Meet the Hometown Host: Baymont and The Arc Reimagine Breakfast Furthering Opportunities for People with Disabilities

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PARSIPPANY, N.J. (December 1, 2016) – Baymont Inn & Suites unites with The Arc – a leading national advocate for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) – to open more doors in hospitality for individuals with I/DD, including autism and Down syndrome, as the hotel brand redefines breakfast with its new Hometown Host role.

Baymont Inn & Suites is redefining traditional hotel breakfast with its new Hometown Host role. Elizabeth, pictured above, is a Hometown Host at the Baymont in Newark, Del.

Baymont Inn & Suites is redefining traditional hotel breakfast with its new Hometown Host role. Elizabeth, pictured above, is a Hometown Host at the Baymont in Newark, Del.

Unveiled just before International Day of Persons with Disabilities on December 3, 2016, Baymont’s new Hometown Host role is a symbol of the brand’s emphasis on neighborly service and dedication to community, ensuring guests are feeling welcome and food is abundant throughout daily breakfast service. Baymont franchisees recruiting for a Hometown Host are encouraged to take advantage of The Arc’s resources in helping connect them with passionate local job candidates within their neighborhoods.

In addition to serving as a service champion and breakfast attendant, Hometown Hosts from Baymont hotels across the country are invited to participate in a voluntary advisory council, supported by The Arc, to help improve the brand’s breakfast offerings. The council will meet regularly to share insights and best practices for perfecting the brand’s free breakfast for guests.

“No matter what’s on the table, we believe breakfast is best served and savored with good company. That’s where our Hometown Hosts come in: they’re the first person greeting our guests in the morning and ensuring they have a great start to the day,” said Greg Giordano, Baymont Inn & Suites brand vice president. “Our collaboration with The Arc not only connects our franchisees to a resource attracting associates who embody our signature culture of neighborly hospitality for guests, but also demonstrates to all communities of diversity they have an advocate in Baymont.”

Building Opportunities One Breakfast at a Time
Unemployment among people living with disabilities is a critical issue. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, unemployment rate for individuals with disabilities is higher than 11%, approximately double the nation’s average. Of those employed, only about 40% hold regular jobs in the community rather than within sheltered workshops or other restricted settings. The Arc serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, a population in which unemployment is much higher – 85% of families report that their adult family members with I/DD are not employed.

“Our collaboration with Baymont proactively creates opportunities for both those with disabilities and hoteliers to make positive and transformative contributions within their communities,” said Jonathan Lucus, director, The Arc@Work. “Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are not only capable of excelling on the job, but have experience, ideas and perspectives to continually enrich businesses. We can’t wait to see how our relationship with Baymont shakes up the makeup of hotel breakfast.”

The Arc@Work is leading the way in developing innovative workforce solutions for the government and private sector by connecting employers with talented employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities and supporting the recruitment, on-boarding, and retention process. The goal is to connect organizations with people and services that increase the diversity, productivity, and quality of their overall workforce.

Hotels including the Baymont Inn & Suites Augusta Riverwatch in Georgia have already experienced positive results employing individuals with disabilities including longer tenure, strong enthusiasm and an increase in guest engagement. Baymont hotels in Florida, Pennsylvania, and Michigan, one of the states with the lowest workforce participation rates for people with disabilities, have already pledged to work with The Arc as part of this initiative.

“We’ve been employing individuals with disabilities for more than 10 years at our hotel, and it’s the best business decision I’ve ever made,” said Kanta Kondur, owner of Baymont Inn & Suites August Riverwatch. “Our associates, like William and Robert, quickly become part of the Baymont family and show an extraordinary dedication to the hotel and our guests. I have no doubt other Baymont owners will find similar success working with The Arc.”

About The Arc
The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, Autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, Cerebral Palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

About Baymont Inn & Suites
Part of Wyndham Hotel Group, the Baymont Inn & Suites® hotel brand is a chain of more than 400 midscale hotels located throughout the United States and in Mexico that takes pride in neighborly hospitality grounded in the ability to connect with every guest. It’s all about warm, inviting service, topped with freshly baked cookies and a friendly smile. Many locations feature free Wi-Fi, continental breakfast at the Baymont Breakfast Corner®, swimming pools, fitness centers, airport shuttle service and the opportunity to earn and redeem points through Wyndham Rewards®, the brand’s guest loyalty program. Travelers can join the free program at www.wyndhamrewards.com.   Each Baymont Inn & Suites hotel is independently owned and operated under a franchise agreement with Baymont Franchise Systems, Inc. (BFS), or its affiliate. BFS is a subsidiary of Wyndham Hotel Group, LLC and parent company Wyndham Worldwide Corporation (NYSE: WYN). Reservations and information are available by visiting www.baymontinns.com.

