The Arc on the Front Lines of Defending Social Security

The Arc’s Peter Berns speaks out in Washington to protect Social Security from harmful cuts in budget negotiations. (at left is Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island)

The Arc’s Peter Berns speaks out in Washington to protect Social Security from harmful cuts in budget negotiations. (at left is Senator Sheldon Whitehouse of Rhode Island)

Many programs vital to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities (I/DD) have been at risk over the last few rounds of budget negotiations.  Right now, Social Security is in danger of cuts because of talk to change the benefit calculation.  This shift to what is called the “chained CPI” would have horrible consequences for people with I/DD, forcing them to make life and death choices.  The Arc’s CEO Peter Berns was invited to speak at a press conference in the U.S. Capitol today, organized by Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont.  Berns was joined by representatives from other organizations whose constituencies would be impacted by this benefit cut, including AARP, NOW, the AFL-CIO, and Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America.

Good morning. I’m Peter Berns, the Chief Executive Officer for The Arc. We are the largest national community-based organization advocating for and serving people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. We have over 175,000 members, and we serve more than 1 million people through our 700 state and local chapters nationwide.

Our nation’s Social Security system is a lifeline for over 56 million Americans including more than 10 million people who qualify because of a disability.

It’s a system that was built up over decades based on our shared commitment to each other. Changing the benefit calculation through the chained CPI isn’t just shaving a few dollars off here and there. We have a moral obligation to make sure that Social Security is there for all Americans in their time of need.

For people with disabilities, the monthly Social Security check can mean the difference between a home in the community, or life on the streets or in an institution.

It can mean the difference between food on the table, or hunger.

It can mean the difference between access to essential medicines and health care, or tempting illness or death.

Many beneficiaries with disabilities rely on Social Security for most or all of their income. With benefits only about $1,100 a month, every cent counts, and over the years the impact of the chained CPI would be real and painful.

Cuts from the chained CPI could also lead to terrible life and death choices for over 8 million very-low income seniors and people with disabilities who rely on Supplemental Security Income. SSI benefits are just over $500 a month.

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who organized the press conference, issued a strong defense of Social Security.

Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, who organized the press conference, issued a strong defense of Social Security.

Think about that – $500 a month is just pocket change for many affluent Americans.

It’s a monthly payment for a high-end car, or a plane ticket for a vacation.

But it’s all that many SSI beneficiaries have to exist on, month after month. The chained CPI would cut SSI benefits not once, but twice: first, before the person ever applies for benefits, by lowering the initial payment level, and second, through lower annual cost-of-living adjustments.

With SSI benefits already extremely low, it’s hard to imagine how beneficiaries would get by after cuts from the chained CPI.

In closing, thank you to Senator Sanders, Senator Whitehouse, and Senator Merkley and to our colleagues for bringing us together today to highlight how the chained CPI would hurt working Americans, seniors, veterans, women, and people with disabilities. We stand united against this harmful benefit cut.