Victims with FASD Highlighted in Academic Journal

Journal of Psychiatry & Law

Many people don’t know about FASD (Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder) or how common it is in the U.S. because it often goes undetected or is misdiagnosed. Similarly, most don’t realize that people with disabilities are more likely to be victims of crime compared to those without disabilities. A new, groundbreaking double issue of the Journal of Psychiatry and Law regarding people with FASD in the criminal justice system is bringing these two “underground” worlds of FASD and victimization together to be dissected and studied under one theoretical roof.

As The Arc’s Project and Information Specialist and an expert on these issues, I had the exciting opportunity to contribute to this issue! Speaking to experts in a wide array of victimization, disability and legal fields served to broaden my own perspective of how to best serve this population, and the co-authors I worked with had a similar experience. I am equally thrilled to be attending a press conference in Washington, D.C. on November 17 hosted by the National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (NOFAS) to announce the release of this unique special issue. After the press conference NOFAS is coordinating an “FASD & The Law” policy luncheon to prioritize policy recommendation in the justice arena and develop an action plan after which they will videotape interviews with professionals and experts on the topic. Those video interviews will be available soon on the NOFAS website and possibly distributed via The Arc.

Even though a high percentage of incarcerated juveniles and adults have symptoms of FASD, many lawyers, judges and mental health professionals don’t know much about it so it continues to go unrecognized. This special issue of Journal of Psychiatry and Law helps raise awareness of the serious needs of people with FASD, and gives advocates concrete information that helps them serve victims with an FASD more confidently and compassionately.

Training is a critical tool used to educate parents, self-advocates, victim assistance agencies, court personnel and others about serving crime victims with an FASD. As a follow up to the press conference, experts will offer a free training in the Washington, D.C. area to help practitioners know how to look for red flags that identify individuals with Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) who are involved in the court system.  It will address why they may have IQ’s above 70 but have low adaptive behavior skills and describe how courts should treat people who have cognitive and neuro-developmental needs, including the importance of knowing how to provide accommodations. If you are interested in learning more about the journal article, press conference or training, please contact me at ldavis@thearc.org.