Wyndham Hotel Group is the world’s largest hotel company based on number of hotels, encompassing nearly 8,000 hotels and approximately 689,800 rooms in 75 countries. Additional information is available at www.wyndhamworldwide.com. For more information about hotel franchising opportunities visit www.whgdevelopment.com.

CONTACT:
Gabriella Chiera
Wyndham Hotel Group
(973) 753 – 6689
Gabriella.chiera@wyn.com

Kristen McKiernan
The Arc
(202) 534-3712
mckiernan@thearc.org

The Arc@Work Lands Investment in Employment Placement Services from The Walmart Foundation

Washington, DC – The Arc’s employment program, The Arc@Work, is pleased to announce it has received a $245,000, one-year grant from the Walmart Foundation. This funding will be dedicated toward developing innovative programs that place people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) in competitive, integrated employment within their communities.

Current research indicates that 85% of people with I/DD are unemployed. The Arc is working with the public and private sectors to change this reality and offer an opportunity for people with I/DD to obtain meaningful career opportunities alongside people without disabilities on an unprecedented scale. New developments include a government directive to hire 100,000 employees with disabilities as well as updated regulations for federal contractors. As a result, the federal government and more than 45,000 contractors that include many Fortune 500 companies are now seeking employees with disabilities like never before. Unfortunately, this current demand cannot be matched by existing workforce systems that support the I/DD community. And without a strong, unified pipeline in place, this population will not benefit from these new guidelines as much as other disability groups.

“For far too long, people with intellectual and developmental disabilities have been relegated to the margins of the working world. Along with private initiatives, new government regulations promise to dramatically increase the number of people with disabilities placed alongside of people without disabilities in integrated, competitive environments. The support from the Walmart Foundation will allow The Arc to build a system that will transform the existing pool of talented candidates with disabilities into productive employees,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The Arc@Work is well-positioned to tackle this challenge, as it has the expertise and resources to harness the current social, political, and philanthropic energy behind workforce development efforts for people with I/DD. For this particular project, The Arc@Work will utilize existing infrastructure, as well as tap sixteen chapters of The Arc to create an increased number of corporate hiring opportunities. Ultimately this model will connect well-qualified job seekers with I/DD to local, regional, and national employers. The chapters that will be involved include UCP Seguin (IL); The Arc of the Midlands (SC); The Arc of Spokane; The Arc of Anchorage (AK); The Arc of Montgomery County (MD); The Arc of El Paso (TX); The Arc of Monroe County (NY); St. Louis Arc (MO); The Arc of Chester County (PA); Berkshire County Arc (MA); Star, Inc. (CT); The Arc of North Carolina (NC); The Arc Davidson County and Greater Nashville (TN); VersAbility (VA); The Arc of Bristol County (MA); and ADEC (IN), each of which will receive an average sub-grant award of $10,000.

Many of these chapters currently offer high-quality employment services for people with I/DD, such as job development, job coaching, as well as skill-building opportunities like preparation for interviews and resume development. Under their guidance, people with I/DD will receive support to secure competitive employment in their communities. Additionally, over the project period, the chapters of The Arc will strengthen their capacity to place people with I/DD into integrated, community-based employment by developing or deepening partnerships with local, regional, and national employers during the project period. Local, regional, or national employers will be able to improve their ability to successfully employ people with I/DD as a result of their partnership with The Arc.

“This grant is an example of the Walmart Foundation’s commitment to modeling one of our core values – Respect for the Individual, “said Carol May, Program Manager of the Walmart Foundation. “We desire to see communities empower all individuals to reach their full potential.”

