Needs Obstacle Course so that individuals with intellectual disabilities can participate as well.

Completing a race is more than just doing the miles. In addition to the many physical benefits from running or walking there is also a great sense of accomplishment and pride that comes from crossing the finish line filled with the support of spectators cheering you on. It helps to boost overall self-esteem and mood, which is what draws many people back to do another race. Many races give out shirts and some even give medals to everyone who finishes, which is a great bonus to all the hard work and training that has been accomplished.

A popular fun race to do every year is a Turkey Trot on Thanksgiving Day morning. It’s a great way to get the entire family and friends out to be active and do an activity that includes individuals of all ages and fitness levels. It’s also a great way to burn some calories before that big turkey dinner later in the day! So this fall think about joining a running/walking group in your community or start one with friends and family to help increase your fitness level. To find local races in your area, check out the race calendar. Learn more ways to stay healthy and active by checking out The Arc’s HealthMeet page.