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of over 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Managing Legal Settlements

By Neal A. Winston, CELA, Special Needs Alliance®

There are many factors to consider when a family member is seeking legal compensation for personal injuries, whether they result from medical malpractice, a car or workplace accident, or some other mishap. Given the supports that an individual with disabilities might need throughout life, even large sums can prove insufficient and must be carefully managed. Personal injury attorneys are often unaware of how a settlement can affect an individual’s eligibility for important public benefits, and families should ensure that a special needs attorney is consulted as early as possible during the course of their suit.

Liens and Set-Asides

Although personal injury awards are usually not taxable, there may be various liens against the settlement which must be satisfied before putting the money to other uses. If Medicaid, Medicare or, in some cases, private insurers have been paying for injury-related care that has been compensated as part of the settlement, they may need to be reimbursed.

In addition, if the individual is currently on Medicare, or is likely to become covered within 30 months, it may be necessary to create a Medicare Set-Aside (MSA) arrangement. While government guidelines are currently unclear, this can have implications for settlements of $25,000 or more, and legal counsel should be consulted.

Assessing Needs

A candid evaluation of the individual’s short- and long-term needs should guide the family in determining how to manage the remaining funds. Of major importance is whether or not means-tested public benefits such as Medicaid and Supplemental Security Income (SSI) will be required. If such programs will play a role, steps should be taken to ensure that settlement funds won’t disqualify the individual from such programs.

Depending on the size of the settlement and immediate needs, it may be possible to quickly “spend down” the award so that its effect on benefits is short-term. Home renovations to improve accessibility or purchase of a van are among many possibilities.

Another option for smaller settlements is placing up to $14,000 per year in an ABLE account for the individual. Funds held in such accounts are not considered when evaluating someone’s eligibility for Medicaid and SSI and can be used for a wide array of needs relating to the person’s disability. A person is limited to a single ABLE account, the disability must have begun before age 26, and the person must be receiving SSI or Social Security disability benefits, or have a doctor’s diagnosis of a disability meeting Social Security’s definition. If the account balance exceeds $100,000, SSI payments will be suspended, but Medicaid services continue. The maximum value of an ABLE account for Medicaid eligibility without SSI is the same as the maximum value of a 529 college savings account in the state in which the ABLE account is opened. Be aware that upon the beneficiary’s death, funds remaining in an ABLE account must be used to pay back Medicaid for any services rendered on the individual’s behalf after the ABLE account is created.

Larger settlements should be protected in a first party special needs trust (SNT) or a “pooled” SNT account.  While individual first party trusts are administered by trustees chosen by the beneficiary, pooled SNTs are administered by nonprofit organizations.

Like an ABLE account, a first party SNT must reimburse Medicaid upon the beneficiary’s death. In some states, part or all of a pooled trust’s remaining funds revert to the administering nonprofit. Any funds left must then reimburse Medicaid before being available to other beneficiaries.

Distributions

Distributions from a first-party SNT are regulated and must be for the exclusive benefit of the individual for whom the trust has been created. If the money is used for food or shelter, it will reduce SSI payments up to a certain limit. The beneficiary cannot have any individual control over distributions from the trust.

Consideration can be given to reimbursement or compensation from the settlement to third parties in certain circumstances and using the proper procedure without causing benefit program penalties. For instance, a family may have run up significant debt while caring for the injured person. They may have resorted to credit cards or borrowed from friends and relatives. If someone gave up a paying job to care for the individual, they may need to be paid for their services to compensate them for lost pay from their regular work. These are all expenses that might properly be handled with settlement money and are best handled prior to creating the SNT. Money should be held in an escrow account, and payment should be made directly to those to whom the money is owed. Benefit programs have different rules, but most involve a written agreement or understanding reached before the services were rendered for the reimbursement or compensation in order to avoid penalties. Funds passing through parents’ hands could also affect eligibility for benefits. If the individual is a minor or an adult with a guardian or conservator, court approval may be required to make any reimbursement.

Even if government benefits are not a consideration, the beneficiary may need assistance managing the award, in which case a settlement protection trust similar to an SNT, can be established. If initially drafted properly, it may be converted to an SNT at a later date, if necessary.

Investments and Award Management

Trustees have discretion to make a wide range of investments. These might include traditional investment accounts, government insured or guaranteed accounts, life insurance or even real estate, either to produce income or to provide a residence for the beneficiary. Generally, the accounts should only invest in moderate or lower risk entities, and the funds should never be loaned to the trustee or family members. Many states have regulations that control investments and distributions from SNTs and other trusts.

For larger awards, structured payments for a portion of the settlement may be considered. This requires the defendant or his/her insurer to purchase, at the time of the settlement, an irrevocable annuity for the beneficiary that guarantees specific periodic or lump sum payments over an agreed-to period of time. If the timed payments will be large enough to affect eligibility for benefits, arrangements should be made for them to be paid into an SNT and/or an ABLE account.

On the plus side, structured payments are exempt from income tax and have scheduled payouts that ensure that money will continue to be available for a stated period. On the other hand, with interest rates at historic lows, the beneficiary may be locked into long-term dependence on low-performing investments.

Seek Advice

The options for handling a legal settlement are many, with interrelated implications. Families should ensure that a special needs attorney is part of their legal team to ensure that eligibility for means-tested benefits is not jeopardized and other disability-related issues are addressed.

 

The Special Needs Alliance (SNA)® is a national non-profit comprised of attorneys who assist individuals with special needs, their families, and the professionals who serve them. SNA is partnering with The Arc to provide educational resources, build public awareness, and advocate for policies on behalf of people with intellectual/developmental disabilities and their families. A free manual, “Administering a Special Needs Trust: A Handbook for Trustees,” can be downloaded from the SNA website.

Zach’s Big Move Out: An Update on the Morris Family

zachLast year, The Arc published a blog by Ray Morris, founder of Dads 4 Special Kids and father to Zach and Tyler. The piece highlighted the enormous impact Zach, who has intellectual and developmental disabilities, has made on Ray and the Morris home. The Arc’s readers will be happy to learn that Zach is transitioning through another stage all young adults face: venturing out of their family home, and into the wider world.

Zach’s transition out of the family home began while he was participating in a group at his adult day program. During this time, he met John and Lisa, a couple that has dedicated their lives to caring for adults with disabilities and have been certified to run an Adult Developmental Home (ADH). John and Lisa offered Zach a place to live at their ADH. After many discussions, Zach and his family worked with John and Lisa to make his move and path toward adulthood smoother for everyone.

Like many young adults who have just moved out on their own, Zach is busy soaking up his surroundings and his “personality has flourished” according to his dad. Some of Zach’s new-found hobbies include attending Professional Arena Football games and exploring the Phoenix Home & Garden Show. Zach’s parents and brother, Tyler, are thrilled that Zach is becoming more independent and discovering a new chapter in his life.

The entire Morris family has been changed by Zach’s move out of the family home. Zach’s younger brother, Tyler, recently celebrated his wedding in France. This was a particularly special occasion, for it was also the first family vacation for the Morris’ in over a decade. Ray and Kelly are also enjoying everyday pleasures such as having their house all to themselves and watching their favorite T.V. show without any distractions. Yet, Ray is quick to admit Zach’s absence also highlights “how [their] lives were structured around [his] care” for 27 years. Realizing that they are no longer their son’s primary caregivers is “bittersweet.”

Like any parents, Ray and Kelly have navigated this experience with some anxiety and fear. Ray sometimes wonders if encouraging Zach to pursue his own life at the ADH home was the best decision. However, Ray remembers “It’s allowing and trusting that the decision to transition Zach to an ADH home will provide him a more fulfilled, independent life.” Kelly shares Ray’s concerns and has admitted that the “instinct to protect and hold on to him [has] battled with the reality of what was best for Zach.” All the worry is replaced with reassurance and peace when Ray and Kelly see Zach “laughing and having fun” with his new group of friends and care providers.

With Zach now settled into a routine, embracing all of the changes has become a bit easier. These days the Morris’ are looking toward the future, and The Arc wishes them the best!

Time to Check Your Health Insurance

If you are uninsured or looking for affordable health insurance, now is the time for you to look! During “open enrollment” you can purchase private health insurance through the marketplace in each state. Depending on your income, you may be eligible for assistance with your health insurance costs.

If you currently have insurance through the marketplace, you should look at your current plan and determine if it will continue to meet your needs, or select a better plan. If you do not take action, you will be automatically re-enrolled in your current plan or a similar plan. You should carefully review all health insurance notices and updates. Re-enrollment provides an important opportunity to report any changes to your income. If you income has increased, reporting changes to the marketplace may help you avoid paying future penalties.

2017 Open Enrollment
November 1, 2016
Open enrollment begins

December 15, 2016
Enroll before this date to have coverage January 1, 2017

January 31, 2017
Open enrollment ends

Why you should check your coverage:

  • Even if you like your health plan, new plans may be available and premiums or cost sharing may have changed since last year.
  • Even if your income has not changed, you could be eligible for more financial assistance.

If you have a disability or a health condition, pay attention to possible changes:

  • Are a broad range of health care providers included in the health plan’s network of providers?
  • Are there enough medical specialists in the network to meet your needs?
  • Are needed medications included in the plan’s list of covered drugs?
  • Is there adequate access to non-clinical, disability-specific services and supports?
  • Does the plan have service limits, such as caps on the number of office visits for therapy services?
  • Are mental health services covered to the same extent that other “physical” health benefits are covered?

Where to get help?

Health insurance can be complicated. If you or your family member needs assistance with understanding the options, healthcare.gov can help. This website has information about seeking assistance in local communities, explanations of health insurance terms, enrollment information and much more. There is also a 24-hour phone line for consumer assistance at 1-800-318-2596 to call for help.

The Arc Launches Voter Support Service for People with Disabilities to Report Voting Problems

Washington, DC – In advance of this crucial election, The Arc has launched a new Voter Support Service to help people with disabilities report any barriers they experience when voting, and get help to resolve their issue to ensure their vote is counted.

“People with intellectual and developmental disabilities should be a force in our election process. But we know that in 2012, one in five voters with disabilities experienced a barrier at the polls. This is unacceptable, and to help resolve this problem, we have created a tool at your fingertips to get help with casting your ballot. This site needs to be saved to your phone so that when you go to exercise your right to vote, you can get the help you may need to make your vote count,” said Peter Berns, CEO of The Arc.

The impact of the disability vote could be staggering – according to a report put out by Rutgers University School of Management and Labor Relations, titled “Projecting the Number of Eligible Voters with Disabilities in the November 2016 Elections”, in this election cycle there will be 62.7 million eligible voters who either have a disability or have a household member with a disability, more than one-fourth of the total electorate. A projected 35.4 million people with disabilities will be eligible to vote this year, representing close to one-sixth of the total electorate. And the number of eligible voters with disabilities has increased 10.8% since 2008, compared to an increase of 8.5% among eligible voters without disabilities.

The Arc is dedicated to helping resolve voting access problems in real-time, and has partnered with Election Protection’s national network of support. Election Protection is a nonpartisan service formed by a coalition of more than 100 local, state and national partner organizations that have a national response infrastructure to handle intake of complaints and problems with access to voting.

The Voter Support Service is a simple, mobile-friendly site for people with disabilities to ensure that their vote counts, and they are included in the democratic process. The Voter Support Service allows a voter on Election Day waiting to cast their ballot a way to ask for help or report a problem at a polling place; find a polling place; join The Arc’s national Disability Advocacy Network; and more.

“We at The Arc are dedicated to an inclusive society for people with disabilities that encompass all aspects of life, including the right to civic engagement. Voting is a fundamental form of expression that helps shape the future of our country. It’s incredibly important that people with disabilities vote. In the words of a disability rights legend Justin Dart, Jr., ‘vote as if your life depended on it, because it does’,” said Berns.

You can save the site to the home screen of your iPhone or Android by following these instructions.

This effort is being supported by the Ruderman Family Foundation and American Association of People with Disabilities.

 

The Arc advocates for and serves people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD), including Down syndrome, autism, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders, cerebral palsy and other diagnoses. The Arc has a network of more than 650 chapters across the country promoting and protecting the human rights of people with I/DD and actively supporting their full inclusion and participation in the community throughout their lifetimes and without regard to diagnosis.

Max Goldstein: Engineering His Future

In honor of National Disability Employment Month, we interviewed Max, a member of The Arc of the Midlands. A young man with autism, Max’s passion for technology recently led him to pursue and ultimately secure a position at the technology giant Microsoft. Let’s catch up with him to see how his journey to one of the top employers in the world started as well as learn some of his secrets of success.

Max’s path to competitive, integrated employment began at The Arc, and its affiliate, The Arc of the Midlands in South Carolina. Tapping into the parent organization’s The Arc@Work IT training program, Max was quickly connected with two additional organizations: first, Specialisterne USA, the U.S-based affiliate of Specialisterne Foundation. Specialisterne USA mission is to create 100,000 jobs for people with autism in North America, and second, Provail, a Seattle-based agency that assists businesses in hiring and training qualified job seekers with disabilities. Armed with these resources, Max embarked on a hiring process that would lead to the opportunity of a lifetime. He first participated in phone interviews with The Arc of the Midlands, then completed some reading tasks from Specialisterne, and finally, submitted a short project demonstrating his programming abilities. Once this stage was completed, Max flew to Microsoft headquarters in Redmond, Washington where he participated in a two-week evaluation period. During this time, he completed short programming assignments, as well as was informally interviewed by several hiring managers. This gave Max the opportunity to showcase his skills and assess fit with various Microsoft teams.

On the last two days of the evaluation period, Max had formal interviews with two hiring managers where he fielded more technical questions. Normally, this would be followed by an additional swath of analytical problems. But, in one of the interviews, the manager voluntarily waived this additional step, explaining “…it was unnecessary…to do a whiteboard problem….as [he] had assessed [his] skills between the informal interviews and reviewing [his] coding assignment”. This manager further advised “The whiteboard problem is one of the most widely used ways to assess a software engineer’s problem-solving skills, and skipping it (especially at Microsoft’s level) was a complete shock”. Even Max’s fellow candidates were amazed!

Shortly after the conclusion of the evaluation period, Max learned that both hiring managers extended a job offer! After much consideration, he accepted the position in the Core Operating System – Windows Fundamentals Division, primarily because of his interest in operating systems development. Shortly after officially accepting, Max eagerly began the on-boarding process.

Max now spends his days coding and engaging in problem solving sessions on Microsoft products. Often, this involves a number of cross-team meetings and lengthy discussions of new features. It is these moments that excite Max the most because he loves “designing and implementing complex solutions to complex problems”. For him, it’s “like solving a puzzle”.

Max is quick to credit The Arc of the Midlands and The Arc@Work for his success in his job search. Beyond guiding him through the initial interview process, staff connected him with rehabilitation services in his new state, and provided him with various resources and training prior to his interview. When asked to advise other job-seekers with disabilities, he comments: “Persistence is the key. Keep working on and refining your strengths and unique skillsets, as you’ll improve on them a lot quicker than your weaknesses…..You’ll eventually find an organization that recognizes your abilities and will hire you.” The new Microsoft hire further implores those currently in the job market to take advantage of all the support The Arc and its chapters have to offer: “[P]lease use resources like The Arc that help people with disabilities. They are more understanding of your situation than any other group out there, and will help you with your job search and your life in general.”

Walmart’s Curbside Pick-up Program May Reduce Shopping Stress for People with I/DD

This year, Walmart rolled out a free grocery pick-up program in over 80 markets nationwide. The program, which was launched last year and has been rapidly expanding over the last few months, allows customers to do their Walmart shopping online, choose a time to pick up their orders, and pick them up at their local stores where associates will load the items into their cars. Orders can be placed up to three weeks in advance, or can be ordered and picked up the same day (if the order is placed before 10 a.m.). Personal shoppers, who actually pick out the items ordered, are trained to evaluate items like meat or produce for quality and freshness, and to look carefully for any signs that something is past its peak.

This service was primarily designed to help customers like parents of young children, who may be spending their days running to and from appointments, school, work, and other activities. For them, it’s clear why ordering groceries on the go (from a smartphone, for example) and picking them up without ever leaving the car is a big plus. But, shaving your shopping time from an hour to five minutes can benefit anyone, not just busy moms.

According to Michael Bender, EVP and Chief Operating Officer of Walmart’s Global eCommerce department, “this service may help take some of the stress out of grocery shopping for people with disabilities and their families.” Because orders can be placed online and picked up quickly and conveniently, this service will make shopping easier for caregivers or people with I/DD who have busy schedules. Furthermore, because Walmart associates can load the groceries into customers’ cars, it improves accessibility for customers with mobility limitations.

In addition to groceries, the pickup service also includes general merchandise such as pet supplies or other household items. In all, more than 30,000 items are available for online order and pickup at the same prices as in the store.

Walmart has been a longtime supporter of The Arc. In addition to consulting with The Arc about how this grocery pickup program can support people with I/DD, Walmart has partnered with The Arc in the past to provide school-to-work transition programs, grow employment for people with I/DD in the recycling industry, and support healthy food and nutrition initiatives at chapters of The Arc.

Currently, 70% of Americans live within 5 minutes of a Walmart store and 90% live within ten miles of a Walmart store. And, of the stores offering the new pickup service, 80% are within 15 minutes’ drive of a chapter of The Arc. Clients of The Arc can receive $10 off their first purchase by using the code WMTCARES during checkout. Visit walmart.com/grocery to learn more and place an order.

Deadline Looming to File Discrimination Claims

The Arc would like to alert you to an important deadline if you have experienced discrimination based on your disability by the Greyhound bus company.  Below is the information from the U.S. Department of Justice.

“November 10, 2016, is the deadline for individuals with disabilities who experienced discrimination while they traveled or attempted travel on Greyhound Lines, Inc., to submit claims for compensation from Greyhound. This claims process was established in settlement of a lawsuit that the Department of Justice filed against Greyhound earlier this year. Pursuant to that settlement, Greyhound has hired a Claims Administrator to distribute an uncapped amount of compensation to people who:

  • have a disability;
  • traveled or attempted to travel on Greyhound between February 8, 2013, and February 8, 2016;
  • experienced a disability-related incident during the travel or attempted travel (for example, lack of accessible transportation or transportation-related services, Greyhound’s failure to make disability-related accommodations, etc.); and
  • submit a Claim Form by mail, email, or online to the Claims Administrator by no later than November 10, 2016.

Help is available from the Claims Administrator for those who are unable to complete the Claim Form due to a disability. Instructions regarding the claims process are available at the Claims Administrator’s website, www.DOJvGreyhoundSettlement.com. The Claims Administrator can also be reached by email at GRYsettlement@classactionadmin.com, toll-free at 1-844-502-5953 or 1-800-659-2656 (TTY), or by mail at U.S. v. Greyhound Claims Administrator, c/o Class Action Administration LLC, PO Box 6878, Broomfield, CO 80021.

For more information or for a copy of the consent decree, please visit our ADA website at www.ada.gov. Those interested in finding out more about the ADA may also call the Justice Department’s toll-free ADA Information Line at 800-514-0301 or 800-514-0383 (TDD).”

Chapter Volunteers Reduce Food Insecurity Through Community Service

meals-on-wheels-volunteersBy Nancy Stubbs, Development Director, The Arc Nature Coast

On October 16th, we recognize World Food Day. According to the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), 49 million people in the United States – including 16 million children, do not have reliable access to affordable, nutritious food. Providing food assistance is one way that communities can help improve all people’s access to healthy food. Through funding from CNCS, The Arc helps 10 chapters around the country organize service projects that aid community members in need.

Our chapters partnered with local service clubs and hunger-focused groups (e.g., community food banks, food pantries, soup kitchens) on events around the 2016 and 2017 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day of Service, and throughout the year to provide food assistance to community members who experience food insecurity. In the first year of funding, our chapters have recruited 690 volunteers who have contributed over 5,360 hours of service to feed over 9,833 people in need.

One such chapter, The Arc Nature Coast in Brooksville, Florida, addressed their lack of access to nutritious food by delivering local produce to nearby food banks, which typically serve canned and/or processed foods. First, The Arc Nature Coast met with local farmers to learn what fresh fruits and vegetables were in season. Next, The Arc Nature Coast partnered with the farmers to distribute fresh produce to 235 recipients at four different food banks. Additionally, The Arc Nature Coast partnered with their local Meals-on-Wheels program to deliver meals to senior citizens on a weekly basis.

Both projects enabled individuals with intellectual/developmental disabilities to work alongside farmers and volunteers. Feedback from volunteers with disabilities has been very positive, and suggests that participation had a positive effect on their self-esteem and feelings of inclusion. One volunteer stated, “They (recipients of Meals on Wheels) are counting on me to be there to bring them their food. They wouldn’t have food to eat if I didn’t help them.” Another added that, “it makes me feel good to help people.”